These "New" Oscillating Tools Like the Multimaster

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Old 01-09-10, 08:57 AM
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These "New" Oscillating Tools Like the Multimaster

First, let me say, I'm in home improvement so my tools get used alot.

I've been looking at the Fein Multimaster for a while now. This is quite an expensive tool not to mention the ridiculous prices they put on accessories such as saw blades.

I've looked at alternatives such as the Bosch and Sears versions and Dremmel's Multimax but they're cordless and the reviews typically tell me don't get it due to lack of power and batteries going dead quickly. Everyone seem to say stick with the Multimaster if you're gonna use it alot.

Two questions:
1. Can anyone chime in on maybe someone else making a version of this tool that is close to the quality/power of the Multimaster.

2. Is there anyone making aftermarket accessories for the Multimaster that are a little more affordable?

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-09-10, 10:06 AM
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Welcome to the forums! I was given one as a gift a few weeks ago for work I did at my daughter's house in Denver. Boy was I surprised! It is the 250Q. Waiting to find the perfect trial for it, I was needing to cut a hole for a zip box in 3/8 plywood ceiling in a bay walk out display in a store. Marked it off and was ready to get the jig saw, when my brain lit up. Hey get the Multimaster and try it out! Man, what precision. Never have I had a cut so smooth, quick and effortless.

Like you I have been looking at the others, but once I held this puppy, the others pale. It is midway between a rotozip and a small 4" angle grinder, and balanced really well.

Granted the accessories and blades are priced way out there, but you can find combination sets and the like on Ebay for a reasonable price.

One of our other members uses one as well, so he'll chime in here shortly.
Good luck with your choice!
 
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Old 01-09-10, 11:55 AM
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1). I have not tried the other corded models, I have only seen them, held them in my hands. There is no way they can compare to the quality of the Fein. I have used the Bosch cordless and for a cordless version... I liked it. It doesn't have the power of the Fein but you usually are only making a small cut with them. Depends what you are doing I guess, as to whether you'd want a corded or cordless model. You can't beat the quick change on the Fein, its so fast and easy to change a blade. It also has EVS. (electronic variable speed)

2). Yes, there are aftermarket blades. You can find them by doing a google search for "Fein aftermarket blades". I hesitate to promote any particular site here, due to the rules about advertising.

One thing I will say about these tools is that they are "specialty tools". You wouldn't use one when a reciprocating saw would work better. You wouldn't sand with one if an orbital would work better. But when no other tool will do the job and you need to make a plunge cut and not screw up the surrounding surface, it's invaluable. With the right blade, you can cut through a nail, but not usually more than one- amd the blades are also expensive- even aftermarket blades add up- so you want to avoid nails at all costs, and don't use it if another tool will work better. But it's so much fun to use you can hardly stop yourself. LOL
 
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Old 01-10-10, 08:26 AM
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Great input guys, thanks!
Question on the longevity of the blades. Given I don't hit any nails, and with the understanding there are a lot of variables such as hardness of wood, is there anyway you can estimate how much I can use a wood blade before needing to replace it?

Also, are the after market blades as good as the original Fein blades? (guess this is a loaded question-- like any other blade, you get what you pay for). Possibly someone could PM me with a brand they like?

And yes, I totally agree, use it minimally-- only when it's the only tool that will work.

I'm in the home improvement business and let me tell you, to be able to plunge cut out only the section of baseboard, or crown, I need out rather than popping off the entire run it so worth it! I also do a lot of tile installs and I can see where this tool would be indispensible ie. door jambs, etc.

Thanks,
Joe
 
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Old 01-10-10, 08:31 AM
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Chandler: BTW- thanks for the welcome.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 01:31 PM
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I have to close up a t&g interior and 12" chink siding hole where a heater thimble went in. Since the installer wasn't thinking of uninstalling it, they put it between two sections of the siding and t&g. I, now, have to stagger joints to make it look good. This thing will make those cuts much easier, and precise, eliminating possible overcutting with a circle saw or jigsaw. Can't wait to try it out again.
 
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Old 01-30-10, 05:40 PM
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I use a Rockwell sonicrafter, I find it works very well. If you buy it as a kit, it comes with an adapter so you can use fein or dremmel blades. It has lots of power but is loud. I've never used a multimaster, so I can't compare.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 08:17 AM
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I like to spend as much money on a tool as I plan on using it. That being said I got one at Harbor Freight and it works fine for small jobs. I've used it a few times and couldn't be happier. I needed to cut a piece of 1 1/8" T&G porch flooring out without cutting into the pieces on each side. Another time I needed to cut a hole in plaster and lath and again it worked perfectly, no plaster was disturbed and no lath was pulled away. It's only 1.6 amp so don't expect it to be as fast as the $500 dollar one. At $35 dollars though, all it has to do is save your butt once to make it worth it. With a money back guarantee you've got nothing to loose.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 08:50 AM
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Just for note: the Dremel and the Harbor Freight versions are corded not cordless.

