Any good sharpener for heavy chopper?

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Old 11-02-14, 08:47 AM
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Any good sharpener for heavy chopper?

hey guys, I am tired of spending so much time and effort trying to sharpen my meat chopper, mine is a heavy duty one and very hard to sharpen manually, I am seeking some sort of a sharpening tool which will not require any or much technical skill, maybe something like this?

Darex® WSKTS-K0 - Ken Onion Edition Knife Sharpener

I would prefer something cheaper than that, any ideas please?
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:05 AM
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What exactly do you mean by a meat chopper? A knife? Like a cleaver? If so, that one you linked should be fine. If it's a name brand like Shun or Wusthof...best to get one of the power sharpeners recommended by them.

Don't overdo it! using a steel occasionally to straighten the edge is much better than grinding metal off all the time. And use a maple block to cut on. Don't twist at the end, that really messes up the edge.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:17 AM
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I have this one by Chef's Choice:
http://www.amazon.com/Chefs-Choice-P.../dp/B000CSK0DM

They have cheaper models, too.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:31 AM
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Oh sorry for not giving a better description, mine is an 8" x 3" cleaver and very heavy
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:49 AM
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A lot depends on the steel. An older carbon steel blade is normally bit more flexible and "tough" than a newer stainless steel. A good cleaver is both tough and strong.

I still recommend not using a grinder type sharpener too often on a cleaver. They are normally for knives that slice...not chopping tools which have a greater angle on the blade.

You are in NY...I'd really suggest stopping by a local meat market and talking to a butcher for just a few minutes. People LOVE to talk about something they are good at.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 11:56 AM
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Well believe it or not, one chef had told me this is what he uses to sharpen his cleavers:

Klein Tools Knife and Scissors Sharpener-48036 at The Home Depot
 
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Old 11-02-14, 12:21 PM
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I have one very similar and use it on my pocket knives, scissors, and some kitchen knives. Not on my Shun knives since they use a different angle from most and some are single bevel blades.

I'd definitely use that on a cleaver w/o thinking twice. In fact, that would probably be ideal since it has a relatively strong angle. You don't want a razor edge on a cleaver.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 12:54 PM
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I use a similar manual sharpener similar to your last link from the chef. I don't however use it all the time, as a few pulls across steel is usually enough to get it sharp again. I have found that if you hand wash your knives they stay sharp almost indefinitely. Previously, when we would put them in the dishwasher, they would need sharpening almost every time. So now it is hand wash, light pull on the steel and when the steel doesn't work I use the hand sharpener. About every 2 years, my wife takes the knives down the to a local butcher and he sharpens them for free. Its part of my Birthday gift.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 01:37 PM
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Cool so I will get that kline sharpener, I just didn't expect something that cheap to do the job but from what I am being told Kline tools are quality tools?
 
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Old 11-02-14, 01:39 PM
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Czizzi...that's one reason I liked the Shun knives when I originally bought them. Free factory sharpening for life. Since they use a different angle, not all places knew how to do it correctly. Then they changed to having to mail them and pay a fee per knife...I just found out today free is BACK! Still gotta pay shipping of course, but cheaper than taking them all to a shop.

I bought a Shun online and when it arrived it was obviously some sort of display model with dings and chips. Seller refunded the money and said just keep it. Sent it to Shun (KAI) and they re-furbed it completely.

Anyway, like you, a few strokes with the steel occasionally is all they need for a year or 2 with proper use and care.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 01:43 PM
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Mike...it's the exact same tool I have with the Klein name on it. You could probably find it at WalMart (oops, you don't have those do you?) or any sporting goods store. Maybe cheaper. Yes, Klein is a quality name.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 02:07 PM
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Thanks, I will get it at Home Depot which is close by. I am also looking for a regular smooth edge knife set as the set I have is "Chicago Cutlery" which has serrated edges, I only need like 3 knives of different sizes so not a large set, any referals?
 
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Old 11-09-14, 09:46 AM
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That Klein sharpener was not what I expected, looks a lot bigger online but it's more like a toy and works fine on regular knives so will come in handy for that purpose but I still need something better for this heavy duty cleaver.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 10:11 AM
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Chicago Cutlery is pretty much...(uhhh, how do I put this nicely?)....junk. Not that they don't have a purpose...but they are very low end.

A quality 3 piece set will run a couple of hundred at least. I really like the Shun (as I mentioned), but Wustoff, J.A. Henkels, and Victorinox are very very good. There are others I've never used that also are highly recommended. The Shun just fit my hand better than the others and fits lefties or righties equally well.

Quality kitchen knives almost all come from Japan or Europe. There are some designed in the US, but almost all home cook brands are made overseas.

