Ryobi tools any good?

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Old 05-10-10, 05:21 PM
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Ryobi tools any good?

I'm looking for a basic mitre and circular saw. Is Ryobi any good or should I stick with a Rigid or Makita?
 
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Old 05-10-10, 05:43 PM
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For those tools..yes..I'd suggest finding some demo or marked down Rigids (Makita doesn't get much discount normally). PC or similar is also just fine for the circ saw.

Ryobi cordless are pretty good if they are used enough that the batteries don't die...but I feel their corded tools could be built better, lots of plastic in the wrong areas.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 04:47 AM
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I agree with Vic. I use Porter Cable daily and am very satisfied with the performance. Seems as if Ryobi tried to lighten the load with plastic rather than magnesium like PC. Makes for a flimsier tool. Unless you use the tools at least weekly, steer clear of battery operated ones. Every time you go to use it, the battery will be dead, guaranteed. If it is a home shop, go with a corded unit. Your torque will be constant and your power will always be available.
 
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Old 05-11-10, 01:47 PM
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I bought one of those packs of 18V cordless Ryobi tools maybe 7 years ago.

The drill is great I have used it at least 100x and I am completely satisfied.

The circular saw is OK. The blade is too small to cut larger pieces, but in tight spots it works nice when compared to a full size saw. I turned the blade backwards and used it when I put vinyl siding on an addition. That alone made this thing totally worth it.

The light is great, uses DeWalt bulbs and is handy.

The reciprocating saw is 1/2 step above garbage.

I had to replace the batteries once so far. The second set has lasted much longer than the first.


I have a corded Ryobi drill too. I use it rarely...only when my batteries are dead.

Most of my other tools are Porter Cable. And I have a Rigid miter saw.
 
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Old 05-12-10, 02:40 PM
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I'm looking at corded right now. They will be used for a couple of small projects in the near future then sit in the garage for who knows how long... If I can "get away" with something inexpensive but get a clean cut, I might try it.
 
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Old 05-12-10, 05:34 PM
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I think Ryobi is a decent homeowner quality line of tools but they won't stand up to the daily use a pro gives them.

You're going to pay more for Rigid or Porter-Cable but I think they're worth the extra cost. The favorite of the drills I own is a Bosch.
 
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Old 05-12-10, 05:46 PM
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Well...I guess we digressed into cordless tools somewhat. Sorry about that.

I would still look for markdown items....I got a Rigid 10" compound mitre saw with laser for $99 a few years back. Does everything I need as a homeowner.

For a circ saw..I have a recon/discon Skilsaw Classic series that I've had for at least 15 yrs. I prob use it once a year and it, also, is just fine. Ball bearing, thumb operated guard retraction, dust extraction port, etc.....I spent $55. Not too bad.

I just don't like how much (and where) plastic is used in Ryobi corded tools. Their $99 table top saw actually has plastic teeth on the angle and height adjustment mechanism. Its like they designed it for one use and then toss.
 
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Old 05-13-10, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by montyface View Post
I'm looking at corded right now. They will be used for a couple of small projects in the near future then sit in the garage for who knows how long... If I can "get away" with something inexpensive but get a clean cut, I might try it.
I have this one. Nice drill.
Ryobi Power Tools :: 3/8" Variable Speed Clutch Driver
 
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Old 05-20-10, 12:19 PM
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Ryobi Tools

Although there are pros to buying Ryobi, I do have to say that it is very difficult to get parts for Ryobi and it is challenging to find a warranty repair center. Bosch, Makita, Dewalt, PC, and Delta have many more warranty repair centers and parts are easily accessed. Because of these reasons and the chance that you will need repairs....I generally stay away from Ryobi.
 
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Old 05-20-10, 04:56 PM
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Most repair parts for Ryobi are Ridgid, I have found out. I use a Ryobi 10" BTS20 table saw with the fold up wheels, etc. as a jobsite saw. Never had a problem out of this one. It's predecessor is in my barn with a burned out motor. Saw $199, New Motor $89, not worth the trouble. They are basically disposable.
 
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Old 05-20-10, 06:30 PM
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I bought a cheap table saw when I was building a boat to rip half inch strips twenty feet long to laminate into a hull. I got about 2/3rds of the way done with that task and the motor burned out.

I got that replaced under warranty and ripped the rest of the strips. That was a lot of sawing. They may have given me a new saw ---I can't remember.
 
 

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