Starter air tools...

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  #1  
Old 02-10-01, 08:39 PM
TLdot
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Question

I've accumulated most all the pneumatic car tools that I could need, so now I'm moving on to carpentry tools. I'll be doing some cabinet work pretty quick and was wondering what I should pick up first.

Help me out if you can...

I'm beginning construction on cabinets that will be covered with plastic laminate (Formica). What is the first air tool I should buy? Brad nailer, stapler, or finish nailer, or???

Can someone describe what each might be used for?

Thanks,
TL
 
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  #2  
Old 02-11-01, 02:56 PM
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Wink

I would probably start with either a 1/4" crown stapler or a 1" 18 ga. brad nailer for cabinet work.
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-01, 03:05 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,140
The name of the nailer pretty much tells what it is for. There are about 8 different size nailers all for different size or length nailers. Brad nailers are for brads, etc.
Each can be pretty spendy. I have a full set, and many I only use once in awhile. Good Luck
 
  #4  
Old 02-12-01, 11:42 AM
TLdot
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Thanks for the responses.

The carpentry and cabinet periodicals indicate frequent use of a crown stapler for assembling custom cabinets. I'm looking at an 18 gauge capable of 1/2" - 1 1/2" staples. Sound good?

Let me ask more specific questions...

1) What would you use a brad nailer for?
2) What would you use a finish nailer for?
3) What would you use a crown stapler for?

Thanks,
TL
 
  #5  
Old 02-13-01, 03:18 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,140
You would use a Brad nailer for nailing brads. Like putting up delicate trim work or even just regular trim, around windows, doors, or floors. The finish nailer uses 11/2 to 21/2 to 3" finish nails. Use when installing doors, windows, or anyplace you would use a finish nail. You would use a crown stapler for cabinets, or trim that won't hold up with brads, paneling, etc. I am kind of an anti trim guy, but it is because I had a guy do some work for me in my when I was busy and I think the only tool he had was a stapler. Everything was stapled and hard to finish. Grrrr
Good Luck.
 
  #6  
Old 02-13-01, 02:06 PM
TLdot
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Okay,

So I went to Lowes last night and picked up a new Stanley Boswitch 18 gauge 7/32" crown stapler. I promptly took it home to start shooting. I found it shot several double shots which was quite disappointing. I'll return it tonight.

I played a little hookie from my real job today and hit Sears. I picked up a combination Crafstman 16 gauge stapler/brad nailer. Any thoughts on this unit?

Since I'm in the tool forum, I also bought a Craftsman table saw, a biscuit joiner, and a 2 HP router. Too many toys to play with tonight!

Thanks,
TL
 
  #7  
Old 02-14-01, 03:22 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,140
I would have stuck with the Bostich. The reason it shot doubles was driver error. Bostich are so accurate and sensitive that if you hold the trigger 1/10 of a second too long you will get a double. Usually the only problems people have with Bostich is themselves. If you have ever visited the Bostich factory, you would not believe your eyes at the quality control each nailer and stapler goes through
 
  #8  
Old 02-16-01, 08:19 PM
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I have two 16 gauge finish nailers and use them for 99% of my finfish work. They shoot from 1" to 2 1/2" nails. Use then on casing and setting interior doors.

I use an 18 gauge brad nailer very seldom. But Don't normally do that small work.

We use the 1/4" crown stapler for aluminum soffit mostly.
 
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