How do I install this window A/C?

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  #41  
Old 06-27-16, 10:22 PM
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If the board is well secured it shouldn't go anywhere or go thru both and make it more secure. Screws come in a lot of sizes ,just have to visit a hardware store.
 
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  #42  
Old 07-10-16, 04:30 PM
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Why is this pilot hole taking several minutes to drill...?

Took me a minute to drill the hole in this photo and it isn't even through the board yet. Practicing with a new drill and the following tools and it's taking forever to put a pilot hole into a 1-inch wood board. Doesn't seem right. Eventually, I need to drill wood into stucco, which I thought was thicker than the wood. Am I doing this correctly?

TOOLS I'm using:
Ryobi drill, Model# D620H (6.2 amp motor)
wood board
Tappon carbide tip concrete drill bit (5/32 x 4 1/2) -concrete, block and brick
Tapcon concrete anchors (screws; 3/16 x 2 3/4) -concrete, block and brick

Also, the screws (called "anchors") look like they're the same width as the Tappon drill bit, except for the threading. Are these the right size screws? The package calls them "anchors."

thank you
 
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  #43  
Old 07-10-16, 04:39 PM
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Rookie trying to drill a pilot hole... ?

I'm wondering why it's taking so long to drill a pilot hole into wood. I'm using a Ryboi D620H drill, 1" thick wood board, Tapcon carbide concrete drill bit 5/32 x 4-1/2. Also want to know if I've got the right screw (called anchors on package); they're 3/16 - 2-3/4".

I thought it was supposed to drill fast. It's taking forever. Photo below. What am I doing wrong?

thanks
 
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  #44  
Old 07-10-16, 04:40 PM
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The tapcon drill bit is not an ideal bit to drill wood, first of all.... its a masonry bit. Use a regular wood/steel drill bit to drill a pilot hole through the wood first. Tapcon screws are for screwing items into concrete. Is that a hammer drill? if not, it won't drill into the concrete very well either.
 
  #45  
Old 07-10-16, 04:50 PM
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Make sure the drill is turning in the clockwise direction (as looking from behind the drill). Many drills are bi-directional.
 
  #46  
Old 07-10-16, 05:29 PM
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Red face

That makes sense. The Home Depot staff gave me bad instructions and told me to buy the wrong stuff, I guess. It is a hammer drill. I have a few questions, if you don't mind.

I need to drill an already cut piece of wood onto a stucco, outside window sill so that I can place a window a/c on top of the board (it has to be raised because the sill drops too far down). After I drill the wood into the stucco, I need to drill an A/C support that I purchased at Home Depot onto the wood board that's drilled into the stucco -so that the a/c can actually sit on it so it will take the weight off the sill.

1. Is it better to drill pilot holes into the wood and stucco or do I just drill?
2. If it IS better to drill pilot holes first, can I use the same bit to drill pilot holes into wood and stucco OR do I need two different bits?
3. I don't understand using two separate drill bits to make two separate pilot holes (one for wood and one for stucco) because the same screw needs to go into both. It's one hole. It will be hard to know where to drill the screw on top of the stucco since the wood board goes on top.


THANK YOU VERY MUCH

ps: Photo below of the other bits I have --do these go into wood?
 
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  #47  
Old 07-10-16, 06:25 PM
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Hold your board up and put 2 marks on it where you intend to drill. Take it down. Use your Ryobi drill bit (5/32) to drill through the wood only. Then switch to the tapcon drill bit in your hammer drill. Be sure you have the drill set to hammer... you should hear it vibrating when you drill. Hold the board back up where you intend to screw it. Put a level on top. Drill one hole. Put in one screw. Check for level again, the drill your second hole and put in your second screw.

Read the writing on your Ryobi case. Wood, metal, plastic... not for concrete. The carbide masonry bit is for concrete, (hammer drill only).
 
  #48  
Old 07-10-16, 06:52 PM
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Bob,
That's it! It's drilling fast now -into wood and stucco. THANK YOU!

Drilling a slab of wood into a stucco windowsill with a Ryboi corded drill (it has a hammer drill in it as well). Using Tapcon carbide tipped concrete drill bit, size 5/32" x 4-1/2" (for use with 3/16", it says). So, I'm using Tapcon concrete anchors, size 3/16" x 2-3/4". Don't know why they're called "anchors" cuz they look like screws, not anchors -but I don't know anything about this, obviously.

