Wiring AC electric drill without switch

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Old 10-18-15, 11:35 PM
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Wiring AC electric drill without switch

I have an Ac electric drill with a universal motor. I have removed the switch from the drill and want to wire the drill to run at its fastest speed clockwise. There are a total of eight wires that to address. There are two wires coming from the Ac plug. There is a green wire attached to the brush on the north side of the motor and a green wire attached to the brush on the south side of the motor. On the north side of the motor there are a brown wire and blue wire west and east respectively of the brush and attached to the armature. On the south side of the motor, there are a blue wire and brown wire west and east respectively of the brush and attached to the armature.

How do I attach the wires to accomplish my goal?
Thanks for your help.

Mbjg0788
 
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Old 10-18-15, 11:44 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Were all 8 wires connected to the switch .... and you just cut them off ?
Any possibilities of a model number for the drill ?

A picture or two would be helpful. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 10-18-15, 11:44 PM
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What is it your really trying to do?
As simple cable tie would have worked to just get it to run full speed.
 
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Old 10-19-15, 11:20 AM
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Having quite literally "taken a ride" a 1" drill once, I suggest you rethink this. Very low speed and a short cord saved my carcass.

Yes, I was young, dumb and too eager to please, but very lucky, escaping with only a few bruises and a valuable safety lesson about locking the trigger on any power tool.
 
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Old 10-19-15, 12:21 PM
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The drill is probably land fill but tell us what the ultimate purpose will be and we will try to help you do it in a safe and proper way with the right kind of motor.
 
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Old 10-19-15, 10:34 PM
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Electric Drill wiring

Thanks to all for your responses. I will try to answer all of your questions. I intend to put a bit with a wire brush in the chuck and then fasten the drill to my work bench and use it as a "wire wheel". I have a brand new bench grinder with two sharpenening stones one on each of the two ends that I do not want to dismantle and replace one stone with awire wheel. All of the wires were attached to the switch. The drill is a cheap Harbor Freight drill, nothing complicated. As I previously stated, the drill is run on Ac current. So if someone tells me where the two wires from the plug get attached that would be helpful. The drill has a brushed motor. So do I attach the hot wire to one brush and the groung wire to the other brush? If so where are the wires attached to the field windings attached? I will try to take clear descriptive photos tomorrow and attach them. Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 12:34 AM
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I did up a diagram. I don't know which winding is which. Try connecting the winding closest to it's respective brush. If it doesn't spin the correct direction then one of the windings will need to have the brown and blue reversed. Good luck.

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Old 10-20-15, 07:16 AM
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Electric Drill wiring

Pete,
Thanks so much for the diagram. Please excuse my ignorance but what does the humpy line between the blue and brownv wires mean? From my research, I believe it represents an inductor. What is an inductor, where would I get two of them and why do I need them especially considering they we not part of the original design of the drill? Thank you for your patience with my novice questions.
John
 
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Old 10-20-15, 09:29 AM
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The "humpy lines" are the standard schematic symbol for a coil.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 10:17 AM
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Electric Drill Photos

Attached are the photos of the drill that I have referenced in this posting.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 10:21 AM
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Ray,
would that be a simple coil of wire that I can loop as in the drawing or something more complex like a coil for a vehicle? In other words, is it something I can put together or something I would need to purchase?
Thanks,
John
 
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Old 10-20-15, 10:30 AM
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I purposely used the SAME colors in my drawing as your two windings.
I even described windings in the text.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 11:29 AM
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The coil is the wingdings not something you make.
 
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Old 10-20-15, 04:06 PM
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Thank you Peter. Worked like a charm. I appreciate your taking the time.

John
 
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Old 10-20-15, 05:42 PM
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Your welcome.

Be on the alert for Ray's wingdings too. (post 13)
 
 

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