DeWalt Cordless Power Tools And XRP Batteries

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Old 09-19-08, 05:25 PM
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DeWalt Cordless Power Tools And XRP Batteries

Hello I've been doing some research on DeWalt's cordless power tools and was thinking about the picking up the circular saw and maybe the reciprocating saw as well. Looking for someone with some first hand knowledge on these to ask a few questions before I make a purchase. I would first like to know home many times you can recharge these tools before it won't hold a charge or the run time is diminished. Also is the run time on these batteries up to the hype the company advertises they clam a 40% increase and a substantial improvement in how many times it can be recharged. I'm new here and really looking forward to the help. Thanks!

Tom j.
 
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Old 09-19-08, 05:51 PM
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I have a DeWalt 14v cordless drill--expensive-yes.
Worth the money--you bet !!
Around 7 years old-batteries recharge in a few minutes.
My other cordless units can take up to one hour.
Best cordless I have ever owned.............................
 
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Old 09-19-08, 05:51 PM
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The XRP battery is pretty much the standard nowdays- almost every Dewalt tool comes with them. They are an improvement over their old batteries, which you don't see much of anymore.

They have a 1 yr warranty, if that tells you anything. I've used those tools for probably the last 12 years or more, and I've gone through two pair of batteries. So 5 years is probably the average lifetime, I would estimate. IMO, you will get more life out of them if you use them frequently, as opposed to something you use once a month. They will also last longer if you can keep them out of the heat (not inside a hot car) don't charge them in direct sunlight (you don't get a good charge if you do that) and also keep them out of the freezing cold as much as possible in the winter.

Not sure which model of 18V circular saw you are looking at, but there are several. Don't waste your time with the 5 1/2", go for the 6 1/2". And one has more of a curve to the handle, with a heavier base plate. That's the one to get if you are choosing Dewalt.

I have a reciprocating saw too, and like it for occasional sawing. If there is a lot of cutting to do, I get out my corded reciprocating saw. No sense wearing batteries down. The same goes for the skilsaw, really.
 
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Old 09-19-08, 06:38 PM
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Go for a combo kit if you can find one with the better saws. You can literally save hundreds by going that way.
 
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Old 09-19-08, 07:09 PM
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I use my DeWalt tools for work and do they get a work out. It is nothing for me to grab a 1/2" by 12 " long massonary bit and drill through concrete block. One thing I have heard and learned from experience is about over heating the batteries. If the battery starts to get hot change it out and let it cool before using it again. Take it out of the charger when it gets charged leaving it in will only heat it up and destroy it. Change the battery when it will not do what you are using it for. No need to drain it dead. When mine does not run the saw well enough it will drive screws for awhile.
The circular saw and sawzall are both pretty good and come in mighty handy. I use my sawzall with a pruning blade to cut limbs with when there is just not enough to break out the chain saw.

G
 
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Old 09-19-08, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
The XRP battery is pretty much the standard nowdays- almost every Dewalt tool comes with them. They are an improvement over their old batteries, which you don't see much of anymore.

They have a 1 yr warranty, if that tells you anything. I've used those tools for probably the last 12 years or more, and I've gone through two pair of batteries. So 5 years is probably the average lifetime, I would estimate. IMO, you will get more life out of them if you use them frequently, as opposed to something you use once a month. They will also last longer if you can keep them out of the heat (not inside a hot car) don't charge them in direct sunlight (you don't get a good charge if you do that) and also keep them out of the freezing cold as much as possible in the winter.

Not sure which model of 18V circular saw you are looking at, but there are several. Don't waste your time with the 5 1/2", go for the 6 1/2". And one has more of a curve to the handle, with a heavier base plate. That's the one to get if you are choosing Dewalt.