Question: The screws (called "anchors" on the box) are 3/16 and the drill bit is 5/32. Are these the right screws for this drill bit? I was told they were but they look the same width.
 
  #49  
Old 07-10-16, 07:07 PM
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If it is the Tapcon bit recommended for your Tapcon screw it is correct. Anchors are normally a plug that is inserted into a hole and a regular screw is inserted into so anchor confuses me a bit also. Can't tell for sure from the picture but if these are just blue screws that go straight into the block they are what you need.
 
  #50  
Old 07-10-16, 07:12 PM
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I have merged your two threads because they are related.
 
  #51  
Old 07-10-16, 09:48 PM
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Your help is much appreciated )

Ok, I drilled the Tapcon screws into the wood and stucco -it's stuck on. I don't think I used the hammer drill part of the drill though. I just drilled it. Not sure if it was right to use the Tapcon screws into the wood but that's what I was told to do by the guy at Home Depot. He said the Tapcon screws would go into wood and stucco. Hmm... not sure it's the best screw for wood. The wood has tiny little cracks where they were drilled. Technically, you might say it split but it's so small -maybe 3 centimeters- and the entire board seems good but I don't know if that's ok over time. I drilled three holes and all three have tiny little cracks in the wood right there. I hand screwed the Tapcon screws in and tried yanking the board out after screwing half way, feeling like I could pull them out if I was a muscular man so I didn't pull with all my weight but I pulled pretty hard and they did not come out.

Is this ok or should I pull them out and start over?
I cannot yank that board out now, no way. It's screwed in with three Tapcon screws.

But now I have to drill the plastic "concaves" that come with the A/C safety board to hold the a/c and I do want to ask you...

The wood screws I have to drill the first hole are too long by about 1/4 inch and they have to go all the way through. Will wood screws go through stucco? If not, can I use the same Tapcon screws to go through wood and stucco again or will that hurt the board? This is to drill the plastic "concaves" (the things that the a/c safety board rests on and bring the a/c to the exact height needed on top of the board.)

THANK YOU
 
  #52  
Old 07-10-16, 10:27 PM
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I haven't really been following but if you are going to screw a board to say a wall I always drill a hole slightly large in the top board. The main reason is the screw threads don't catch in the top board and push it away the second reason is it eliminates the chance of splitting the board if you are close to the end.

Honestly I never use wood screws. I use either deck screws or sheet metal screws. How ever Tapcons should work. Just be sure to drill a hole slightly larger then the screw in the top piece and a pilot hole in the bottom. If you use deck screws you usually don't need the pilot hole, just the slightly oversize hole in the top piece. I usually use a 3/16" drill bit for the top piece.

Honestly you seem to have made this job a lot more complicated then any I have done. Not sure why or exactly how to advise you. Not even quiet sure what you are doing. Can't think of any reason to be screwing anything to the outside of the house but as I said I haven't read all the posts. Maybe some pictures of the mounting?
 
  #53  
Old 07-11-16, 12:29 AM
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XSleeper,
I just now saw your post about a different bit for wood. I drilled three holes into wood with the Tapcon bit. Tiny little cracks in the wood by the screws. Should I pull them out and start over? (There's not much empty space on the sill that is free of drilled holes).
 
  #54  
Old 07-11-16, 12:39 AM
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ps: Just realized... It's not the Tapcon bit that caused tiny cracks in the wood; it's the Tapcon screws (called anchors). Not sure why. I tightened them and the wood cracked a tiny bit.

If someone could answer the questions in red from 8:48pm, I'd appreciate it. That'll close my whole deal.

thanks
 
  #55  
Old 07-11-16, 01:47 AM
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Is this ok or should I pull them out and start over?
If you mean a board under the A/C I'd leave it.
Will wood screws go through stucco? If not, can I use the same Tapcon screws to go through wood and stucco again or will that hurt the board?
Not sure what you are doing but if you are fastening to wood behind the stucco just drill a hole slightly larger then the screw with a masonry bit. Then drill a pilot hole in the wood under the stucco. If the board is on top drill a hole slightly larger than the screw into it.
 
  #56  
Old 07-11-16, 08:50 AM
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Ray,
I have no idea what you're saying -drilling a hole larger than the area the screw will go into makes no sense to me since it will fall out. Obviously, I'm misunderstanding you but I don't think it matters.

