Accu Rip Circular Saw Guide - Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down?


  #1  
Old 07-13-11, 01:11 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CO
Posts: 618
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Accu Rip Circular Saw Guide - Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down?

While browsing videos on the net for DIY rip guides I saw a video showing the Accu Rip guide (available at HD).

Is this something that the casual DIY user might find beneficial or a product that leaves a lot to be desired?
 
  #2  
Old 07-13-11, 03:59 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 8 Posts
I move too fast (for an old guy) to be fitting and unfitting my circle saw to a rip guide. I figured that's why I have a table saw. Even if I need to cut larger pieces of board, I can "rough" cut them 1/4" long and finish them on the table saw. I couldn't in good conscience give any thumbs up on it.
BUT, if you see a need for it in your plans, it does appear to be a well made product for the price.
 
  #3  
Old 07-14-11, 05:30 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,334
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
When I have to rip something that is too big or unhandy for my table saw I'll often clamp a 1x to the wood and use it as a fence........ not that I'd try to talk someone out of buying more tools
 
  #4  
Old 07-14-11, 06:50 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,919
Received 55 Likes on 48 Posts
Ripping

I use a small table saw to rip narrow stock.

For ripping a sheet of plywood lengthwise, I clamp an 8 ft. straight edge to the stock and use it as a guide for my circular saw. Just my 2 cents.
 
  #5  
Old 07-14-11, 07:16 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,575
Likes: 0
Received 15 Likes on 13 Posts
When I was in the business I hardly went a day with out using a circular saw rip guide. I had a hard and fast rule never buy a circular saw unless I could get a rip guide to fit it. However I'm not familiar with the one you posted. I always just use the ones that fit in the shoe slots.

I seen a few alleged pros using a hooked thumb and the results were wavy as hades.
 
  #6  
Old 07-14-11, 08:27 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,337
Received 1,628 Likes on 1,461 Posts
I don't think I have used that particular brand but I have used similar and found it to be more trouble than it was worth. I use the guide that comes with my saws for narrow 1"-6" strips but when trying to use a similar guide out much further it easier to tilt the saw and get a wavy line so I clamp a guide board/bar to the material I'm ripping.
 
  #7  
Old 07-14-11, 08:52 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,532
Received 42 Likes on 38 Posts
Patience is what most contractors don't and can't have, time is money, so cut it and move on. They also have enough practice, experience, and tools to do a great job when needed and a fast good job when not. If your work will allow the time, you can't beat set-up.

I needed to finish cut the bottom of a bunch of doors and running them through the table saw wouldn't work. So I mounted a longer piece of 3/4 to the bottom of my circular as a new base so it would provide a steady guide and clamped a straight edge where needed. Prep took some time, but once set-up, the job went fast and the results were perfect.

As for the guide mentioned, the story above was very successful because the guiding surfaces were long and stable. Extending a guide out 16" to the side of the circular, IMO, would present a lot of binding problems. 4 or 5" not bad, but when you get way out there she is going to bind so be prepared to hang on and kiss your cut goodby. As I said, my opinion.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 07-14-11, 02:05 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,334
Received 702 Likes on 619 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
I seen a few alleged pros using a hooked thumb and the results were wavy as hades.
I have worked behind a few carpenters that had that 'hooked thumb' for a guide and was always amazed at how good they did. Personally, I can't master it and since most of my carpentry work is done at home - I'll stick with my table saw
 
  #9  
Old 07-14-11, 03:26 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,575
Likes: 0
Received 15 Likes on 13 Posts
Of course the big thing is a sharp blade. I have see carpet layers cutting off the bottom of doors with a blade so dull it almost took two of them to push the blade through.... no guide either. Geeze just looking at the bottom of the door would have made a sailor seasick it was so wavy.
 
  #10  
Old 07-14-11, 06:12 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 8 Posts
I can, and have done the finger thingy. I use my index finger doubled back. I also use a left handed saw, so it can make a difference. I don't do it often, because of the cheap wood we are forced to work with nowadays will splinter too easily and the splinters wind up in my finger
 
  #11  
Old 07-16-11, 11:00 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: CO
Posts: 618
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
I appreciate all the replies.

So I bought one at Lowes (satisfaction guarantee plus veteran discount) and gave it a try. I have six sheets of plywood that need to be ripped to a 36-inch width.

It took a lot of fiddle-farting to attach the guide to my Dewalt due to the ribbing on the top of the foot. But after relocating the bevel adjustment clamp to clear the rip guide, I made my first rip down the long edge of a sheet of plywood. Worked great! Except I was 1/16 off because I forgot to include the blade width in the setup.

I found that when the guide is attached to the saw, it's a hassle to find somewhere to put the saw between cuts.

I took the guide off and put it back on a couple hours later. Still a hassle. The clamped guide method began to look more and more appealing. And cheaper! And more versatile. So I made an 8-foot rip guide custom-set to my saw by using the methods in videos that I found on the internet. Penciled my cut line, clamped the guide in place and let 'er rip (bad pun, I know).

Then I put the Accu-Rip guide back into its packaging and will return it in a couple of days, and get my $30 back.

And the OL will be happy about that .

.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: