Sanders and Routers..


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Old 01-31-13, 12:29 AM
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Sanders and Routers..

Newbie to woodworking...

An oscillating tool like the Rockwell Sonicrafter has accessories for you to sand. When would you want to, or what would be the reason to buy a 1 function tool like an orbital sander? Is it for the bigger area coverage?

As for routers, is my understanding correct in that their purpose is to shape the edges of things like tables? A table corner that's round, smooth and beveled... Is that something that's accomplished by a router? Can you create the same rounded corners by sanding the heck out of it?
 
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Old 01-31-13, 06:56 AM
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Different types of sanders have different purposes. You wouldn't want to sand a large table top with a detail sander or an entire floor with a 1/4 sheet orbital sander.

Routers can do different things depending on the bit that is used and the application. A round over bit will give a consistent even rounded corner although it would still need a light sanding. The same could be accomplished with sandpaper but the longer the edge, the more difficult it is to keep it all even and/or straight.
 
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Old 01-31-13, 07:18 AM
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The way I like to approach such things is to look at what tools are needed for the project in front of me, it's always easier to justify the purchase when there's an immediate need.

What are you working on?
 
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Old 01-31-13, 07:25 AM
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The way I like to approach such things is to look at what tools are needed for the project in front of me, it's always easier to justify the purchase when there's an immediate need.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz2JYyNtTB3
This. When I got started doing this kind of thing, I went through a phase where I went crazy buying toys. Spent a lot of money on stuff I certainly eventually used, but it sat there for a very long time just getting old. I have a set of "corner clamps"(?) for making picture frames I guess? I bought them about 10 years ago. I have never used them once, but I spent around $40 on them at one point.
 
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Old 01-31-13, 03:06 PM
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LOL! Yes guys, I've caught the tool bug.

Okay, for something basic like shelves where some of the cut edges will be exposed. I'm assuming a sonicrafter is enough, right? I bought a sonicrafter for little sawing jobs and love that thing. It has these sanding pads that I can use. How do people smooth exposed edges out to look uniform with the rest? Just sanding? After that, how do people create that smooth polished feel? Go over everything with varnish?
 
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Old 01-31-13, 03:19 PM
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What's a sonicrafter?

Yep, I sand until smooth - progressing to finer and finer grits.

I prefer polyurethane finishes on the majority of my wood projects.
 
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Old 01-31-13, 03:23 PM
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To make the cut edge of a piece of shelving look like the finished edge I'll sand it until the grain is closed with a belt sander and finish up with a little hand sanding with 120-150 grit sandpaper. That will make the cut edge absorb stain/poly at the same rate as the rest of the wood.

To apply a finish on wood you'll generally give it a light sanding [always with the direction of the grain] then stain [or not] and apply either 1 coat of sanding sealer and 2 coats of varnish or 3 coats of poly, sanding lightly and removing the dust between coats.
 
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Old 01-31-13, 06:37 PM
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A multi-tool like a Sonicrafter will sand an edge, but will do it VERY slow. A palm sander, or a random orbit will sand and shape a surface much faster.

While you could just sand the edge with a sander, a router will give a more consistent profile. It will also do a more fancy edge above just a round over. This would also be faster then a sander.
 
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Old 02-04-13, 03:07 AM
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Need clarification on lingo.... Piece in question is 12" x 12" and is 3/4 thick. In my head, I've always considered the 3/4 side the "EDGE." That's not proper, right? The 3/4 is still considered a "SIDE" right? The edges are the thin sharp borders, right?
 
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Old 02-04-13, 05:11 AM
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You have a top , bottom , front and back edge, right and left edge. You won't have a "side" until you place a vertical piece to the piece you have, and if it is shelving, you won't. So you really don't have a "side".
 
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Old 02-04-13, 07:15 PM
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When describing a part, the edge would be the 3/4". When describing a part's dimensions, you would use the following format: thickness X width X length. If only two dimensions are given, they would represent width X length. The width is always across the grain and length is always with the grain.
 
 

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