Power drill, what to look for ??


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Old 06-30-08, 02:42 PM
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Power drill, what to look for ??

Good afternoon,

I am looking to buy a new power drill for my husband but have no idea where to start with so many options. This would be for moderate use, general household use. Also, any brands recommended or NOT recommended ?? Thanks in advance for any input.
 
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Old 06-30-08, 02:58 PM
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Stay away from low end entry level no name drills.These are all imported and are not reliable.

A 3/8 in variable speed reversible drill is a good all around home owner drill.It will do whatever you need to do.

A cordless drill is great when plugging it in is a problem like outside etc but make sure you get one that has a pretty high battery voltage like at least 12 volts but preferably above that.

You'll get a lot of opinions on brands however the home owner grade brands such as Black & Decker and Skil are fine as long as occasional home use is all you'll need it for.

DeWalt and Makita are the next step up and are better quality products but will be priced accordingly.

Go to a store that has knowledgeable saleshelp to assist you....don't just go out and pick one with no assistance.Drills are commonly promoted.Sometimes this is a good chance to save a few bucks but be careful as sometimes promoted drills are not the best models.You can also sometimes find drills in sets with accessories.These can be good deals.
 
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Old 06-30-08, 03:23 PM
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Welcome to the DoItYourself.com forums

I agree. Just wanted to add that I have a Makita (my first choice) and I love it. However, my hands got a hold of using a Dewalt and now I love the Dewalt, only b/c of the weight and the grip. I have small hands and muscles so maybe that's why. If you think you might be using it too *hint hint*...make sure you like it too (hush hush).

Anyway, does your husband currently have one and maybe perhaps you've heard him say something like.."I wish I had a..."? or "I hate this one..". Good things to follow and to observe.

Cordless-a must. IMO
 
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Old 06-30-08, 03:46 PM
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Heres what I always asked when I got those questions at work.

Does you husband have any power tools now?

What brands are they? (this gives an idea of whether he is a discerning tool shopper or just gets "something")

Will this be something that gets used daily, weekly, monthly?
.....If its an occasional thing, a corded drill will have more power and cost less than a cordless. But they aren't as handy.

Will it get used primarily as a drill...or as a driver?
.......There are some great tools out there if you just want a cordless driver. I have a Rigid "stick type" drill driver that I grab all the time for light duty stuff. And I love the little Bosch Lithium Ion mini drivers, even tho they're small they're not toys!

How much do you want to spend?
.......... You have options from about $40-140...thats just for a drill, charger and battery.


I didn't see Ryobi mentioned, but you can get some great bargains, esp when the models are changing or after a holiday promo. For instance I got the last of one of their Xmas promo's, cordless saw, drill, charger and 2 18v batteries (coulda been 1, I have a bunch)....$69! You can't buy a battery for a Makita or Dewalt for $69. I think Ryobi is perfectly adequate for the avg homeowner, and even a moderate-advanced DIY'er.

JMO
 
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Old 06-30-08, 05:42 PM
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Just another two cents worth....If he only occasionally uses the tool, then a battery powered one may not be the best choice. Batteries die, and only when you need them. You can't keep them on charge forever, either. A good corded 3/8 or 1/2" (my choice) variable speed, reversible drill would do good. Brands, all mentioned, all good.
 
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Old 07-15-08, 08:17 PM
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For moderate, weekend project work, almost any name brand will do, including black and decker.

If it will be used for masonry work as well, a hammer drill might be needed.

A 3/8" chuck is common for weekend project orientated drills, but 1/2" is perhaps the most versatile.

I have a 14.4v B&D, but now I'm wanting to get an 18v Milwaukee, but I would say 14.4v is the minimum you want to go.

DeWalt, Rigid and Milwaukee are premium choices. I'd say DeWalt and Milwaukee compete for first place, but I'm biased to Milwaukee as I live there.

Makita and Bosch are mid level.

Black & Decker, Master Force and Skil tend to be lower end, but certainly not crap. My B&D has been holding up nicely and I've used it for masonry and drilling out screws and metal anchors. However, Master Force seems to be a new brand on the market that appears to be handled exclusively through Menards as I've not seen it elsewhere. Whether the brand is any good is something I'm trying to find out.
 
