question about replacing electric motor on compressor

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-28-12, 10:47 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
question about replacing electric motor on compressor

I have an old Fliteway 20 gallon hot dog air compressor. Everything seems to work fine, but the specs plate on the motor is missing and I cannot find any info about it. The only problem I have is it tripping the 15 amp breaker in my house. I am wondering if I replace the motor to a higher hp motor if there will be any issues or if it would be better that way as it is set from the factory at 150 psi and is intended to be used for almost any pneumatic including paint guns. I figure the current motor is 1.5 hp but I was thinking about a 3 hp.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-29-12, 03:17 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Why increase the horsepower? You won't get more air, and it won't build any faster. I would try to find the specs on the compressor online or somewhere and use a motor of the same size. Is yours rotary vane or piston compressor?
 
  #3  
Old 06-29-12, 04:28 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
Do you have a 20 amp circuit you can use? I don't know the specs for your compressor but my old craftsman 1hp 11 gallon compressor doesn't like 15 amp circuits.
 
  #4  
Old 12-09-12, 09:32 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well, it has been awhile since I posted to this, but I did finally figure out most of the issues on it. It turns out that the motor is a Dayton single phase, still unsure of the hp as it has also thrown a 20 amp breaker once in awhile. From what I can gather it was built by Grainger for Fliteway as I purchased an old Speedaire without the motor and they looked exactly the same. I have overcome the problems of the breaker throwing by adding on an additional tank giving me a total of 50 gallons so it does not have to run near as often, plus someone gave me another 30 gallon craftsman tank which he will be bringing by soon.Also, it is a 2 cylinder single stage. The reason for thinking about a higher hp motor was also to change the pump motor since I am running multiple tanks now.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-12, 02:03 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 58,613
Received 1,046 Votes on 970 Posts
The reason for thinking about a higher hp motor was also to change the pump motor since I am running multiple tanks now.
So what is your question ? Should you increase the HP of the motor ?

You would increase the HP of the motor if it the old one was running extremely hot and having a hard time driving the compressor. A bigger motor will not give you more air. A bigger motor will also require a larger power supply.

If I were replacing the motor I would consider something that ran on 240 volts.
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-13, 05:06 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I spoke with Grainger recently, as I got a 1.5 hp Dayton Farm Duty motor from a friend. Downside is it is 1725 RPM, but Grainger said just to put a bigger pulley on it to compensate as it is rated for constant use so it will be ok to run all of the time. I do plan to run 240 volts on it, first have to finish running the new wiring to a subpanel as I got a deal on some 2-2-2-4 direct burial to run instead of running 10 gauge. 30 feet for the cost of 15, couldn't complain
 
  #7  
Old 01-20-13, 07:46 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 58,613
Received 1,046 Votes on 970 Posts
The only problem is......
If you increase the pulley size on the motor....yes the compressor speed will be increased... but so will the load on the motor. Possibly to the point where it might not even start.
 
  #8  
Old 01-20-13, 09:30 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 31
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
yes, you have a valid point, one that I was concerned about too. However, Grainger told me it should work fine and said that even if I left the regular pulley on it, since it is rated for constant use it should not overheat the motor to run all of the time. Of course, the downside would be that I would always run low on air pressure when using my die grinder.

I plan to swap it out soon just to see how it works, and if it does not work as well, then swap it back and use it on a squirrel cage fan, or as a spare for my table saw.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: