Best (or very good) Reciprocating Saw - battery operated ?

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Old 12-26-12, 10:20 AM
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Best (or very good) Reciprocating Saw - battery operated ?

I purchased a Rigid 12v articulating oribital saw - very disappointed with the fact that the batteries are not interchangable with our Rigid drill & charger ... and now the batteries & charger are "out of stock" online & at the store... So I am about to return it.. The reviews of the batteries also say that they suck - don't hold a charge and go bad after 6 months.

In your opinion(s), what is a better choice for a Reciprocating saw ? Is going cordless a bad idea in your experience.. I see various contractors using the Dewalt cordless brand ... is that overkill for a home owner? Probably more expensive?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:22 AM
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Corded is almost always a better choice unless you have a specific need for cordless.

Do you have such a need?
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:27 AM
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We're needing to cut a bunch of installed wood lattice in our yard ... Yea, we could probably run a 100 ft. extension cord if we needed, but the idea of a cordless is kind of appealing.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:32 AM
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A recip saw is generally a demo saw, not something used for finishing work.

Are you taking out the lattice and have to cut it to do so or are you installing it somewhere else?
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:37 AM
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Get one to match your current batteries? Do they not sell them? I assume you probably already thought of that.

I'd consider how much you will pay for a new cordless batteries and charger (and replacement batteries in the future)...vs a pretty good corded which will last forever for a typical homeowner. I have a Milwaukee that I payed about $99 for and it can keep going and going where my cordless just can't hack it.

Maybe you could borrow one?
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:40 AM
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Demo (of lattice) is what we are using it for ... and we run into these "demo" projects from time to time... so thought it would be nice to just have the tool on hand when needed.

as far as batteries -- that was what I specfically was trying to do - Match a Rigid saw with our drill set ... but alas, the batteries are not compatible and the new one requires it's own charger & battery pack ... thanks all.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:52 AM
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I had a cordless sawzall at one point. I just found for demolition work, which is what it's usually used for the batteries couldn't hold up. This left you constantly waiting for them to recharge before you continue.

I eventually got one of the lower end Dewalts. I think mine is a 10amp. Nothing huge, but it's never failed for anything I've had to use it for. Certainly going with something more powerful would likely add to it's longevity, but I've had mine for 10 years and it still runs just as good as the day I got it.

I think for the average homeowner, corded low amp would be the way to go.

I've beaten the hell out of this thing, cut through things I never thought it would make it through, etc.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 10:59 AM
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I have a 6 amp corded someone gave me several years ago and it has served me just fine.

Were I to buy a cordless, I'd get an 18 volt DeWalt so the batteries would match my cordless drill (and the impact driver I'm trying to justify buying...).
 
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Old 12-26-12, 12:28 PM
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I would buy a corded saw and not have the battery hassle for what appears to be a low usage tool.

I have a DeWalt corded saw that I've abused for 20 years. It still gets the job done. Unfortunately, it won't die so that I can justify buying a new Milwaukee corded sawzall.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 12:57 PM
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I like the blade attachment on Milwaukee saws, I would be looking at them if I bought another corded saw.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 01:23 PM
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For casual usage I never recommend battery-powered tools. I have a Milwaukee Sawzall (corded model) I bought at least fifteen years ago and it is still going strong. I seriously;y doubt that would be the case if I had bought a battery model. Remember also that a heavy-duty extension cord (#12 conductors minimum) has far more uses than just powering a saw in the back yard.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 03:08 PM
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I don't think that there would be much difference in performance running a sawzall off a 100' extension.

I have a cheapo B&D weed whacker. One of those orange plastic things. I used to use it just around the walkway but I found that I can operate it with up to 150' of extension cord without seriously affecting performance. I also have an Echo gas operated trimmer that now gets a lot less use.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 05:20 PM
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I have an 18V Dewalt, and its spent most of it's life on my bench at home. If I'm using a sawzall, its usually my corded one (PC Tiger - 9 amp). I seldom use the cordless, since it seems to only run down my batteries and doesn't have half the power of my corded one... but it only made sense to have one that matches my other batteries, for the few times that I would need it. I'd think you would come to the same conclusion, as some of the others have mentioned.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 06:42 PM
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Regardless of brand.....as stated, a battery operated sawzall definitely has it's limits.

But.....when choosing brands over the years I have been leaning more towards Ridgid.

I do have several Dewalt and Ridgid cordless tools.....to me Ridgid has a more solid quality feel.

But the real kicker is the Ridgid Lifetime Service Agreement.

Not only on the tool itself....but free replacement batteries for life!

I lost count of how many dead Dewalt batteries I have scattered around the shop....


.
 
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Old 12-26-12, 07:50 PM
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Like XSleeper, I use the PC Tiger saw. Much water under the bridge. The one thing I can agree with is battery operated tools are good if you use them enough to keep the batteries charged on a daily basis. When doing demo, the worst thing I can think of is being in a partially inaccessible place with a battery saw and the battery goes south. At least with the cord, unless someone trips over it, I can finish the job.
 
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Old 01-19-13, 08:28 AM
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Unless you positively have to have a battery operated one, don't go there. Never found one worth much.
 
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Old 01-19-13, 12:28 PM
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Thanks all ... returned the Rigid and bought a Corded Bosch ...
 
 

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