Nail gun degree question

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Old 07-15-15, 12:45 PM
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Nail gun degree question

I see they sell angled magazine loaded guns and believe I understand straight vs angled but what I do not understand is I see they sell various angled guns for instance a 34 a 21 and a 15 just as reference point to my question. Do these guns all shoot at the angled mentioned or is it the magazine they are referring to. I firstly need to know why someone would want a gun that shoots at an angle vs a gun that shoots true and straight into the material. I believe I would want a gun that shoots true and straight down and I know exactly where it is going without having to ponder how far out at the angle it will pop out. Hopefully you guys understand my question. I am old fashioned and like a real hammer and nails that you hammer straight into the material I want a gun that does the same and not shoot at any degree into the material beside a zero degree.
 
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Old 07-15-15, 12:56 PM
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They all shoot straight down. The angle refers to the the magazine or feeder that holds the nails. The angle is primarily due to the heads on the nails. In order to get the nails side by side one nails head must be above the one in front of it. That stair stepping creates an angle. Most trim nail guns do not have an angle as their nails don't have the pronounced round heads on top.
 
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Old 07-15-15, 01:01 PM
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16 ga guns are straight and 15 ga are angled but, AFAIK, they're all the same angle. The issue is with framing guns, as there are many different angles but some are much easier to find nails for than others. Hence, when buying a framing gun, one should look at the availability of nails when deciding which is the right gun.
 
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Old 07-15-15, 01:06 PM
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While it's still possible to shoot a nail at an angle with a nail gun, the nail follows a straight path [barring knots or other obstructions] from the head of the nail gun. The angle of the nail magazine allows you to get closer or better access the area you need to shoot the nail.

When shopping for a nail gun you may want to investigate both the price of the nails and their availability. A 27 nail gun will only shoot the 27 nails, the nails have to be matched to the gun. You can swap brands but not the size of the angle.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 07-15-15, 03:41 PM
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All my framers are different. Bostitch is 28 degree, Senco is 21 degree, I believe, and the Strapshot is another angle. I think it is proprietary, too, just to get you to buy their nails. I see little advantage of one angle over the other.
 
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Old 07-15-15, 04:56 PM
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Generally the steeper the angle the shorter and less awkward the gun is. When you have a 30 degree gun, like a Paslode, the distance from the front of the gun to the back of the magazine will be shorter than a 21 degree gun. Since the 21 degree gun has a flatter magazine, the distance from the front of the gun to the back of the magazine is LONGER, making it a bit more difficult to swing it in and out of studs. But generally, it's all what you get used to. I think longer magazines hold more nails so you are stopping less often to reload.

1+ for the comment about checking to see what nails are available in your area. In some areas they don't allow clipped head nails so full head nails need to be used in the gun. Keep that in mind too.
 
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Old 07-16-15, 07:30 AM
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Another vote for checking the stores YOU shop in before buying a nailer. Last weekend I got a killer deal on a sealed Bostich 15Ga finish nailer ($47, down from $198) but after looking into it I found it's very hard to find the 25 nails it takes. I don't want to hobble myself with proprietary nails so it's going back.

The situation is ludicrous with all the nail gauge, angle, head and binder choices (will that be paper, plastic or wire, sir?). The shelves and even the nail packages are poorly marked.
 
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Old 07-16-15, 10:49 AM
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Menards has those Bostich nails, if you have one in your area.
 
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Old 07-16-15, 03:17 PM
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Nail gun degree question

Thanks for the words but still I am confused as to why they sell 23, 18 & 16 gauge nails by gauge size and length, why do they not sell all the nails like that. How come you have to buy 21 or 30 degree angled nails and not just by the gauge size if all the degree does is tell you the angle of the magazine. Should they not just sell them by say 8, 10 & 12 gauges and not by the degree? Why are the little ones sold straight and by gauge size and not the larger ones?
 
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Old 07-16-15, 03:56 PM
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I don't know what you don't get? The nails are collated together at an angle to match the angle of the magazine of the gun that they fit in. We already established that there are lots of different angles of guns made.

Compare this...
[ATTACH=CONFIG]53429[/ATTACH]

With this...
[ATTACH=CONFIG]53431[/ATTACH]

See the difference? So 21 degree framing nails won't fit a 30 degree framing gun.

Finish nails are small so they are sized by "gauge" and their length in inches. Larger nails have both a "penny" size, like 16d... which denotes the length AND then they also have a diameter in inches, like .148 or .113.

As for 23, 18, 16 ga. finish nails, they are generally all collated in a straight line, because their magazine is straight.

There are also finish nails that are at an angle, and they are usually brand specific, as guy mentioned in post #7. 15 ga. nails are almost always angled finish nails. (collated at an angle)
 
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Last edited by stickshift; 07-20-15 at 09:17 AM. Reason: Correction per X in later post
  #11  
Old 07-17-15, 07:22 AM
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Nails

Clipped head nails fit closer together in the collation and form a steeper angle than round heads which have to be spaced farther apart.

As has been mentioned, be aware that some jurisdictions do nor allow clipped head nails due to the reduced holding strength.
 
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Old 07-18-15, 05:48 AM
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Ken, I disagree with the reduced holding strength. Mostly Florida requires round head nails. I have never had a nail failure from using Bostitch clipped head nails. I think it is similar to the industry driven AFCI rules in the NEC. Good ideas, but going overboard with regulations requiring them is a bit much.
 
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Old 07-18-15, 06:23 AM
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As for 23, 18, 16 degree finish nails
The word "degree" in my post above should have been "gauge".
 
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Old 07-18-15, 06:57 AM
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Nails

Ken, I disagree with the reduced holding strength
Larry, I yield to your experience. I guess the perceived stronger round head is due to its larger head surface area. Regardless, the regulations and inspectors' wants must be fulfilled.
 
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Old 07-18-15, 12:19 PM
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I don't know if clipped head nails have less holding power but I do know that clipped head nails are not allowed in my area. That's why I bought a full head Porter-Cable framing nailer, rebuilt for about half the price of a new one.

I would strongly suggest that anyone considering purchasing a framing nailer check their local building codes to see if clipped head nails are allowed.
 
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Old 07-20-15, 09:20 AM
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It makes sense that a smaller head would have less holding power but, as has been mentioned, it doesn't really matter as you have to keep the local AHJ happy regardless. Like Furd, I bought a full head PC framing nailer so I never had to worry about it.
 
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