I have a reciprocating saw too, and like it for occasional sawing. If there is a lot of cutting to do, I get out my corded reciprocating saw. No sense wearing batteries down. The same goes for the skilsaw, really.
Hi XSleeper first I would like to thank everyone that responded. I should have mentioned I was considering the 18 volt opposed to the 14 volt ones and as far as the circular saw it's the heavy duty one 6 1/2 inch see link below. Just wondering what the run time is on your reciprocating saw is how many 2 by 4's do you think you could cut with a fresh battery same goes for the circular saw, just trying to get a feel for the run time. I read that you an recharge these up to 800 times does that sound correct, also said 2000 times for the lithium cells. Please see last link #6 Thanks!

Tom j.


http://www.toolbarn.com/product/dewalt/DC390BT/

http://www.toolking.com/dewalt_nano_faq.aspx
 
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Old 09-20-08, 05:38 AM
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I use the Dewalt 14.4 drill (two of them) with several batteries. I have the standard 120 volt chargers, but also have one that charges via the power point in my truck (very handy). I love the torque and longevity of good batteries. I hate to buy batteries. I think they are overpriced (sort of like diesel fuel). You can find good deals for new ones on Ebay, and I frequent there for my replacements rather than donating to the Big Orange retirement fund for CEO's.
The older 18 volt drills were ill balanced with a forward weight. The newer ones have an offset handle making them easier to use for prolonged periods.
I do use an 18 volt jig saw and Airless angle finish nailer, and love 'em.
Now, getting away from big yellow and black (not a Ga. Tech fan). A homeowner will be well advised to check out the Ryobi line of tools. Considerably less expensive than Dewalt, PC, etc.; a little less torque; and you will give a sigh of relief when you have to buy batteries at 1/3 the cost of Dewalt.
 
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Old 09-20-08, 07:11 AM
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i used to use a dewalt 18 volt to mix neet grout for plugging soil probe borings mixing up to 5 bags of portland at a time to the consistoncy of jello and i will tell you that they are the best on the market, my old dewalt got stolen and now i have ridgid because of the warrenty when i bought it they were offering a lifetime warrenty on the drill, big mistake i should have gone with the dewalt (known commodity) oh well when this one dies back to dewalt.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies.
 
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Old 09-20-08, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
I use the Dewalt 14.4 drill (two of them) with several batteries. I have the standard 120 volt chargers, but also have one that charges via the power point in my truck (very handy). I love the torque and longevity of good batteries. I hate to buy batteries. I think they are overpriced (sort of like diesel fuel). You can find good deals for new ones on Ebay, and I frequent there for my replacements rather than donating to the Big Orange retirement fund for CEO's.
The older 18 volt drills were ill balanced with a forward weight. The newer ones have an offset handle making them easier to use for prolonged periods.
I do use an 18 volt jig saw and Airless angle finish nailer, and love 'em.
Now, getting away from big yellow and black (not a Ga. Tech fan). A homeowner will be well advised to check out the Ryobi line of tools. Considerably less expensive than Dewalt, PC, etc.; a little less torque; and you will give a sigh of relief when you have to buy batteries at 1/3 the cost of Dewalt.
Hi say the only reason I was considering the DeWalt over the other brands was the run time of the XRP batteries aren't they superior to the other brands, anyone know or could you guess how many cross cuts you could get on a 2x4 on a full charge with those XRP batteries. Thanks!!

Tom j.
 
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Old 09-20-08, 05:49 PM
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No way to say exactly how many cuts you can get, so much depends on the wood and condition of the blade. Dry studs or wet PT 2x4's.

Isn't XRP still the NiCad batteries?

Cordless tools as a rule are for a few cuts, small repairs or minor jobs,..... handyman type stuff. Yes, they will do most of the jobs of corded tools, just not as long or as fast, normally.

I use my Ryobi stuff for almost everything, but I have 7 batteries and 2 chargers.

If yer going to be building a deck or a shed, then corded tools are the way to go.

What do you want to do with these tools, that might be a better question.

You asked for opinions, right?
 
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Old 09-20-08, 07:25 PM
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Run time lasts until the battery dies, no matter the brand, and they all last about the same. As GG says, it will really depend on what you are drilling or cutting. With several batteries charged at all times, it won't matter on run time.
 
