Drill Press Vise or similar

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Old 06-18-12, 09:19 AM
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Drill Press Vise or similar

I'm looking for some ideas as well as what you guys use as a drill press vise.

My wife bought me a new Ryobi drill press for father's day / to make some items she sells on her site.

The first project requires a 1/2" rod to be cut in 1 1/4" lengths and hollowed out (1" deep).
For this project, I am getting a buddy of mine to tack weld a 1/2" nut to a 1/16" thick plate which I will clamp down to the drill press table. Fairly simple setup and should make producing 30+ pieces fairly easy.

For some of the other projects, I may not be so lucky with a simple setup, so I'm looking to see what others are using for a vise on their drill press.

If I was to get an actual press vise, any recommendations on brand, type that won't empty the bank acount?
 
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Old 06-18-12, 11:08 AM
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Just remember you pay for what you get.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by gosserwb
Just remember you pay for what you get.
True, but I do not need the supercar of vises when the entry level domestic will do just fine.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 01:05 PM
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I would say get a vice commensurate with the quality of your drill press. There is no sense getting a expensive, high quality vice for a $150 drill press. I would go with a basic vice unless you think you will often need to position parts and an angle. I would stay away from a milling vice unless you want it to just play with in wood.

If you want quality I would look at a Wilton brand. They have several models that are less than $100 or you can go for an imported equivalent for 1/3 the price. Of course there is a difference in the quality. I have a imported one that's OK for crude work but the moving jaw like to ride up slightly when clamping some parts which throws off the positioning a bit. My Wilton is the same size and magically seems to clamp parts twice as hard with the same force tightening the handle and the moving jaw has very little slop or free play which is very beneficial when clamping round parts.



 
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Old 06-18-12, 06:11 PM
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Dane duplicated my thoughts. This type vice, simple as it is, can be used to "micrometer" the rods and hold them in perfect alignment without your fingers becoming part of the picture. I use a machinist's vice with micrometer adjustments for all the push and pull stuff. Very accurate for woodwork.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 04:15 AM
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What Pilot showed is a basic necessity and the one below can also be pretty handy.

Click image:

Image courtesy of harborfreight.com

It allows you to firmly attach the vice to the table and fine tune the position.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 05:29 AM
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GregH,

That is a sweet looking piece. Too bad that exact model is sold out.

I definately like the 2-way setup as I have noticed my press is a hair off center (bit is a bit closer to the stand then the table hole).
The 2-way adjustment would make fine tuning a lot easier when it comes to hollowing out threaded rod or similar.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 05:38 AM
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The milling type vice that GregH showed can be extremely handy. There is nothing like turning the knob a bit to properly position a part. If you have a bench top drill press (I don't know if Ryobi makes a full size one) you probably only have 10 or 12" swing (room between the chuck and platform). The milling type vice is quite tall and can eat up a lot of your available work area. Not a big deal on a floor standing model but something to keep in mind with a bench drill press especially with longer drill bits. Milling vices also rely on the platform to securely lock in place. If the platform cannot stay firmly in place the mill type vice is very limited.

I know it sounds like I'm against milling vices I'm not. They can be incredibly handy. Even though you have a drill press it opens the ability to do some light milling. If you want to get extravagant you can find out what spindle you have on your drill press and use arbors to hold milling bits or for most jobs you can just chuck up a milling bit in your drill chuck and easily mill most woods, aluminum if you are careful and steel if you are lucky, careful and have a sturdy platform on your drill press.
 
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Old 06-19-12, 06:02 AM
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Pilot Dane,

You are correct about the space issue. Ryobi does make a floor and workbench model.
I picked up the workbench model as it was on sale (half price) and for the project I am working on (which will pay for it), it was all that is needed.
This is what my press looks like;
 
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Old 06-19-12, 03:23 PM
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The one I have is a bit more simple than the one I linked to.
If you have a smaller drill press it may be a better fit for your table.

Click image:

Image courtesy of princessauto.com
 
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Old 06-20-12, 05:27 AM
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I picked up a cheaper 3" vise last night before heading home. Unfortunately there is no way to mount the the damn thing as I can only bolt it with one bolt if I want to actually use it without having th shim everything in the vise.
Going to bring it back and look at a bigger vise and possibly one like GregH had posted.
 
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Old 06-22-12, 07:32 AM
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Tried a simple 5" similar to the 3" vise. I couldn't even get one hole to line up and the vise be usable.
What a pain this is. Will probably take the plate off and bring it with me to see if I can find anything that will actually fit.
 
 

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