I have used the Fein before and it is a very nice tool. I really like the tool changing system. At $300 though it is hard to drop that kind of cash unless you think you will use it a lot. I would be willing to less than half way and try the Dremel at $100. My local Home Depot has a display to try one out, you might be in luck and have the same thing by you.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 10:49 AM
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I got the Dremel for Xmas and used it renovating a bathroom: undercut door frames, cut out drywall for pipes. Worked very well. For typical home use I can't see the need for spending >3xs for the Fein.
 
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Old 02-02-10, 06:37 PM
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I have the corded Dremel version, no complaints. Not sure about commercial use??

Dave
 
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Old 02-02-10, 06:44 PM
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Good input from everyone. I do think, because I use my tools daily, that spending more for a "professional" level tool can be justified. In this last week alone, I could have used this type of oscillating tool three different times. Plus, I'm quite wary of a cordless model.
 
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Old 02-16-10, 02:18 PM
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Multi-Tool Options

If you have the money, the Fein Multimaster is top quality. It is made for industrial use so the quality can't be beat. However, we have been selling more of the Rockwell Sonicrafters because it is so reasonably priced and works well for most jobs.
Fein for the best quality, Rockwell for the best priced.
 
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Old 02-16-10, 03:14 PM
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The Fein is not a new tool. It has been used for many years in Europe and only recently has been imported into the U.S. I don't know if it is the Germany machine or whether it has been changed for the lower priced U.S. market.

As an example, the cheapest ticket at a reasonable Formula 1 race in Europe is about $300 for one day if you can get one. that is why I watch the speed channel at 6:00 AM every couple of weeks.

Dick
 
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Old 02-17-10, 04:45 AM
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I'd like to hear more from anyone that uses or has used the Rockwell Sonicrafter. I wasn't aware of this model until hearing about it in this thread. The price is certainly right, it's corded (something I definitely want), and Rockwell has been a name to be respected in the past.

Any input? Will the Fein do things the Sonicrafter can't or is the difference in the ruggidness/longevity of the tool?

Thanks!
Joe
 
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Old 02-17-10, 06:49 AM
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Joe, like you I haven't see the Rockwell, but own the Fein. I am waiting for the blade price to stabilize a little. I heard the post that the Rockwell blades will fit the Fein at a considerably lesser cost. Certainly hope so. The Fein will probably last a lifetime. It is three times the size of a Dremel, almost the size of a small grinder, but is not heavy and balances well.
 
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Old 02-17-10, 02:44 PM
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I just got the Harbor Freight variable speed version of this tool. Thought it might be bad (noisy) but it seams to be OK. Tried doing some plunge cutting in oak and pine and it smoked like a mother! (The blade, not the tool) Still cut the hole though. 11K - 20K VPM. Not as nice as the Fein for sure but for $40 (with 20% off coupon) I was willing to give it a try. We'll see how much I use it to see how long it lasts. I really don't like the wrench to change blades but AFAIK Fein is the only tool free change out.
 
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Old 02-18-10, 07:04 AM
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I believe the 250Q in Fein is the only tool free. I think the others require a wrench or allen, not sure. Even the Fein smokes, but it still cuts. Doesn't like oak, but neither does my table saw, so hey! Good deal at 10% the cost of a Fein.
 
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Old 02-18-10, 07:29 AM
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This weeks round of HF Internet coupons is selling the thing for $34.95. Might also have discounted prices on all the blades.

I read a tool review on the thing (maybe from a link in this thread?) and the reviewer(s) panned it on all counts but actual performance. If I had any use for one I'd probably try the HF tool. Sure, I'd love to have the Fein but even if I got one the same way that Chandler got his I doubt I'd actually use it more than once or twice.
 
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Old 02-27-10, 05:10 PM
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Well, l just put the HF one I got to the test. I had to cut some door jambs and trim so I could slip some new tile under it. I must say I'm impressed! It did it with no problems and fairly quickly, although the trim was not that thick. When I was at HD I brought a blade in and matched it to the Dremel one. The blades are NOT the same. Bummer, as HF store would be about 50 miles one way for me. I will compare them to the Rockwell one when I get a chance. I will also note: hearing protection is required! Cutting can be pretty loud cutting trim and running a vac to catch the smoke.
 
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