How can I disassemble my Ryobi drill?


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Old 07-31-11, 04:48 PM
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How can I disassemble my Ryobi drill?

Hi there,

I was driving screws into some treated pine sleepers when my Ryobi hammer/impact drill began smoking. There were some sparks visible inside and it was also spitting out small fragments (not sure what they were???).

The drill still works, but the motor sounds weaker now.

Is it worth trying to repair? It originally cost less than $100 over a year ago but (silly me) I cannot find the receipt anywhere, so exchanging the unit is out of the question.

I tried to open the unit last night. I unscrewed all of the screws on the housing assembly, but was not able to separate the two halves of the assembly. I guess I could try with more force, but donít want to risk breaking anything.

Any ideas on how to disassemble these things?

In Australia, the model is Ryobi EID1000RE hammer drill (240V - 50Hz , 900W. Drill speed:No: 0-1000 / 0 - 3000rpm. Hammer: No: 0-16000/ 0-48000 rpm).

The D552H is the identical-looking model in the USA. The repair sheet and manual are on this page:

Ryobi Power Tools :: 2-Speed 1/2" Hammer Drill

Cheers,
Pete
 
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Old 08-01-11, 03:09 PM
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Hi again,

I finally managed to open the drill after removing the handle.

Below are photos of drill's internals. I guess it looks like the field has melted due to overheating?

Worth trying to repair? The thing cost me about $100 so I guess that's the question. BTW, I asked at the store and they said that a receipt is needed as proof of purchase.

Cheers,
Pete











 
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Old 08-01-11, 03:49 PM
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Hi Pete,
I wasn't able to contribute, but read your post. I have dug into many more machines than I ever should have, but telling someone else to pry and hope it doesn't break isn't good. Glad you got it apart. Do you have a source and a price?

Bud
 
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Old 08-01-11, 05:22 PM
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You will find Ryobi veeerrrry expensive on replacement parts, especially stators. I have a portable table saw where the motor did as yours did. Cost of saw $199.....cost of motor parts $199. Anyone need a hamster run table saw ???
 
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Old 08-02-11, 03:58 PM
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Hi there,

Thanks for the replies. Some local tool repair shops said it's not worth repairing. I ended up buying this thing for just under $100. Since I won't need to use this type of tool very often, I couldn't really justify the cordless ones for 3x the price.

230W MAKITA TD0101F Impact Driver - Bunnings Warehouse

First, I'm using another drill to drill out the pilot holes into the pine, and then using the above impact driver to drive home the batten scews. Working just fine. I feel much more confident with the Makita doing the work, compared to the Ryobi... but I will make sure to give the tool a rest every so often, to avoid it overheating, etc.

Cheers,
Pete
 
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Old 08-02-11, 05:21 PM
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Pete, I've switched to Makita cordless impact drivers for jobsite work. I've got two as well as a drill. Had to buy the second one, because the first one was always "gone" when I started to work. One of my helpers would always commandeer it. I don't think you will go wrong with the corded version, at all.
 
 

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