Draining a pancake compressor - TILT?

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Old 10-17-10, 09:22 AM
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Draining a pancake compressor - TILT?

I have a Porter Cable C2001 pancake-style oilless air compressor. The manual says to simply open the bottom tank valve to drain moisture. Can anyone tell me if the unit should also be tilted to move water toward the drain valve? Or is the interior of the tank is designed to move water toward the valve?

If it needs to be tilted it affects how the unit could be mounted in a shop or vehicle.

If it needs to be tilted, why the heck don't they put the valve at the bottom?
 
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Old 10-17-10, 11:21 AM
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Draining Compressor

Drain with compressor level. With the valve still open, tilt and see if more water comes out.
 
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Old 10-17-10, 11:22 AM
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If you drain the tank while there is some pressure it should pull most of the water out.
Air receiver tanks are designed to be constantly damp/wet anyway, draining prevents a loss of volume and accumulation of sludge.

Because it is oil less you could install shims under two legs if you like.
 
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Old 10-18-10, 11:02 AM
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I never worry about whether the drain is in the exact bottom, the amount of water left behind would be minimal IMO based on the pressure involved when the drain is opened on the tank
 
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Old 10-08-11, 08:31 PM
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I know this is an old thread, but I don't seen anything newer. Anyhow, I've been using my PC pancake compressor for a couple years. It sits level on a shelf and I fully open the drain valve after each use. I always get a mist of moisture, but today I lost pressure from a leak that's been progressively getting worse, so I took it off the shelf and increased and released the pressure as I attempted to locate the leak. When I finished, I still had some pressure draining from the drain valve when I moved it back to the shelf. As I moved it (tilted it) A LOT, at least a half cup of water, drained out.

I'm not sure what's going on, but tilting it drained a lot of water that had obviously been sitting in the tank for some time. Just FYI.

(still researching)
 
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Old 10-10-11, 08:05 AM
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Hmm...

I'm going to have to try that.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 05:07 PM
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To answer one of the older questions as to why the drain is not on the bottom....the drain valve won't fit, you will hit it everytime you set it down, and you can't get to it if it is on the bottom.
RickDel, your valve may have had a piece of trash caught in the opening for a short period of time, until all the high pressure went away...it dislodged and you got more water out.
I use a Ridgid double hotdog compressor with drains on the front edge of both hot dogs. Makes it easy to drain and if you need to tilt it, it is somewhat balanced.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 07:34 PM
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To some of the puzzled responses about why this is a problem, whether it's on a shelf with limited space or on the floor, it strikes me as an unecessary pain to have to tilt/retilt/spin trying to get the drain to the sweet spot at the bottom where all the water drains.

There must be a better way to design these things, like simply raising the legs enought so the drain can be placed dead center at the bottom. That way you could just open the valve and gravity would take care of it. You wouldn't put the drain on a sink anywhere other than the topographic lowest point, right? Unless you like tilting sinks, right?

I did find this topic in an online manual and it says it needs to be tilted so all water drains properly or the interior will rust, causing death and/or destruction. Why this design persists, I don't know.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 07:45 PM
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BTW, I've experimented and opening the valve without tilting definitely does not get rid of all water. If I do that, let it sit for a week, then pressure back up and tilt to drain, it will release a substantial amount of rusty water under the machine. So it's staying in there even with the valve left open, and it's causing internal rust.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 08:51 PM
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I did find this topic in an online manual and it says it needs to be tilted so all water drains properly or the interior
Guess I learned this the hard way. Now I know! Thanks.
 
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Old 10-10-11, 09:05 PM
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My little Emglo HC4V also has the petcock about 20 up the side of the tank. I always have to rock it to get all the water out. I suppose it is to prevent it from getting beat up. Although mine still gets beat up where it's currently at... so... ???

That reminds me... I should probably change the oil in that thing. I do it at least once every other year, whether it needs it or not.
 
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Old 10-11-11, 06:17 AM
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Originally Posted by suobs View Post
To some of the puzzled responses about why this is a problem, whether it's on a shelf with limited space or on the floor, it strikes me as an unecessary pain to have to tilt/retilt/spin trying to get the drain to the sweet spot at the bottom where all the water drains.
The thing is, that compressor is built to be a movable compressor. It's expected to be carted from job to job and for most, tilting it to drain all the water isn't a problem. The big 60 and 80 gallon compressors do have the petcock at the very bottom. Even my old sears 11 gal compressor [with wheels] benefits from tipping it when removing the water.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 08:48 PM
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I also have a Porter Cable pancake air compressor but can't seem to get it to drain.

Is the screw supposed to come all of the way out? It only seems to loosen to a point and then it tightens back up as if it's not meant to come the rest of the way out.

I don't want to force it and break it but I also don't want to allow it to start rusting inside.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 09:09 PM
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Welcome to our forums!

The model number would help......maybe even a picture of what you are talking about.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 10:20 PM
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Is the screw supposed to come all of the way out? It only seems to loosen to a point and then it tightens back up as if it's not meant to come the rest of the way out.
Only turns a little ways and isn't meant to come out. Won't drain unless there's some pressure in it. Hard to turn when under full pressure so I usually pull the pressure relief valve (split ring near guages) first, then you should be able to finger-turn the drain valve near bottom.

If I remember right counterlclockwise closes the drain, clockwise opens it.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 10:30 PM
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BTW another gem from the manual: the mfr recommends these units should be "retired" after a few years because apparently rust is inevitable and it will weaken the air tank. Result is death and/or destruction. Even when maintained (drained) properly.

If you haven't been draining or properly draining (i.e. tilting), the process of interior rusting is probably accellerated a lot.
 
 

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