If you look at the photo, you'll see that it's wood painted white (I put primer and exterior paint on it) and there are three Tapcon screws that drilled that wood into the outside stucco sill (photo only shows two). So the wood board is fixed onto the stucco and you can see where the wood cracks a tiny bit around the screws.

I still need to drill more holes into that wood because there are two a/c supports that are going to hold the air conditioner and take the weight off the sill. That a/c support has to sit on the plastic "concaves" they came with so I have to drill the plastic concaves onto the wood board and I need to drill six more screws. But... the wood screws I have are too long. They have to be flush with the board, so I'm wondering:

1. Will wood screws go into stucco?

2. I'm thinking that wood screws will not go into stucco so... if they don't go into stucco, instead of going to the hardware store and getting shorter wood screws (it's far from my house), is it ok to drill more Tapcon screws into the same wood board in the photo below? The Tapcon screws are long but they will go into the stucco; I'm just concerned that they will ruin the board by causing more tiny splits.
 
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  #57  
Old 07-11-16, 11:23 AM
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#1 Try it.You will have to really lean on the screw(drill) once it hits stucco. #2 Yes it's ok. Predrill with a bit 1/16" plus ( plus is a couple hairs) smaller then the tapcon screw in the wood. Paint and putty does wonders for screw ups.
 
  #58  
Old 07-11-16, 12:33 PM
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I have no idea what you're saying -drilling a hole larger than the area the screw will go into makes no sense to me since it will fall out. Obviously, I'm misunderstanding you but I don't think it matters.
It does matter. It makes putting the screw in a lot easier because you don't have to fight to hold the top board down. Instead the screw pulls the top board down and the top board won't split.

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  #59  
Old 07-11-16, 08:10 PM
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thanks, everybody

What is the right drill bit to make a pilot hole for a wood screw, #12 x 1 -1/2"?

3/32
7/64
1/8
9/64
5/32
11/64
...or something else?
 
  #60  
Old 07-11-16, 10:49 PM
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From my favorite fastener supplier. (Sent them an order this morning.)

https://www.boltdepot.com/fastener-i...Hole-Size.aspx
 
  #61  
Old 07-13-16, 12:36 PM
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Thanks -it makes sense to have different bit sizes for soft wood.

I just made a mistake drilling an extra six holes into this little board and I hope I didn't ruin it. I basically placed the wrong screws in and didn't realize it until after they were drilled. I pulled them out and had only one screw that I thought would work perfectly: a thick, long, flat-headed Tapcon screw. It works beautifully. But I had to re-drill another six holes into that little piece of wood (2 x 24) in areas that seem far enough away from the other holes because I didn't drill in the right spot before. I thought I had this all down and when I actually did it, I made mistakes but learned a lot.

Also think I have the "fear of operating a drill on a project involving a heavy item on the top floor of an apartment complex." That's got to be listed as a fear somewhere.

Hopefully, I didn't kill my wood board by drilling it too much. Will send a photo when completed. Thanks again for all the kindness.
 
  #62  
Old 07-14-16, 12:45 AM
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Just use some wood filler, Plastic Wood is one brand, in the holes. Sand it smooth and paint.
 
  #63  
Old 07-14-16, 02:19 PM
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hi Furd, thanks.

Home Depot doesn't have the same size Tapcon screw that I need so I got stucco screws (made for stucco). Already drilled the pilot holes going through the wood and through the stucco.

Is it better to use a wood screw and only go through the wood OR is it better to use the stucco screw and go through the wood and stucco? I know the stucco screws aren't meant for wood but if it doesn't damage the wood, I prefer it, so I guess I'm asking if a stucco screw would damage wood. I think it's pine, soft wood. The screw is wider than the pilot hole so it should grip well.

This is the last thing I have to drill -except for the holes in the wood for the accordion panels but I think that should be easy.
 
  #64  
Old 07-14-16, 03:34 PM
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You need to shop at a hardware store. BigBox stores are not full service hardware stores.
Is it better to use a wood screw and only go through the wood OR is it better to use the stucco screw and go through the wood and stucco?
The screw needs to be for the material it will be threaded into. If it will thread into stucco than it needs to be for stucco and the top board needs a hole slightly larger than the screw.

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If the brown in the picture is stucco not a board then use a stucco screw.

If you could step back and give me a picture of the window with the A/C so I can get an idea why you need to do any of this. Right now I am trying to answer your questions but I do not know overall what you are trying do or why.
 

