Allied 160-Piece Tool Set ....... is this a good set of tools to have?

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Old 10-20-09, 12:10 PM
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Question Allied 160-Piece Tool Set ....... is this a good set of tools to have?

Hello all,

I don't know if this is the right forum to post this, but i figured given the title, its was close enough. If its not, feel free to move it.

I am wondering if the Allied International 160-Piece Rolling Case Tool Set is a good set of tools to own. I have to pick out a gift and this was one of my options. As a homeowner, I don't have much in the way of tools, so I wonder if this could be a good choice for me.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 10-20-09, 12:20 PM
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Can't find any real info...but I'd say no. It appears to be pretty cheap. If the gift is for yourself...I'd ask for a Sears gift card and buy Craftsman tools. Or Kobalt from Lowes....
 
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Old 10-20-09, 06:49 PM
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You say that this is one option for a gift. I agree with Gunguy, but if you cannot go outside the box, and if you don't have any heavy duty renovation or repair projects in mind, This will beat using a butter knife as a screwdriver.
 
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Old 10-20-09, 07:21 PM
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Buy American made hand tools...

Most Craftsman (sears), Kobalt (lowes) and Husky (home depot) HAND tools are warantied for life
 
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Old 10-22-09, 05:10 AM
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I have to agree with what everyone else has said. There are cheap tools and there inexpensive tools. This is the type of set you would get at BJ's and regret it for the rest of your life. I once bought a socket set for $5 dollars and the first time I used it I stripped the head of the bolt I was trying to remove. The metal in the socket was so cheap that it just turned on the bolt head. I spent the better part of a day trying to grind the bolt out. Never again would I buy cheap tools. If you do decide to buy a Craftsman socket set wait until Thanksgiving and you can usually get a good set for half off. Buy a 6 point set and not a 12 point and you'll never strip the head of a bolt.
 
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Old 10-22-09, 01:17 PM
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Thank you, guys! I'll pick out something else (its a anniversary gift from work) and buy more reliable tools.

What is the basic tool set that I need? I have a few screwdrivers, a hammer and a drill (that I bought from Walmart) that doesn't work .....hmmm, actually it stopped working after 3 uses. I guess that goes to show that I should buy good quality tools.

Thanks again
 
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Old 10-22-09, 01:31 PM
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A basic mechanics set from Sears will cover most things..it can be added to as needed.

For power tools..a corded drill, jigsaw and circular saw would be my first choices. All three will run about $200-250 total for decent products. Don't go cheap and you could pass them on to your Grandkids.

Cordless tools can be very convenient, grab and go..but they need to be used more often. The Lithium batteries are better about losing charge. I will be buying some of those when most of my NiCads die.

If you just browse through this topic you will find mucho info....
 
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Old 01-27-10, 11:35 AM
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Hey all, Thanks for the advice, I will be heading to Sears to buy some tools in a hour or so for my bath remodel that I'm doing. I wanted to get your opinion on what minimal Power Tools I will need as I don't want to buy excessive stuff.

First off, I am going with Craftsman (Sears).... I usually buy most appliances/hardware from Sears.

I know I need a drill and a circular saw (cutting hardibacker, plywood). I have to remove the existing sub floor ....... would a circular saw do the job, or do I need a jig-saw/whatever else? Any opinions on laser levels? I will be doing trim work, but I'm not sure I can justify $200 for a miter saw for what seems like a 2-time use...I might just rent this.
Tile Cutter or Tile 7inch Saw? I also need a work bench to hold the plywood/hardibacker/etc that I'll be cutting.


Cordless tools can be very convenient, grab and go..but they need to be used more often
Gunguy45, what do you mean by the last part? I am leaning towards a cordless drill, corded circular saw (want to save some money)

Anything else major power tool that you think I need for a job like this?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 11:54 AM
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sawhorse

Invest in a quality set (or 2) of those. Inexpensive and indespensible.

Much better than trying to balance large sheets of plywood, backerboard and sheetrock on a workbench.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by markiz37 View Post
Invest in a quality set (or 2) of those. Inexpensive and indespensible.

Much better than trying to balance large sheets of plywood, backerboard and sheetrock on a workbench.
Yes, sawhorse! I was trying to remember something else that was not a workbench but ......... that's it. Thanks, I'll add that to my tool list. Yes, it would be much better. Thanks for your input. Since you didn't comment on the tools, can I assume that a drill and circular saw will be good to get started with?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 01:42 PM
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What Vic meant about cordless tools is that they don't fare well if they just set on the shelf. Even though a battery can only be charged and discharged so many times - those times are reduced if the battery just sets for long periods [they won't hold a charge forever] Cordless tools are nice but the battery should be used often - if not buy corded.

A skil [circular] saw is a must have but it is limited to straight cuts, you'll need a jig saw if you need to make any radius cuts or cut out small pieces.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 06:04 PM
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What Vic meant about cordless tools is that they don't fare well if they just set on the shelf. Even though a battery can only be charged and discharged so many times - those times are reduced if the battery just sets for long periods [they won't hold a charge forever] Cordless tools are nice but the battery should be used often - if not buy corded.
Thanks marksr. Hmmm, I see what you are saying and after this bathroom work and then bedroom work, its very possible that the drill could be sitting idle for a period of time.


A skil [circular] saw is a must have but it is limited to straight cuts, you'll need a jig saw if you need to make any radius cuts or cut out small pieces.
Yes, I may need to cut out small circular holes for toilet rings, faucets etc.

quick question ...... could a circular saw be useful for cutting out an old subfloor or would a reciprocating saw (sabre saw......correct?) be a more useful tool.
 
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Old 01-27-10, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by 1sttime_owner View Post
Yes, I may need to cut out small circular holes for toilet rings, faucets etc.
A circular saw is a power tool to cut 2x lumber and plywood/sheet goods. Many times it is called a Skil saw.
Your thinking of a hole saw. Which you could also use a jig saw to cut your round holes.

Originally Posted by 1sttime_owner View Post
quick question ...... could a circular saw be useful for cutting out an old subfloor or would a reciprocating saw (sabre saw......correct?) be a more useful tool.
A circular saw will cut a sub floor fast but only in a straight line. A reciprocating saw can do the same thing but it will be a lot slower. A sabre saw (Jig saw) is another tool all together would not be good for this job as there is no depth of cut adjustment. For cutting a sub floor I would use a circular saw (set to just cut the plywood) and finish up with a recip saw.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:04 AM
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For the real newbies...this can be helpful. Look at the links down at the bottom....all common tools are listed.

Circular saw - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

also

Screw - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
and
Nail (fastener) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Just a way to kill some time and learn something..
 
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Old 01-31-10, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
For the real newbies...this can be helpful. Look at the links down at the bottom....all common tools are listed.
......................
Just a way to kill some time and learn something..
Thanks, I'll bookmark and read this.
 
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