cutting 55 gal steel drum to make bbq

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Old 05-11-15, 05:19 AM
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cutting 55 gal steel drum to make bbq

I have 2 steel drums, one had coconut oil in it, the other oregano oil.
Firstly, will this blade work on a circular saw to cut them in half? http://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B0030XM...W9L&ref=plSrch
Secondly, do I need to wash them out? I don't think these oils are explosive.
Lastly, would a cutting blade on a grinder be better? I'd feel safer using a circular saw I think.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 05:27 AM
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I'd think a grinder would be quicker/easier. IMO if using a skil saw a fiber blade would be better. Something like this - http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...llow&cId=PDIO1
I wouldn't think the oil residue would be an issue.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 05:39 AM
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Yes, that blade should work and cut pretty quickly. You could also use a diamond or abrasive carborundum blade but they leave a pretty good sized burr and generate a impressive shower of sparks.

Over the years I've set so many things on fire that "probably" wouldn't burn that I no longer risk it. Whichever blade you choose I would wash the barrels out before cutting as the cutting will generate a lot of hot metal sparks that could ignite the oil.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 06:00 AM
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I think I would choose the metal cutting blade over the fiber blade. I have had fiber blades disappear when cutting sheet metal because the metal edge turns them to dust.

Be sure to double up on your hearing protection. (muffs and plugs) They don't call them screamer blades for nothing.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 06:15 AM
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Cutting Steel Drum

Eye protection is also a must.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 07:56 AM
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Make sure the bungs are removed before cutting.
Sure you do not have one but any real welding shop would use a plasma cutter.
It's fast, easy to get a straight line and almost no burr.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 01:35 PM
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I read that you should only use a worm drive with metal blades as circular saws for wood won't stop metal parts being into it - that true?
 
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Old 05-11-15, 01:49 PM
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I've used my straight drive Milwaukee circular saw to cut steel a lot and it's still alive and kicking. But, it's my beater saw so I also use it for dry cutting stone, tile and bricks with the resulting thick clouds of dust. So, when if it ever dies I probably will not know the true cause other than operator abuse.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 01:56 PM
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Can I just secure the drum and cut from one end or is it best to plunge cut in the middle first?
 
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Old 05-11-15, 02:06 PM
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Just looked at the price of that blade. I'd probably try a steel plywood blade* backwards on the circular saw. Have a helper spritch a little WD40 as you cut. I'd cut from one end.

*I used plywood blades that had become to dull to use to cut plywood. Never cut a barrel but have cut a stack of several sheets of corrugated steel roofing this way.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-11-15 at 08:33 PM.
  #11  
Old 05-11-15, 07:50 PM
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Grinder blade is probably cheaper but a bit worried about grinder kickback. I spsre if the blade is spinning upwards, the kickback would be into the drum and not back at me.
Seems easier to stand to the side of a circular saw than to the side of a grinder.
 
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Old 05-11-15, 08:11 PM
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We use recip saws to cut oil tanks in half.Even the cheap ones from Harbor Freight.Can go thru a couple of blades though and not easy.
 
 

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