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Old 09-20-08, 08:52 PM
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Ok guys thanks! so are you saying these new XRP batteries are basically hype with pretty much the same run time as the other brands if so I might just get a Drill Master combo pack for 80 bucks saw a Buddy's circular saw looks really nice, just wanted the cordless stuff for the convenience, I hate cords but I thought the Dewalt had better batteries, and thus better or longer run time.

Tom j.
 
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Old 10-13-08, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by BunkyX View Post
Take it out of the charger when it gets charged leaving it in will only heat it up and destroy it.
That is the exact opposite of what Dewalt says.

Dewalt says to keep batteries in the charger whenever they are not being used. They say there is no adverse effects. If keeping the batteries in the chargers would destroy them as you stated, I'm sure we would not be told to do so by the company that warranties them. Remember, these batteries die QUICKLY, they lose up to 20% of their charge in the first 24 hours, then another 10% the next day.

I keep all my Dewalt batteries in chargers, so they all are fully charged when needed and well maintained.
 
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Old 10-13-08, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by VoltageHz View Post
That is the exact opposite of what Dewalt says.

Dewalt says to keep batteries in the charger whenever they are not being used. They say there is no adverse effects. If keeping the batteries in the chargers would destroy them as you stated, I'm sure we would not be told to do so by the company that warranties them. Remember, these batteries die QUICKLY, they lose up to 20% of their charge in the first 24 hours, then another 10% the next day.

I keep all my Dewalt batteries in chargers, so they all are fully charged when needed and well maintained.

I agree. Once the battery is charged, it draws only charge maintenance current. A charged battery in the charger is not hot. If it is, there is some other problem.

Copied from the DeWalt site ....

Does it hurt DEWALT batteries to leave them in the charger?No. The DEWALT chargers have a maintenance mode which allows batteries to remain in the charger, maintaining a fully charged pack until the user is ready to work. If the batteries are stored outside of the charger, they will discharge naturally, 15-20% the first 24 hours, 7-10% the next day, and about 1% every day there after. NiCd batteries lose the bulk of the capacity when outside of the charger in the first 3 days. In fact, it is better for the battery to leave it in the charger to be sure it goes through Equalization and Maintenance Modes.
 
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Old 10-13-08, 12:19 PM
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Another big advantage of LI-ON

I wouldn't consider a new nicad battery tool at this point
 
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Old 10-13-08, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by mango man View Post
Another big advantage of LI-ON

I wouldn't consider a new nicad battery tool at this point
IMO the LI-ON aren't worth the cost to me. I bought a couple extra chargers for about $8 each on eBay and now all my NiCad batteries are 100% charged when I need them. The Li-Ons just aren't worth it yet.
 
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Old 10-28-08, 03:16 PM
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The power regulation of lithium is better than nicad. My 18V ridgid drill has full power until the battery is dead my old 14.4 dewalt lost power slowly until it crept along. Lithium also charges faster, doens't dissipate as quickly without use and aren;t as affected by outside temps. The run times are still less when it's cold outside but the lithoum seemed to be bit better. I haven't used the cordless reciprocating saws (considering the 18v ridgid), but I haven't heard good things about any of them.
 
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Old 10-28-08, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by scubasimmons View Post
My 18V ridgid drill has full power until the battery is dead my old 14.4 dewalt lost power slowly until it crept along.
Maybe you had a problem with your 14.4V Dewalt drill or batteries. I've used those as well as the 18V thousands of times over the years, it's just about all the contractors stock. They go strong until the end. Sure, there is a little bit of time at the very end where you can feel it dying, but that is time to change it, you shouldn't let it get that low. The same with Lithium.

I also love the Dewalt 18V Sawzall, afteer using many on the job I decided to buy myself one. They're on eBay for around $130 for the saw, battery, and charger. All brand new, you can't beat that deal.

And if you stock up on extra chargers for around $8-10 each you'll always have your NiCad 18V fuly charged and ready to go, at a much lower cost than lithium.

Just my opinion from my experiences.
 
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