As to your cleaver...you shouldn't need a super sharp edge if it's more for heavy chopping. A coarse stone and a steel should do fine. When you get into the Japanese style of cleavers used for fine veg and meat chopping/slicing...yes, they have a sharper edge, but they aren't slammed down on a cutting board normally.

A little reading...Best Chef Knives - Six Recommendations | KitchenKnifeGuru
 
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Old 11-09-14, 11:15 AM
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Thanks for the referral, the Victorinox looks very affordable, all I need a smooth edge for is for cutting vegetables so I'll look into that and yes, the Chicago cutlery is junk, was a gift which is why we've used it these past few years.

Yeah I need a sharp edge for the cleaver since it is used for cutting meat and bones. I have stone and stell sharpeners but what I've noticed is takes both art and effort in using those and I am seeking something easier and faster.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 11:33 AM
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Bones? Sorry...that doesn't equate to sharp. Much different grind on the blade for that. Different tools for different tasks...that's just the way it works. Like a felling ax vs a hatchet.

I like serrated blades for certain things, mostly bread or slicing hams or bird breast, but for most other uses a regular blade works just as well.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 11:44 AM
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Sorry I am not understanding the difference between a meat cleaver and a hatchet?

Would you say this is good one?

Victorinox Chef's Knife 7 5" Stainless Steel Blade Fibrox 40523 Kitchen Cutlery | eBay
 
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Old 11-09-14, 01:38 PM
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Well, thats a chefs knife, designed for slicing...but like the old saying...you get what you pay for. I don't think I've paid less than $75 for any of my quality knives.

Remember, these are knives that if treated right could be passed down through 3 generations. I have some from my Mom that are easily 70 yrs old. Something Forge? Great knives for certain uses, but old carbon steel and require more care than my newer stuff.

I'm a stickler for certain things...and knives are the most basic tool ever. A cheap one may work fine with more care and attention...but even my little pocket knife that has been carried for at least 10 yrs cost $45 new. Some people are happy with a no name chinese knock offs....just not my style.

There's just no comparison between a $30 knife and a $100 knife. Just depends on what you value. Cleavers are different as I said earlier.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 02:31 PM
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My knives are J.A. Henkels, like I said, sharpen every so often, but use metal to hone before each use. Good enough to cut most everything including things like tomatoes and peppers (where duller knives have to poke first then slice). Only thing I use serrated blades for is bread. Fresh out of the box, on my birthday, first use, I sliced my finger whilst hand cleaning my Henkel in the sink. Forbid the kids from using as they were so sharp. They are not as sharp as factory now (see previous bone head move of throwing them in dishwasher) but hold a nice edge and I really like them.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 03:09 PM
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Well of course, quality things cost quality money, if I could afford the best in everything I need I would but that's not my situation unfortunately so I am trying to get something mid-quality which I can afford.

Even if I were to buy a hatchet I would still need a sharpening system so best I find something which can effectively sharpen my cleaver. One of the main problems with my cleaver as I am being told is the 'thickness" of it. I was told by a a few construction guys that mine needs a machine to grind down.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 04:09 PM
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Being in the area you are...you may not be familiar with certain things. (No offense, I've only been through Queens once I think) For instance...a lawn mower blade is never sharpened to a razor edge. It will dull quickly and just chop the grass. A hatchet has a thick head with a lot of weight for splitting kindling and making pegs. It would normally never be sharpened more than a coarse stone could do. A double bit ax is much thinner and has a sharper edge for precision cuts and taking out wedges from trees.

A fine chefs knife is normally very thin and has a narrow angle on the blade..sometimes only on one side (esp in the case of many Japanese grinds).

All depends on usage...there is just no "one knife (or 2 or 3) does it all".

The "construction guys" are full of it. A coarse stone will put plenty of an edge on it. Problem is the steel. Soft is easy to sharpen, but doesn't hold an edge as it bends with each usage. Harder steel is more difficult to sharpen, but will normally hold the edge longer if not abused.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 06:04 PM
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I've been using this to sharpen blades: http://m.harborfreight.com/1-in-x-30...der-61728.html

Puts a nice edge on knives etc. is fairly cheap, but there's a bit of a learning curve. Lots of vids online, to show you how to properly sharpen with one, however.
 

Last edited by Lwnboy; 11-23-14 at 06:05 PM. Reason: Corrected link
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Old 11-24-14, 04:40 AM
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I may just get this especially since there are vids which can help, thanks!
 
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Old 11-24-14, 08:47 AM
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I just read this thread. As a FYI the 8" version of the Victorinox knife linked earlier has been a "best buy" recommendation of Cook's Country/America's Test Kitchen for years.
8" Victorinox Chef's Knife

While they prefer expensive professional cutlery, they found that particular knife sharpens well, holds an edge, and has great "feel" in the hand.
 
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Old 11-24-14, 03:49 PM
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Great, appreciate that, thanks!
 
 

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