Running air tools on 150' hose - does 5 gallon air tank help?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-24-12, 08:01 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,936
Received 137 Votes on 119 Posts
Running air tools on 150' hose - does 5 gallon air tank help?

Anybody run their tools off a small portable air tank at the end of a long hose?
Curious if an old junkyard trick actually works for the home workshop...
I can see why you'd need a local reservoir for a junkyard's 1/2" impact gun running at the end of 200' or 300' of quick connected hoses.

I'm curious if it would help at 150' for common workshop tools.
Does connecting a 5 gallon air tank at the end and running tools off the air tank significantly help tool performance?

My situation is, compressor is in garage workshop, have a basement work area 120 feet away.
Numbers are:9 cfm / 90psi compressor with 150' of 3/8 hose, want to run standard air tools in the 4-11 cfm range.

Layout would be:
-air ratchet quick connected to 3' 3/8 hose on 5 gallon tank,
-tank quick connected to 100' 3/8 hose,
-100' hose quick connected to 50' 3/8 hose
-50' hose is screwed into manifold on 60 gallon air tank.

Would a 5 gallon air tank as a local reservoir make a noticeable benefit for high cfm tools or high pressure tools?



(Yes, I'm aware that a 2nd tank is less effective for low pressure tools...
I guess I could put quick connects on the pressure regulator and move it to the 60 gallon or the 5 gallon tank as needed.)
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 12-24-12 at 09:44 AM.
  #2  
Old 12-24-12, 09:55 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,824
Received 1,330 Votes on 1,229 Posts
Good question.....and here at DIY you'll get a ton of answers. Most different.

That 5 gallon tank would be most effective for things like an impact gun that need short bursts of air.
High pressure type demands. Yes it would be noticeable.

As for long drawn out demands the tank will be of little use.

The single biggest improvement you can make is to increase the line size between compressor and shop.
 
  #3  
Old 12-25-12, 10:26 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Air pressure at the end of a hose, no matter the length is the same. Volume is determined by the tank size. As PJ said, the smaller compressor set up is ideal for impact nailers, etc. I use a double hotdog Ridgid and sometimes two 100' hoses, and it never hiccups.
Rotary or air hog items will definitely require more volume, and larger hose will help with them. My hoses are only 1/4", as I don't require the volume.
 
  #4  
Old 12-25-12, 12:41 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,433
Received 749 Votes on 688 Posts
When I built my house I got one basement room lockable and put a compressor inside and ran hose to the rest of the house. Because of the house layout I had 100' of 1/2" hose much of the time and 150' quite often. Framing, roofing and trim nail guns all ran without trouble and no reservoir near the end.

I don't think a reservoir near your work area would hurt but I don't think it's needed. If you were using a small tubing like 1/4" for your long run then I might consider having the reservoir closer to the work area with 1/2" hose to the tool.
 
  #5  
Old 12-25-12, 12:58 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 4,946
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You don't need much volume for nailers. When you use tools that have motors driven by air, you need volume. Having a long hose with a small diameter is going to affect volume delivery. The size of the tank at the start of the hose isn't going to matter if you can't deliver the volume of air through the hose itself. I think PJmax hit the nail on the head. If you need short bursts of air for an impact gun, then having the small tank at the end of the hose will help. But if you need to run air sanders on it, 5-gallons may not be big enough.
 
  #6  
Old 12-25-12, 05:16 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 748
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Tough to say

Depends on what you are planning to throw at that ratchet. If pushed to the limit, the extra volume will help. If you are just running down some 1/4 nuts, don't bother, it'll do fine without the tank.
 
  #7  
Old 12-26-12, 06:52 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
One more note. My former BIL painted cars for a living and although I had a 26 gallon compressor in my garage, he installed another 20 gallon third air tank from a tractor trailer in line to give him the volume he needed for painting my car for me. I'm no expert at painting, but it worked for him.
 
  #8  
Old 12-31-12, 01:45 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,936
Received 137 Votes on 119 Posts
Tools on 150' of 3/8" hose - solution - use 3/8" npt fittings...

Figured I'd post some results-
Switching to 3/8" quick connects gives enough airflow to not need a reserve tank.

First- with 150' of 3/8 hose, the pressure regulator at the compressor, and 1/4" npt quick connects, tools at the end of the line are serviceable, but there is a loss of power. Tested small air chisel- on an on old brass faucet, it took about 30 seconds to cut a distinct line into the brass

Second- same setup, but putting the pressure regulator at the end of the line (e.g. 150' hose @ 120psi, versus 120' @ 90 psi) was a slight improvement.
Took about 30 seconds to cut down into the inside of the brass pipe.

Third, same setup as #2, but switching to 3/8" npt quick connects made a big improvement. First trigger pull punched through the brass pipe.

Trick was to use the biggest possible npt fittings at each junction;
e.g. regulator has 3/8" threaded ports, so that got 3/8" npt fittings with 3/8" threaded connections.
Hoses are have 1/4" threaded, so those got 3/8" npt fittings with 1/4" threaded connection.

So, I highly recommend swapping the the common 1/4" fittings for 3/8" fittings.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: