Recommendations for a good vaccum dust collector to use with power saws?


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Old 03-23-13, 04:03 AM
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Recommendations for a good vaccum dust collector to use with power saws?

If I specifically search vacuums made by tool companies like Dewalt, Porter Cable, etc. The are like over $300. If I search shop vacs, I get $50 results. Am I missing something here? Why is there such a disparity? I'm not a professional, I won't have too much debris whenever I work. I'd like to stay at the cheap end, but I'm fairly new to the tool world so I would like to know something about the dust collection attachments that come with our circular saws, jig-saws, orbital sanders, etc. Are they universal? Are they made to fit run of the mill household shop vacs? Or, do you need to buy expensive vacuums made by the tool companies?

Would something like this work? Shop-Vac 9650600 3.0-Peak HP Pro Series Wet or Dry Vacuum, 6-Gallon - Amazon.com
 
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Old 03-23-13, 04:27 AM
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For small pick up the vac you suggest is just fine. It may last a couple of years before failure, maybe longer. The better lines have heftier motors and inner workings, thus the higher pricing.

Tool trash pick up is another ball game. The outlets on most tools is 4" and attaches to comparable sized hoses which are attached to a rather large vacuum system, similar to this: MikesTools.com: Delta Dust Collector 50-720 Delta 1 HP Dust Collector 650 CFM - Mike's Tools
 
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Old 03-23-13, 09:18 AM
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I think Larry is thinking more of stationary power tools. Most hand power tools like sanders, saws, and such use a 1 1/4" hook up, so you'd want one of the smaller vacs for that. What I don't like about the one you linked is that it only has a 6' power cord. If correct, that's awfully short. It will restrict your movement and likely require an extension cord.

I have a larger Ridgid wet/dry blower vac in the garage for bulk clean-up and car use, as well as to hook up to my Ryobi table saw. It has a 20ft cord and a 7' long 2 1/2" dia hose and onboard accessory storage. Runs about $60. RIDGID 12-Gal. Wet/Dry Vac with Detachable Blower-WD1280 at The Home Depot

For sanding dust pickup I have a small Ridgid power tool vac. I don't think they make them any more, but there may be similar models. It has about a 15' cord and a 10' long 1 1/4" flex hose. The best thing about it is that you plug the sander in to the vac, when you turn on the sander the vac starts up. Very cool. Esp cool since I picked it up for less than 1/2 price as a display model. I think I paid about $40.
 
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Old 03-24-13, 03:42 AM
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My other concern is that the shop vac and the power tool would be on at the same time creating a lot of noise. Does anybody do this? Take a hose and hefty black trash bag and wrap it tightly. Take the other end of the hose and connect it to the circular saw, jig-saw, or whatever. Is that silly? Would that work? I know there is no suction or vacuum, but at least some of the dust would get directed in the hose, and then we can just shake it down and direct it into the trash bag.

Would that work for little jobs? Anything hazardous with that idea that I'm not thinking of?
 
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Old 03-24-13, 05:19 AM
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Nothing hazardous with it, just a PITA to drag around a hose and bag of sawdust everywhere you go to cut wood.

I have my particulate vacuum come on when I turn on certain tools that are permanently hooked to it. I do use my larger Ridgid vacuum hooked to my planer, however, as it puts out shavings and not sawdust. Wifey uses shavings for the chickens, so on a smaller stationary tool, a regular vac and hose set up will work.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 06:25 AM
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So in doing further research, I'm realizing some Shop Vacs advertise "detachable blower," while others do not say detachable but still has blower function.

Is there a difference? Either way, something has to be attached to the vac-cum, right? LOL!
 
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Old 04-02-13, 06:42 AM
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Yes, a shop vac will make a lot of noise. You should be using hearing protection if you don't want to loose your hearing anytime you operate a tool.

Attaching a hose to your tool and a trash bag will do nothing for dust collection.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 07:08 AM
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I have a few Craftsman wet/dry vacs that I am happy with. I rarely bother to hook up a vac to a portable power tool, just wear a mask and try to work in front of an exhaust fan. Sawdust isn't much of a problem, it's heavy and mostly falls on the floor, fine sanding dust hangs in the air like smoke. A window mounted exhaust fan helps a lot. One thing to look for in a vac is a top mounted hose inlet. This lets you put a trash bag inside, weighted down, so you can avoid a face full of dust when emptying the bucket.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 08:26 AM
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No matter what type of tool you are using, there is very fine dust generated that will hang in the air for up to 3 hours after you stop cutting. The table saw in my shop is the worst dust offender. The dust collection for the other machines and tools works very well compared to my table saw. I can tell you the dust generated from the table saw coats the entire shop.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 07:26 PM
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What's stronger, shop vacs or those high priced Dyson stuff like the DC25? Or, is that comparing apples to oranges?
 
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Old 04-02-13, 08:05 PM
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Dyson? Now you aren't even making sense. Those vacuums are meant for cleaning floors. they are not going to work for what you are trying to do. I thought you didn't want spend a lot of money.

IF you want to spend money, get a Fein or a Festool. If you want some basic dust control on a budget, get a wet/dry vac like you have looking at.
 
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Old 04-02-13, 08:25 PM
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LOL! Hey, just asking. That's what happens when you're browsing and you have "related" products thrown at you, then you start to click to those products. Then you start to think about killing several birds with one stone.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 08:15 AM
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"Stronger"?
Comparing apples to oranges to grapes.
A floor vacuum has a motor that develops a lot of suction (static pressure) to pull up dirt & transfer it through hoses & channels to a small-capacity container.
A shop vac has a noisy AC/DC universal motor that spins at high RPM to develop high static pressure & medium velocity to suck up dirt and larger objects through a long hose to a large container.
A dust collector uses an induction motor spinning a large impeller-type fan to move huge amounts of air at high volume & low pressure to a large container.

In each category you often get what you pay for. Except maybe the Dyson which despite some clever engineering is still a bunch of cheap plastic & a noisy motor.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 08:40 AM
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To answer the detachable blower thing....

The motor and fan assy will detach from the canister and filter...normally just by pushing a latch. The exhaust is a part of the blower assy so you just hook your extension and nozzle to it and use it like a leaf blower. They normally have longer cords which is a plus to me. I have one like that, a Ridgid, and the blower works very well. I use it to blow leaves and such out of the garage and off the back patio.

The ones that say blower function....the assy doesn't detach and you have to wheel the canister around behind you.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 07:52 PM
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Thank you guys! Very informative.
 
 

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