Connect 2 Air Compressors to one Line

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Old 06-02-09, 03:03 PM
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Connect 2 Air Compressors to one Line

We are about to add to our big arsenal of 2 HP air compressors. Actually, we are just adding another 2HP 12 Gallon compressor. We would like to tie these two compressors to one line. Sort of make them share the small load being used. Is it possible to connect to air compressors to one air supply line to provide "load balancing"? If so, how can this be performed?

Thanks for your assistance
AP
 
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Old 06-02-09, 06:15 PM
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You won't be gaining anything, but running two compressors where you were only running one. And they would run out of sync with each other. You would be better off attaching your compressor to a larger tank only for volume.
 
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Old 06-03-09, 08:10 AM
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So we are doubling the amount of devices/demand connected to the air supply line. Connecting 2 inputs to the air supply would not "load balance"? What you are suggesting is having the two compressors supply a resevoir where all devices could then pull from? I am unclear as to how that would be a benefit. Wouldn't the compressors get out of sync there too?
 
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Old 06-03-09, 03:51 PM
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What are you using the compressors for and what do you mean by load balancing?

Another thought on that is that by adding a second compressor you will be doubling your cfm if they are both the same size.
A larger air reservoir for a single compressor will give you more storage but that would only last until the compressor cuts in.

If you connect two compressors together you may have to tweak the pressure controls.
How it should work is that one compressor would be set about five pounds lower than the other.
For example, the lead compressor would cycle between 95 and 105 psi and the lag compressor would cut in at 90 psi.

Also, if you have a permanent air line of some distance it doesn't matter where on the line you connect the compressor as long as it is large enough to carry the volume of air you are using.
 
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Old 06-03-09, 08:17 PM
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No, I was saying use one compressor and an aux tank for volume. It will keep the compressor from cycling as much. Hooking two compressors together, IMO, won't benefit you if you are running nail guns, etc. Like Greg says, what are you using the compressors for?
 
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Old 06-28-09, 11:19 AM
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hey guys came across this older thread and had a question to add....I have a kaput 30 gal compressor and bought a better motor/smaller compressor how do I link the two for volume? and what settings do I need to change on the two for the benefit of more volume. I do paint and bodywork in my garage so a lot of continuous use in the future.....thanks
 
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Old 06-28-09, 01:17 PM
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not sure why all the hub bub about hooking multiple compressors to the same tank. It's done all the time and depending what the reason is, the controls are different.


One of the biggest uses I have hooked up is having alternating compressors with a lead lag back up system. What that does is cause the (2 in this scenario) compressors to run alternately when they typically cycle maintaining a similar amount of run time on each of them.

What the lead lag does is; when there is more air used than one compressor can keep up with, the second comp is started to supply that additional air.


The problem when using different sized compressors, especially small compressors is, you cannot run your system beyond what the smaller comp will supply, pressure wise.

If you have problems where one compressor runs all the time and the other one never kicks in, you can hook the units to a common pressure switch (obviously this needs to be a switch or power supply designed to handle whatever you are doing). This way, both comps will run whenever there is call for air.
 
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Old 06-28-09, 02:56 PM
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Or buy a compressor that will handle the job. Sounds like a PITA to me.
DUosdining, welcome to the forums!! Hey, this isn't that "old", we usually have someone resurrect posts from 2000. The volume of air will be determined by the size of the tank. All you will need to worry about is matching the compressor head to the tank so it won't constantly run. Set the pressure at the max allowed, sometimes 120 lbs, and have it kick in at about 75 psi. You are painting, so you won't use much more than 15 psi at the outlet anyway, so you should have a good volume to work with.
 
 

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