Any ideas on how to lift a wood stove into an SUV

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Old 03-15-12, 04:27 PM
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Any ideas on how to lift a wood stove into an SUV

I have a heavy wood stove insert that I need to lift off the garage floor and put into my SUV. It weighs about 500 pounds. The flat back area of the SUV is 30" off the ground. I have a Hyundai Santa Fe and the back door swings upwards.

I've looked at everything Harbor Freight (winches, hoists, lifts, cranes) sells but nothing quite seems to fit what I'm trying to do.

I once rented a "material lift" which could do the job but I need to move this several times over the next few weeks and would like to buy/make/retrofit something inexpensive that would do the job forever.

I tried a wood 8' 2x6 and laid it across the front seats with about 1' extending outside each door. I attached a $30. Harbor Freight winch to the 2x6 but then discovered the center console was in the way.

I was hoping to put something together that would cost no more than $150. Any ideas would be appreciated.
 
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Old 03-15-12, 05:24 PM
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It probably won't happen. The 500 lbs will translate to axle or tire failure of the vehicle in all probability, so be aware of the vehicle's capability. These boogers are heavy. I only move them using a front end loader or a boom lift on my tractor. The last one we moved I had it put on my Dodge Ram 3500 flatbed, and it was a noticeable weight. I can only imagine in an SUV. Can I ask why you will need to be moving this thing several times of the next few weeks? For me, once would be plenty. Whatever you rent on one end, you will need on the other end. Like a loading machine, etc.
 
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Old 03-15-12, 05:41 PM
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My Hyundai says it can hold 900 pounds. I need to move it first from one house to another, then leave it outside to paint, have a series of small fires to cure the paint outside, then move it inside to test it out in my fireplace which entails moving the existing one out and back to the other house. If it doesn't work well, I will then move it to a local store as charity.

Harbor Freight seems to be the only place that sells hoists, winches, etc. inexpensively. They have a lift table but it costs $250. and only goes down to 9". I've seen photos of hydraulic hand trucks---that would be the ticket but I don't want to spend 1K. Too bad Harbor Freight doesn't make one of those. Basically, a hand truck with a hoist attached.
 
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Old 03-15-12, 07:22 PM
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Have you looked at an engine hoist. It might cost a bit more up front, but if you sell it when done you are only out the difference.

Bud
 
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Old 03-16-12, 06:35 AM
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This may be a good excuse to buy a small trailer. Put the stove on a dolly and roll it up into the trailer.
 
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Old 03-16-12, 10:20 AM
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I'm pretty sure that 900 pounds your Hyundai can carry needs to be evenly distributed and more likely as not includes fuel and passengers.

I agree with Pilot that a trailer makes much more sense but I would rent one unless you have an ongoing need for a small trailer. I suspect that lifting it is really the least of your worries if you know anything about moving heavy objects. I would probably use a small floor jack to lift one corner or you may be able to do so by just using a lever or ever trying to tilt the thing backwards and then slip a 2x6 under it. Raise the other end and slide the 2x6 under that and do the same for the other side. Best if you can actually fasten the 2x6 in place but not absolutely necessary. From there you keep raising one corner at a time and "crib" up using 2x4s or 4x4s until you achieve the necessary height. Remember to criss-cross the cribbing to keep it stable. Once you have it at the right height you then use a couple of 2x10s as planks and slip pipe rollers under the first 2x6s and simply roll the thing onto the trailer. If it starts to fall DO NOT try to stop it but get out of the way. This method, if done carefully, can move almost anything.
 
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Old 03-16-12, 03:21 PM
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This method, if done carefully, can move almost anything
Pyramid blocks for example We had one on a lower deck and had to bring it to grade level, probably another 10'. Impossible to do by hand. Gas guys were there delivering a propane tank and I copped them lunch money to cable it up for us. That hoist grunted and growled bringing it up, so it must have been quite heavy, as they had just delivered a full propane tank on the opposite side of the house with no problem.
 
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Old 03-16-12, 07:26 PM
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It was maybe thirty years ago that I bought an 80 gallon electric water heater from the utility I once worked for, yes, I got the employee discount. I brought it home in my daddy's truck and was able to slide it down to the ground without problem. My dear sweet wife looked at it and said, "How do you plan on getting it into the utility room? You're going to need lots of help."

I replied, "Nope, I'll get it in there and up on the platform all by myself and within a half-hour." She started one of her tirades and I asked her to please leave me alone after which she stormed into the house.

I "walked" the heater to the door of the utility room, the floor of which was about a foot higher than the garage floor. I then rocked the heater back and forth cribbing it with short 2x4s until it was slightly higher than the utility room floor. I then tipped it and walked it over the threshold and then walked it to the wooden platform that was about 14 inches above the floor where I again tipped and cribbed until it was slightly higher than the platform and walked it over. Probably didn't even take the full 30 minutes. Eighteen years later, but this time with no wife () I did it again.

I once had a large metal lathe that probably weighed in the neighborhood of 1000 pounds. I moved that machine all over the garage with nothing more than two, 2x10s, a floor jack and a five-foot bar. I've done a fair amount of other machinery moving in years past using the same techniques and never had a problem.
 
 

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