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  #65  
Old 07-15-16, 01:21 PM
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Thanks, Ray ;-)

This is a white-painted wood board (soft pine) that I embarrassingly drilled (more than once) onto stucco (mauve-color) with Tapcon screws. You can see that I'm not on the first floor (part of the reason for my fear, don't want anything to fall). The plastic pieces you are seeing are also drilled on with Tapcon screws. So... Tapcon screws are going into the wood and then straight into the stucco. I had to use Tapcon screws because I needed something that would go into the stucco -otherwise, why drill? (Normally, the stucco would be raised higher so a wood board isn't needed). I am still working on installing the window a/c.

I need to drill two more plastic pieces on each side (that fit on top of the ones you now see). Those two pieces are necessary because they purposely fit over the ones there now and they are going to hold the a/c support, which will hold the a/c, which will sit on that window frame.

I have already pre-drilled all the holes and only need to know what kind of screw to put in there now to hold the remaining plastic pieces. I've already got Tapcon screws in there.

Do I use a wood screw, which will go through the wood fine but won't go through the stucco and there will be a pre-drilled hole past where the screw will go into (the board and the foundation plastic pieces are already screwed into the stucco) ... OR ... Do I use a stucco screw, a much longer screw, which will go through the wood AND the stucco?


I have both screws and am curious why you would choose one over the other. I see it this way:

Advantages to using wood --> wood screws are made for wood
Advantages to using stucco --> stucco screws will go all the way through to the stucco, which is a stronger application (unless stucco screws will destroy the wood).

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-15-16, 02:10 PM
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The A/C sets on them doesn't it? Just put a couple of dabs of construction adhesive on the bottom of those and set them in place. Mostly the A/C will hold them in place. The adhesive just helps keeps them there if there is vibration. You only want to use a couple of dabs so you have a better chance of removing them if you ever needs to.
 
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Old 07-15-16, 02:23 PM
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No, definitely not. Need to screw them in. They are small pieces that are supposed to pivot after you've drilled the a/c support, so they move or can easily slip even with heavy weight mounted, and there's no reason not to screw.

Need to know which screw to use. Thank you
 
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Old 07-16-16, 01:04 PM
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Just try a screw. If it doesn't work try a different type.

This works if you have room for mistakes. No room left (literally) for mistakes. This sounds borderline hostile.


You seem to have made this far more complicated than any install I have done.


Since I can't do anything with this statement, it comes across as you voicing frustration, which comes across as hostile.

As to screw type in 40 years I'm not sure if I have ever bought a wood screw. 90% of the time I just use a deck screw. Other times a sheet metal screw or Tapcon. Note a Tapcon screw will screw into wood as will a sheet metal screw or most any screw. I never heard of a stucco screw.


This is the answer to my question -thanks.

I am really at a loss to help you so I may not post again. You may want to consider hiring a handyman.


If I felt at a loss to help someone and I was at an online forum, I would ignore their thread.

Final thoughts: I would never put screws in an outside window sill. they can allow water either from rain or the A/C to run inside the wall and eventually rot the wall out and/or damage the inside Sheetrock. If 8000 BTU or less no extra support needed. Put it in the window, block underneath with boards, close the window on it and lock the window in place. Open the accordion panels, screw them with the enclosed screws to the window and you are done.


The a/c is more than 8,000 btu. It's illegal in some areas of the country to install a window a/c without this a/c support. The a/c has to pivot downward to allow the condensation out; placing flat boards won't accomplish this.

Ray, I don't think your attitude (at times) is right for a moderator at an Internet site (other times -helpful) because you are literally getting people from everywhere with varying degrees of expertise -or no expertise. If that's frustrating to you or makes you feel like you are of no help, that says something about you, not the person asking questions. I finished the work. DIY.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 02:32 PM
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You are correct. My post was inappropriate. I apologize.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 06:00 PM
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I'm proud of myself. I've never even used a drill. This is not my cup of tea; I hate this stuff. I did it! Yay! Probably sounds trivial to people here but to me it was a first. The a/c works great and it's SOooo much nicer. My dog is chilling and my bird isn't stressed from the heat anymore. Thanks to everybody for all the little pieces of advice.

ps: Ray, I can't remember the last time I ever heard anyone actually apologize. That is a good trait and I hope you keep it. Most people just get defensive. You're an expert and I'm a rookie with a landlord I don't want to p--- off.
 
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Old 07-16-16, 06:40 PM
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Looks nice. Thanks for letting us see the completed job. Come on back for your next project.
 
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