Craftsman 10" Drill Press - Chuck Wobble

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Old 04-22-13, 06:20 AM
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Craftsman 10" Drill Press - Chuck Wobble

I just assembled my Craftsman 10" benchtop drill press that my wife go me for Christmas 2011. Everything went together well but the chuck wobbles ever so slightly. Is this typical or do I have a defective unit? Also, the instructions say to tap the chuck with a mallet to "firmly" attach the chuck to the spindle, but doesn't say how far. Do I keep tapping until it bottoms out on the spindle? If it isn't inserted all the way, would this cause it to wobble? I didn't want to keep tapping it because I didn't want to go too far. Also, the motor makes a clack-clack-clack sound when starting and stopping. When viewing the motor from the bottom side, I can see some sort of contraption with multiple springs on it that appears to be causing the noise. It lifts up when starting the drill and drops down when stopping it and is causing a noise. Doesn't look like this drill is manufactured any longer, which kind of worries me.
 
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Old 04-22-13, 08:47 AM
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It should not wobble.

I would suggest that you remove the chuck and make sure the tapered shaft and bore are clean then reinstall and give it a good tap to seat it.
You could use a piece of wood and a hammer to seat but don't overdo it.
A bit too late to return unfortunately.

The clack clack you are hearing would be the motor starting switch and although is not normally very loud, on some motors it is.

If this an inexpensive homeowner drill pres it likely isn't worth trying to buy parts to fix.
What model is it?
 
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Old 04-22-13, 09:49 AM
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The clack clack you are hearing would be the motor starting switch and although is not normally very loud, on some motors it is.
I know the sound you are referring to and I don't think that is it. I can see a piece at the bottom of the motor shaft with a couple springs on it that lifts up when starting and drops when stopping. It is apparently hitting something. "Clack-clack" probably was not the best choice of words. It's more of a slapping sound, like plastic fan blades slapping against metal--similar to the sound you would hear if you were to stick a playing card in the spokes of a bicycle wheel.

The chuck is on there pretty good and I cleaned and inspected the chuck and spindle before assembly. Supposedly I will need a balljoint puller to get it off. The drill has a laser assembly surrounding the chuck so whacking it with a hammer doesn't seem to be a viable option.

Model number is 21900 (10" bench drill press with Laser Trac).
 
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Old 04-22-13, 10:47 AM
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I suppose it's not really that bad. I cut some 5/16" holes in 1/8" zinc plated steel and they weren't very precise and have an oblong shape to them. Think I should probably drill a pilot hole first (1/8"?) and clamp the piece down real good. I was holding it with my hand. Is cutting oil necessary for such a thin piece?
 
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Old 04-22-13, 04:47 PM
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If you lower the chuck shaft look at the column to see if there is a slot cut into it.
Many drill presses have a slot immediately above where the tapered shaft ends to allow for removal.
It is made for a wedge shaped tool that you tap into the hole to drive the tapered shaft and chick out.
You may have even that wedged shaped tool in the parts that came with the press.

Cutting oil isn't really needed for something that thin but it would help your bits last longer if you do use it.
Even a small drop of machine oil would help.

If the sound is only when starting or stopping and not when running at speed then it will be the centrifugal mechanism that activates the starting switch.
Those things that move push on a round plastic disk while spinning to activate the switch to close and open the start windings.

A basic safety rule in using a drill press is to never hold anything with your hands that you are drilling.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 06:19 AM
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If you lower the chuck shaft look at the column to see if there is a slot cut into it. Many drill presses have a slot immediately above where the tapered shaft ends to allow for removal. It is made for a wedge shaped tool that you tap into the hole to drive the tapered shaft and chick out. You may have even that wedged shaped tool in the parts that came with the press.
I'll take a look. It really isn't that bad. I'm just a perfectionist.

Cutting oil isn't really needed for something that thin but it would help your bits last longer if you do use it. Even a small drop of machine oil would help.
Not concerned about the bits. I hardly ever use the press. I was curious if not using oil had anything to do with my oblong holes.

If the sound is only when starting or stopping and not when running at speed then it will be the centrifugal mechanism that activates the starting switch. Those things that move push on a round plastic disk while spinning to activate the switch to close and open the start windings.
That must be it. Thanks!

A basic safety rule in using a drill press is to never hold anything with your hands that you are drilling.
Roger that. Should have known better. Could have gotten ugly.

I tried another piece and this time used a 1/8" drill bit to drill pilot holes. One of the pilot holes was slightly off but still within tolerance so the bracket worked. Evidently drilling metal is considerably more difficult to master than drilling wood.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 08:50 AM
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oval holes

You can buy the nicest Powermatic drill press and you'll still get egg-shaped holes in sheet metal. It's not the press, it's the twist drill. They always skate and flex a little without enough material depth to guide them. The only way to fix this is to undersize the drill by 1/32 max and finish it with the desired size reamer.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 04:39 PM
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One thing I forgot to mention is that you should try to use the correct speed for the material and thickness you are drilling.
Setting the speed by changing the belt position on the drive pulleys should be done for each thing you drill.
Click image:

Image courtesy of woodmagazinedotcom

You can download and print the above chart.

Another thing that may help is the size of the pilot hole you drill for fasteners is important if you want the maximum holding power of a screw.
Chart for pilot hole size.

One last suggestion on out of round holes is that if you have inexpensive drill bits that may not be perfectly ground and could wander while drilling.
Kinda like when I try to sharpen a bit by eye.
 
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Old 04-25-13, 07:46 PM
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I used a pilot bit and was able to drill a more accurate hole. I already had adjusted the belt for metal drilling so that isn't the problem. It's encouraging to hear the it isn't the drill and that drilling metal is inherently more difficult and unforgiving. I was able to accomplish what I needed to do. Thanks for the input. FYI, I am using a Milwaukee drill bit and a set of Dewalt titanium bits (for metal and wood). Big-box store products. What is a more decent brand of bit?
 
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Old 04-26-13, 08:52 AM
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If you plan on doing a lot more metal drilling, invest in a set of US made cobalt bits. PTD, Cleveland, Chicago-Latrobe..

I love these: Welcome to Norseman Drill & Tool - America's Finest High-Speed Steel Cutting Tools

And start thinking about a sharpener
 
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Old 04-26-13, 10:40 AM
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One other tip for drilling metal. Get into the habit of using a center punch to spot the hole. The dimple keeps the bit from walking, especially with small bits.
 
 

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