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Old 07-16-08, 05:16 AM
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look at the Ryobi , Ive been using them for 10-12 years now and have been pleased with them .

go on any Jobsite in this area and you'll see the "pros" using Ryobi 2-3 to one vs the so called "pro" brands

Ive been through Makita , Milwaukee , and Dewalt before I gave Ryobi a chance , glad did

Chandler makes a good point about cordless , if you do decide on cordless try the Lithum , the batteries will hold the charge between uses but I would agree for occasional use a 1/2 corded and a good 100' extension cord is the way to go
 
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Old 07-16-08, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by mango man View Post
look at the Ryobi , Ive been using them for 10-12 years now and have been pleased with them .

go on any Jobsite in this area and you'll see the "pros" using Ryobi 2-3 to one vs the so called "pro" brands
The foundation repairs contractors who did my basement used DeWalt and Rigid equipment and they had to do some major work.
 
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Old 07-16-08, 05:38 AM
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The foundation repairs contractors who did my basement used DeWalt and Rigid equipment and they had to do some major work.
where not talking about tools to do "major work" here . I'm on various jobsites most days and there are far more ryobi in use by HVAC , plumber's, Cabinet makers , electricians , window installers ,remodel's etc etc etc than other brands in my observation

which inst to say that I don't see Bosch, Rigid , Milwaukee , Makita ect ect ect in use .

It like saying most contractors drive pickups , Doesn't mean one wont show up in a Hummer
 
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Old 07-16-08, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by mango man View Post
where not talking about tools to do "major work" here . I'm on various jobsites most days and there are far more ryobi in use by HVAC , plumber's, Cabinet makers , electricians , window installers ,remodel's etc etc etc than other brands in my observation
Perhaps you should qualify your statement in more detail then. A "jobsite" is so general, that it qualifies oil rigging too.
 
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Old 07-17-08, 05:33 AM
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Perhaps you should qualify your statement in more detail then. A "jobsite" is so general, that it qualifies oil rigging too.


it could and I wouldn't be surprised to find ryobi on oil rigs either


Main Entry: job site
Part of Speech: n
Definition: a location at which construction or remodeling is taking place
Example: We met the electricians at the job site.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/job%20site?r=14

sounds like you dont spend much time at one , Robert
 
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Old 07-17-08, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by mango man View Post


it could and I wouldn't be surprised to find ryobi on oil rigs either


http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/job%20site?r=14

sounds like you dont spend much time at one , Robert
Sorry my friend, but that is the lamest dictionary available and for you to reference it...shameful, but not near as shameful as your misinterpretation of the definition.

From Webster's Third New International Unabridged Dictionary (this book is a gopher squisher):

Jobsite: it references to JOB 9.

Job: 9: the area used to carry on a job (as of construction) (lumber stored in piles on the ~)

The operative phrase is "as of," meaning including, but not limited to.

Therefore, your use of jobsite to determine where a Ryobi is used is still far too general.

So, DeWalt and Milwaukee are still heavy duty commercial and industrial strength tools.

Words are what I do and you'll lose if try to go up against me in my field.
 
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Old 07-17-08, 06:00 AM
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Sorry my friend, but that is the lamest dictionary available and for you to reference it...shameful but not near as shameful as your misinterpretation of the definition.


so Websters is the Lamest dictionary ?
source quoted

http://dictionary.reference.com/help/wmde.html
Webster's New Millennium Dictionary of English, Preview Edition

<cite> Barbara Ann Kipfer
Editor

Copyright 2002 - 2006 by Lexico Publishing Group, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
Long Beach, California, U.S.A.</cite>
Words are what I do and you'll lose if try to go up against me in my field
your obviously not in the trades , I cant imagine saying jobsite to anyone in the trades and have the coming up with a BS argument as to what a job site is

So, DeWalt and Milwaukee are still heavy duty commercial and industrial strength tools.
my real life experience says otherwise , I have gotten more service out of my Ryobi than I did out of the Dewalt and Milwaukee's I have owned

so mister "wordsmith " (}have you used all three on a daily basis to come to your conclusions ?

I have
 
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Old 07-17-08, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by mango man View Post
http://dictionary.reference.com/help/wmde.html
your obviously not in the trades , I cant imagine saying jobsite to anyone in the trades and have the coming up with a BS argument as to what a job site is
A dictionary definition is a BS argument? Do you realize you just destroyed the foundation of your entire argument?

Who started with dictionary definitions?

I thought so.

I'm done with you.
 

Last edited by robert_s; 07-17-08 at 06:41 AM.
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Old 07-17-08, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by robert_s View Post
A dictionary definition is a BS argument? Who started with dictionary definitions?

I thought so.

I'm done with you.
see you around the jobsite
 
 

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