Good but not expensive draw knife?

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Old 09-28-11, 03:57 PM
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Good but not expensive draw knife?

I recently started making wood spoons and it seems the best way to shape the handles is a draw knife. Some of these are pretty pricey - does anyone know of a well-made brand that doesn't cost an arm and leg? I'd appreciate any and all suggestions.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 05:28 AM
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Aieeee! I see what you mean. I just popped on Rocklers and they want $85 for theirs, and they aren't even gold plated! I guess I'd better take mine out of the tool box and wrap it up better! I would guess an estate sale or flea market would be your best bet. Most times old non standard tools will go for a song.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 09:12 AM
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Doc - Google draw knives and you'll find quite a few sources. I saw some on Amazon for around $40. Would a spokeshave be a better tool for your purpose? Highlandwoodworking. I have no idea of the quality of these.

If you are handy you can make your own. I have two that were made by my grandfather a long time ago. They are made from a scythe blade. I have made knives from a car leaf spring, you could probably use one of those to make a draw knife.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 09:33 AM
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Not that I need any competition, but I just happen to be looking for a draw knife as well. Finding good prices on old ones on eBay. Ones in usable condition for about $20 with shipping. Just don't bid on one that I am. :P
 
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Old 09-29-11, 09:47 AM
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Not a woodworker but Lee Valley seems to have a nice selection of stuff.
 
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Old 09-29-11, 07:55 PM
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Wow - all great ideas. Thanks, guys. I know what a spokeshave is, but had never even thought about one for this. Now I'm stuck - gee thanks

In any event, I'll check out these places. Maybe I can get this for less than $50. Or better yet - ask my family to get me one for Christmas!!
 
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Old 09-30-11, 07:37 AM
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For spoons a spoke-shave might be the better option. I'm pealing logs so I need a bigger blade. I played around a bit last night using a machete and that seams to work pretty good. Just need to have a glove on the blade hand.
 
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Old 10-01-11, 05:31 AM
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A machete? I bet that was fun - with the glove,of course

Been doing some reading on spokeshaves - they look perfect for the job. Now I have two additional questions of you all -

1) It looks like I should be a concave spokeshave for the handles - is that correct? Is round the same thing? I'm pretty sure I don't want convex.

2) Right now, to work on the spoon end, I've been using round wood ball-like things (wood pulls?) with spray adhesive and sandpaper. Not bad for finishing, but a bear for initially working the shape. what's a better tool?

Thanks!!
 
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Old 10-01-11, 08:34 AM
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Quick update - was in HD this morning and ran across a set of wood carving gouges. I'm going to give them a try on my spoons. I'm also going to put a spokeshave on my Christmas wish list. I'll let you all know how this works out.....
 
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Old 10-02-11, 08:01 AM
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Well,that little experiment was short-lived. Turns out what I bought was a set of wood carving tools. The way the ends of the tools were designed there was no way to scoop out wood. Should have known. I guess I need to keep searching.....
 
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Old 10-02-11, 01:55 PM
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Peeling Logs

I'm pealing logs so I need a bigger blade
When we built fences using locust posts, I peeled the posts with a single blade axe by holding the back of the axe head in my "working hand", holding the end of the handle in the other hand for support, and pushing the axe blade along to strip the bark from the log.
 
 

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