Need advise on Saws & Saw Blades also Cordless Drill & Impact Driver

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Old 04-06-13, 07:47 PM
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Question Need advise on Saws & Saw Blades also Cordless Drill & Impact Driver

Hello there, this is my first posting on these forums. I decided to sign up and ask a question.

I recently purchased a Ryobi One+ 6 Tool Combo Kit. I also picked up a cordless Jig Saw & Random Orbit Sander. I know it might not be the very best that is out there but compared to what I had to work with before, it is an upgrade. Now I am finally able to do a lot of projects around the house. So I have been getting Sandpaper, Jig Saw Blades, Reciprocating Saw Blades and such so that I have what I need when the time comes for each project. I had a couple questions about Circular Saws & Blades and also about Reciprocating Saws and Blades.

First question, can you use Sawzall blades on Reciprocating Saws or do you need a Sawzall Saw?

Second question, the Cordless Circular Saw that came in the combo kit is a 5.5" Circular Saw with a 10mm Arbor. When looking at picking up some blades I saw a couple 5.5" Circular Saw Blades with 10mm Arbor and then I also saw a bunch of 5&3/8" Circular Saw Blades with 10mm Arbor. Can I use the 5&3/8" Blades on my 5.5" Circular Saw or will that be a problem? I would think it is OK but I do not want to find out that it is a bad idea while using the thing.

I also had one last question. Is it normal for a cordless drill and impact driver to not have 100% smooth shank spinning. Its almost like the bit when I put a bit in and run the drill or impact driver is at a very very tiny angle. It kind of wobbles very very slightly. It is not drastic but it is noticeable if you look for it. I am not sure if that is normal or not. Ryobi told me something like "The shank has a 0.015 inch variance" or something like that. That answer was not too helpful.

Anyways I hope you guys can help answer these questions for me. Thanks a bunch.
 
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Old 04-06-13, 08:35 PM
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Sawzall (reciprocating saw) blades are universal. They all have the same design, so they are not brand specific. I like using Milwaukee Axe / Torch sawzall blades in my Porter Cable Tiger saw. They are almost impossible to bend.

5 3/8" and 5 1/2" circular saw blades are fine to interchange, the main thing is the arbor size.

It's not surprising that the bit wobbles a little. If you drop your drill once, it will probably wobble even more. Or if you're lucky it will wobble less. LOL

A good test would be to buy a long 3/8" drill bit (12" long) and see if it wobbles noticeably when you have the drill stationary (such as by laying on the workbench, and holding it down while you turn it on). If it does, I'd leave the drill bit in, take it back to the store and show them, then demand an exchange. Or at least see if their sample drills on display do the same thing.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 01:17 AM
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I notice the "wobble" on a short bit.

I am probably going to take it to a service center because otherwise I have to exchange/return the whole kit and I have already started using the tools.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 01:44 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Doesn't make a difference that you used the other tools. Bring the kit back for exchange.
Most stores have a satisfaction guaranteed policy. I would not be satisfied bringing my brand new drill back for factory service.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 06:48 AM
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Yes, I assumed you were using a short bit... my point was that when using a short bit, you can probably stand a "little" wobble. But that wobble should be more pronounced with a long bit, and if it is... then it's not acceptable. It would also more clearly prove your point to a blockhead at the service/returns desk. If you complain about 1/16" of wobble on a short bit, they will probably just think you are a nitpicker because they don't understand the problem it creates in using the tool.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 07:46 AM
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One thing about using the 5 3/8" blade in the saw. It will be fine for 1x boards and plywood but not 2x lumber. The 5 1/2" will just barely cut through a 2x4 cleanly with the shoe all the way up (max depth). You will also have a slightly slower tooth speed on the smaller blade.

I have some of the same tools.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 08:14 AM
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Slightly slower is right, but... RPM's remain the same. The teeth make exactly the same number of revolutions, regardless of the blade size. I hate those 5 3/8" saws. A coworker had the 5 3/8 Dewalt, while I had the 6 1/2" Dewalt. I refused to use his. LOL
 
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Old 04-07-13, 05:28 PM
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So what I think you are saying is that yes the 5&3/8" blade will work but I need to use it carefully and slowly compared to using the normal 5&1/2" blades?
 
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Old 04-07-13, 05:34 PM
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Sure...it will work...not a huge deal...just my experience that you will not be able to easily cut 2X lumber.....not the job of a cordless anyway.

The tooth speed difference is very small....you'll never notice it on smaller boards.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 06:11 PM
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I don't think you have to change the way you cut, the 1/8" isn't that big of a deal... but I think what Vic is saying is that 1/8" might make it a little more difficult to cut through a 2x4 all the way, especially if you set the saw at an angle... you might miss that extra 1/16" of depth! LOL

Just thinking about cutting 2x4's on that saw makes me mad. LOL
 
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Old 04-07-13, 06:33 PM
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Lol X....yeah thats pretty much what I meant. Though they say it will crosscut a 2x...that's if it's perfectly flat to the wood.....even then it's iffy, leaves a thin skin that can cause tearout.

Angle/bevel cut...forget it....1X only. Believe me I know, from using my Ryobi stuff down at the wifes gym where I'm not hauling all my good (and heavier) tools.
 
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Old 04-07-13, 11:47 PM
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I completely understand about cutting 2x4's. I would have to use a 5.5" blade to cut a 2x4 at a straight cut.

I am not a construction worker for a job. I am mostly using these tools for jobs around the house. I believe even though I might have trouble using the 5-3/8" blades on 2x4's it should work for 90% of my needs around the house and anything that it wont cut I can just get Home Depot to do for $0.50 per cut.

All in all I am fairly happy with the tool set. If I was a construction worker as my main employment I might go with something else but for around the house work it suits my needs. Its a pretty good deal since I purchased it online and got a discount. $265 for 6 tools is a pretty good deal.

Thanks for all the advise/help guys I really appreciate it.
 
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Old 04-08-13, 04:08 AM
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If I was a construction worker
You would probably spend that much on a drill driver combination. You're fine with your purchase, once you get the drill thingy taken care of. The only thing I suggest, is USE them, so the batteries don't die a lonely death. For the most part corded tools are best for home use, due to the infrequency of that use, where batteries tend not to be charged when you need them to be.
 
 

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