Sandblaster--appropriate use?

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  #1  
Old 06-05-00, 08:00 PM
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I have two things I'm wanting to strip paint from. One is a fireplace (brick, overpainted white) and the second are some structural beams in my living room.

After trying several other things for the fireplace, I'm thinking of trying a sandblaster. From what I've read, it is an appropriate use of that tool.

I don't know, however, if the sandblaster would eat the wood away from my structural beams.

Beams are rough-cut wood. I think they're oak, but can't see enough of the bare wood to tell. They are true structural supports for my living room--not just look-alikes.

This is my only option. Wood is too rough to strip any other way.

Would it work? Would it eat away the wood?

Help appreciated!

Leslie <[email protected]>
 
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  #2  
Old 06-05-00, 08:43 PM
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A sandblaster would work, the appropriate media for both the wood and brick is walnut shells, but using a sandblaster indoors would be a last resort.

First, walnut shells are more expensive than sand and it would require hundreds of pounds, unless there was a recovery system. The work room would have to be sealed off and ventilation provided, plus doors, windows, floors and everything else would have to be protected from flying debris. If you choose this, have it done professionally, because between rentals and purchasing protective gear it would be more costly. The mess will be absolutely unbelievable.

For paint removal have you tried "peel away"(?) or "Star 10"? Either one will work on rough work and brick. Star 10 is more expensive than peel away, (which isn't cheap in the first place), but either is much less expensive than setting up for sandblasting in an occupied unit.
 
  #3  
Old 07-12-00, 08:24 AM
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Using a sandblaster is an appropriate tool in both of these instances. I bought a house last summer and used a sandblaster to clean up the brick on my fireplace which had overspray and drips on the bricks. I used a type of abrasive called Black Beauty which is essentially ground up coal slag. I have sandblasted for years and this is a really good way to remove built up coatings from surfaces. The biggest drawback you will have is whatever type of media you use will go everywhere. You can do it yourself - all you need is a good air compressor and good protective clothing. I would recommend the following for clothing: You need something to protect your face - you can buy sandblasting hoods but I recently have been using a cheap welders mask, you need good gloves- again heavy leather welders gloves work really well. You should also use a respirator which you can buy at Sears or Home Depot if you will be an enclosed room because it will generate a lot of fine dust. When I sandblasted the bricks on my fireplace I found one of the things I had to watch out for was the sandblasting taking too much of the mortar away if I stayed in one place for too long. This is the biggest reason to be careful with the type of abrasive you use. Sandblasting the beams might work well with the Black Beauty. Wood is not "hard" like rock or metal and when sandblasting resilient materials like wood the sandblasting tends to not remove material like it would on a harder surface. My best suggestion is to try it out on one spot before commiting to doing the entire beam. If you are looking for a source of sandblasting equipment try www.eastwoodcompany.com - they specialize in car restoration but they have a good selection of sandblasting equipment. Sears is also a good source for inexpensive sandblasting guns. Good luck and feel free to ask any questions you may have.
 
  #4  
Old 07-12-00, 01:49 PM
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2000 said it all. By the time you get done buying all of these inexpensive gear, guns, sand, and gas to drive to Sears, it would have been cheaper to have it done. What do you do will all the equipment afterward? Have
a garage sale ? Hire a pro. They are quick, fast, neat, and be done before you can even buy all your equipment. Good Luck
 
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