Circular saw blades - best manufacturers to buy


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Old 05-11-11, 04:47 PM
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Circular saw blades - best manufacturers to buy

I just recently bought my first circular saw (a Dewalt DW364K). I've read through the manual and various websites so I don't take my leg off the first day. I'm ready to give it a go and would like to know who makes the best blades for cutting plywood and lumber (2x4). This will only be used around the house.

Thanks,

Andy
 
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Old 05-11-11, 05:18 PM
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Saw Blades

Before we talk about brands, we need to discuss blade types. Circular saw blades are of different types for different jobs. Generally, a coarse blade (fewer teeth) is for cross-cutting(cutting across the grain) of dimensional lumber(such as 2x4's). Finer blades(more teeth) are used for cutting plywood or other sheet goods.

The pros will expand on this with specific recommendations.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 05:27 PM
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From someone who uses theirs the same way....you can pretty much use any blade brand. Not the super cheap steel blades...but any carbide tipped blade will prob do just fine. Just use the appropriate blade for the material you are cutting.

Your manual should explain what blade is the best for the task. It probably came with a combo blade which for occasional use is fine...but if you'll be doing a lot of one type of cuts..it makes sense to get one specific to the task.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 07:19 PM
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Andy, as the others have mentioned, it isn't so much the brand name, but the type of blade you use. You will probably go through a couple or three blades in a year if you work hard at it. I go through that many in a week, so I have to buy what the market will bear. In my shop (controlled environment) I use Freud and Bosch blades, among others. I mention those two brands to get you started on your search. On my jobsite trailer I get my guys Diablo, Irwin, Dewalt or Oldham blades. And only if they buy my lunch on Friday.
 
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Old 05-12-11, 06:54 AM
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I plan on building a storage cabinet for our utility room, and if I get real ambitious (and the wife allows ) I'll build some "storage shelves" for the bedroom walk-in closet. So, I'll be doing both ripping and crosscutting. Is there a blade I can use for both, or is it best to buy two separate blades?

The blade that came with the saw says "18 carbide teeth" and "fast cut framing", so I take it this would be good for cross-cuts, right?

Also, how many teeth should the blade have if I want a clean cut for a cabinet? I looked at HD and they have some with 140 teeth. I have read to keep the good side down when making the cut, so I'll be sure to do that (and maybe even score the top side with a utility knife to minimize the splintering).

Thanks,

Andy
 

Last edited by hikerguy; 05-12-11 at 07:12 AM.
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Old 05-12-11, 06:21 PM
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140 tooth on a 7 1/4" blade??? Must be a plywood blade. A good 40 tooth carbide blade will give adequate service for cross cutting and ripping. Let the saw do the work. If you have a cut where chipping must be zero, like the bottom of a door, mark the cut with a pencil, then score the cut line with a razor knife. Then cut on the waste side of the score. You won't have any splintering.
 
 

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