Which type of nailer is suitable for use with plywood?


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Old 03-20-08, 04:25 PM
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Which type of nailer is suitable for use with plywood?

I'm looking to buy a nailer and am unsure which type would be suitable for the project that I'm planning. Specifically, I want to put in plywood along the crumple walls in my basement to guard against damage during an earthquake. (I live in California.) Would a finishing nailer be sufficient (and also something that I might use down the line for other projects, e.g., baseboards)? Or do I need a framing nailer? Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 07:40 PM
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Welcome to the forums! It could depend on the thickness of the plywood you will be using. For some applications using 1/2" or thinner plywood, I like using a narrow crown stapler with 1 1/2" staples. If you have a framework, you could use glue and either a brad nailer with 18 gauge brads or a finish nailer using either 15 or 16 gauge finish nails. To buy one will limit your uses, but a finish nailer would be a good choice for all around use for other projects.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 08:58 PM
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I don't know anything about earthquakes or the requirements for nailing such panels... but if one "imagined" that the same rules that apply to exterior sheathing would also apply to this interior "sheathing" of sorts, then you would probably need to either use the crown stapler (if it meets code for fastener requirements in your area) that Chandler mentioned, or a framing nailer, and short 6d or 7d nails, or whatever is required by your local code... again I'm not familiar with building in earthquake zones. The size of the nail and the spacing would be critical to give you any sort of shear strength, I would imagine, so that finish nailer you mentioned is without a doubt completely out of the question.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 03:53 AM
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I agree, if the plywood is to be used as a support sheathing, use the framing nailer with short nails. I was thinking as a decorative panel as opposed to supporting panels. What type framing will you be fastening this stuff to, and what size plywood will you be using?
 
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Old 03-21-08, 04:10 AM
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I would think you would get more use out of a finish nailer but agree it isn't suitable for this job. 2 alternatives would be to hand nail or to use screws.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 06:47 AM
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How come you guys are missing the justification for buying two nail guns here? I agree that the framing nailer is probably the one for this job.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 09:17 AM
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A follow up question

Thanks for the info everyone. Where I live, the recommended type of plywood to use in this sort of project is 1/2" CDX five-ply plywood and nailed with 8d common nails with full heads. (Does that all make sense?) So it sounds like a framing nailer is called for. The follow up question I have is whether a framing nailer can then be used for less intensive work, such as putting on baseboards? I'm trying to get a sense not only of what I need for this project, but also uses down the road, and thus which type of (or how many) nailers I might think about buying. Thanks again for any advice.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 09:24 AM
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A framing nailer is just as it says, primarily framing, tho with the right nails it can be used as stated, for plywood sheathing.

For baseboard, casing, etc, you'll need either a finish nailer (i'd go with an angled head myself), or at least a 2" brad nailer.

If you feel you might have a use for both, I'd be looking at one of the kits that are offered. I got a Senco angled finish nailer, brad nailer and stapler for $99 (yes you heard that right, $99!!), brand new. Think it was a closeout, but who cares. I think PC has kits that include a framer, finish and bradder, but haven't looked in a while.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 01:54 PM
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No, you're going to need different guns. Also, it sounds like you should skip the clipped-head framing guns.
 
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Old 03-22-08, 04:15 PM
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Different nailers for different tasks, but you can rent these tools from some home centers if you won't be using it much after the current project. A hammer will substitute for small framing projects but a finish nailer is SO much better for trim than using a nailset.
 
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Old 03-22-08, 04:25 PM
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rent? RENT?? Oh gawd no!...any project requires a new tool!!!! Thats the rule! ..lol
 
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Old 03-23-08, 01:24 PM
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I'm up to two air compressors (different brands, same size) and two framing nailers (one round, one clipped) as well as other air-powered fastening tools. Two circular saws, one right, one left and neither one a wormdrive. Gotta have one hand for the saw and one for the nailer. Someone else is going to have to hold the lumber in place. My wife can tell you about dangerous habits like that.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 03:21 PM
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Tools are writeoffs. Writeoffs help with taxes. That's the only logic I need, besides I am an addict. I think back to when all my carpenter tools fit in a hip box with a broomstick handle across it. Now they won't fit in a 24' x 24' shop, plus a 6' x 10' jobsite trailer, and twin 8' side boxes on my flat bed.
 
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Old 03-23-08, 05:01 PM
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See..thats what I'm talkin about..tools, tools and more tools!!!!
 
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Old 03-23-08, 06:15 PM
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I'm an addict, you're a mainliner, and hopeless.
 
 

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