Home drills


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Old 06-22-13, 01:26 PM
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Question Home drills

Which is the best drill for home use? I am female and don't want one that isn't too heavy. Which is best, electric or cordless? Believe a T-shape is easier to handle? Please let me hear from happy drill users. Thank you, Jeany
 
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Old 06-22-13, 01:29 PM
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Unless you have a specific need for cordless, corded is better.

Beyond that, what do you see yourself doing with it?

I would have to sit down and count all of my drills and I will pull out different ones to use for different tasks.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 01:34 PM
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Jeny, what mitch17 said. Unless you use a battery drill often, the batteries will be dead when you do have a use for it, guaranteed Likewise, I have corded for specific purposes, but my cordless Makita driver set is probably the most useful. I find the older Ridgids too heavy, although I have one of those, too.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 02:02 PM
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Jeany...for basic home use hanging racks on doors/walls, drilling holes for screws, driving screws, etc....a corded drill with some basic features is all you need.

Things I would really want on any drill...
Variable Speed
Easy access to reversing switch, preferably with the operating hand w/o releasing your grip.
Keyless chuck (just twist the collar to loosen and replace bits)
1/2" chuck (preferred...3/8" is normally fine, but not always)
Electric brake
Adjustable torque

It appears few drills in lower price ranges have 1/2" chucks...odd since almost all cordless drills do.

I'm not sure what you mean by a T shape.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 02:05 PM
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I think she means a T handle - often found on the bigger drills. IMO what drill to buy is best determined by what you intend to use it for. Cordless is great if you use and recharge the battery often, otherwise as the others have stated - a corded drill is better.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 02:19 PM
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Actually I'd say a 3/8" corded hammer drill. A bit heavy but hardly anything it can't do. My hammer 1/2" hammer drill was my go to drill for almost everything when I was working but a 3/8" would be more manageable for you. Consider for tight spaces a 1/4" inch cordless from someplace like Harbor Freight. Consider it a disposable drill. The price is cheap and when the battery dies just toss it and buy another.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 03:35 PM
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Thank you everyone for your advice ( : I would most likely use the drill to put up and take down hurricane shutters and small things like putting up a mailbox or drilling holes in the bottom of flower pots, etc. No doubt a cordless would be better after a hurricane and there's no electric BUT most wait until the electric goes back on to take off anyhow. The battery would most likely go on me before I got to use it--didn't I read something about a lithium battery that lasts like forever?!!!! I was wondering if anyone could give me a brand name that they think is superior after having used it. The t-shaped handle that I spoke of was said to be easier to handle--more balance, etc.
Gunguy45--- I was wondering if you had a brand name with the qualifications you mentioned? Thanks everyone! Jeany
 
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Old 06-22-13, 03:53 PM
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Jeany....I couldn't find any one brand that had all the features...but I was only looking at HD online...and the descriptions leave something to be desired. There are often more choices available in stores than what they show on their sites.

In the $55-65 range I see Sears has a hammer drill with all the features I mentioned I believe. Apparently any single sleeve chuck (only one hand required to tighten or loosen) has a brake of some sort?

Tools are very subjective...what I like may be too heavy or awkward for you. Best thing is just hit a few stores and handle everything in your price range.

Unless it was for a one time (or two time) job...I'd never buy a non-name brand tool.
 
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Old 06-22-13, 04:00 PM
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Thanks, you are right. What you like would most likely be too heavy for me so I'll do a one-on -one and see for myself which is the correct fit. Have a lovely evening. Jeany
 
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Old 06-22-13, 06:33 PM
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I can not remember the last time I've used a corded drill and unfortunately my tools tend toward the not cheap end. That said I use my tools regularly and I have recently adopted using a small cordless in addition to my full size. I have a couple Bosch that have performed well. They obviously don't have the power of their full size brothers but are extremely handy. For occasional home use I don't know if I'd go for a full size drill. The older drill is over a year old and my newer is 6 months and they both are going strong despite repeated dropping & kicking and being used out in the rain.



I have never used them but can't keep my hands off Dewalt model every time I'm in the store.



---
Lithium batteries will not last forever but they can be recharged hundreds of times and don't suffer from the memory affect of old NiCads. In fact they are rather tender. In use they run strong all the way up to the end and only have a few seconds of weak performance to warn that they are near dead. You must NEVER use a lithium battery until it's totally dead. If you do it will not charge. Also, lithiums slowly die of old age which you've probably noticed on your cell phone or laptop.

So, cordless tools are truly great. But after about 3 years the batteries are on borrowed time. A corded drill can be used almost forever. In fact I'm still using one from the 1950's I inherited from my grandfather. One big difference though is that almost all cordless drills have a adjustable clutch which is very handy when driving screws. Most corded drills are just that. Drills, so they demand more care when using them to drive screws.
 
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Old 06-23-13, 05:23 AM
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If you do decide to go with a cordless drill - think about future cordless tools you might want to buy. It's nice if all your cordless tools use the same battery! You don't need as many batteries that way and are more likely to have one charged up...... but for occasional use, corded tools are almost always a better choice.
 
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Old 06-23-13, 05:49 AM
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If you can't avoid the lure of a cordless drill, you may want to think of the new line of Ridgid. It is the HD brand. Batteries carry a lifetime warranty. How cool is that?? Wish Makita did. Just spent $100 on two for the collection. Two impacts, one drill, one charger and 5 batteries keep us going most of the day without down time.
 
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Old 06-23-13, 07:09 AM
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I can't tell you how pleased I am with all you "drill sergeants" out there! Never expected so much good advice. Think I am leaning towards the corded because of lack of use. I have a battery screw driver and it is seldom used. Now to find one that is female friendly ( : Thanks, Jeany
 
 

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