Vintage radial arm saw worth keeping?

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Old 02-12-17, 07:09 PM
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Vintage radial arm saw worth keeping?

Hello all,

I inherited this Craftsman 9" Radial Arm Saw model #113.29350 circa 1965 w/ extra blades and accessory kit. Needs a little cleaning and TLC but I plugged her in and she started right up and the sound reminded me of my father (RIP). I have a low end miter saw & portable stand but don't have table saw. That said, any value here? Is this vintage 9" Radial Arm Saw & kit worth keeping?
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Old 02-12-17, 07:14 PM
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Of course it is worth keeping along with likely all the accessories that must have been available at the time.
All I will say is that you need to be careful with some of the accessories because that are not guarded like a more recent tool would be.
 
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Old 02-12-17, 07:38 PM
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Yeah...I was thinking, it maybe safer to just sell it and put the $ towards a more guarded recent tool.
 
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Old 02-12-17, 08:13 PM
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Keep it and learn to use it safely. It is a better saw than the new stuff. You have a good set of accessories. That saw can be a one tool shop.
I have a 10" version and would not part with it.

RR
 
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Old 02-12-17, 09:01 PM
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Hmm? Apparently, CPSC, Emerson Tool Co. Announced a Recall of CraftsmanŽ Radial Arm Saws Sold by Sears, Roebuck and Co. because the radial arm saws were sold without a guard that covers the entire blade. The recalled CraftsmanŽ 8-, 8?-, 9- and 10-inch radial arm saws have a model number beginning with 113. Emerson will provide $100 for the return of the saw carriage of recalled radial arm saws.
 
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Old 02-12-17, 09:02 PM
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I didn't offer the safety caution for the purpose of scaring you.

I have a similar saw as a part of my shop workbench and it is a valuable addition to my toolbox.
Because it is a permanent fixture it gets used more than my sliding saw.
I am not sure of the cutting width of your saw but a radial arm saw can typically cut a much wider board than a sliding miter saw.

If you want to try it we can offer a few tips on how to do so.
 
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Old 02-12-17, 09:27 PM
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I looked up that recall and it turns out that they will pay you $100.00 to send them the motor assembly and carriage where they will destroy it so it can't be used!!!

In their recall they also advise that if you do not return the saw you must read the instructions which if those who lost hand parts had done they would not have lost any hand parts.
My dad had a similar saw and had many accessories including a chuck to use the saw as a drill press.
He read his instructions and so did I and he had and I have all our digits!
 
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Old 02-13-17, 04:00 AM
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I have a 1970 Craftsman RAS set up in the back of the shop with a very long run off table, probably 18' or so. It has its purposes, although I also have the obligatory table saw and compound miter. It won't break, so why get rid of it?
 
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Old 02-13-17, 04:35 AM
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IMO the only reasons not to keep the saw is if you absolutely have no need for it and no room .... add in the sentimental value and I'd work at finding the room for it
 
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Old 02-13-17, 05:02 AM
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Gave mine to son in law many years ago and he used it up in cabinet work. Wish I still had it.
 
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Old 02-13-17, 06:58 AM
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Ras

Sold my 9" RAS 3 years ago due to space limitations. I have wished many times since that I had kept it. GregH makes a good point about the width of boards which can be cross-cut. My advice is to keep the saw.
 
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Old 02-13-17, 07:56 AM
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FWIW, the radial arm saw market is just about non-existent. Either keep it or toss it, you're not likely to get anything selling it.
 
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Old 02-13-17, 08:54 AM
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I think you have come to the wrong place to get an unbiased opinion on getting rid of any type of tool.

Most of the moderators and regular contributors here have a strong connection to tools and cherish owning anything that can help do a job, even if they do not have an immediate or regular use for it.
Obviously by your coming to these forums you will at some point have a need for a variety of tools and the day you have a use for a radial arm saw you might be sorry you got rid of it.

The manual did not say what the width of cut is on your 9" but my vintage 10" DeWalt can do a 16" wide cut and I can do 18" with a jig I made for the table.
My sliding saw can only do 12" and have often end cut wide boards.

My suggestion is to make a stand for it if there isn't one and try it out.
There are attachments there that can do a wide array of jobs.
 
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Old 02-13-17, 12:16 PM
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I took advantage of that Emerson recall back when they would send you the parts to make it "safe", rather than offer cash to destroy it. They sent new tables, new clamps and screws for tables, new upper guard, new handle (which when squeezed would lift the guard), new pawls and splitter disc (for ripping). I didn't use any of it except for the tables.
Very glad I kept my saw--it gets more use than my tablesaw and sliding compound saw combined. With a sharp low-hook blade it's quite safe and not at all scary to use.

Keep it :-)
 
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Old 02-14-17, 08:57 AM
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I took advantage of that Emerson recall back when they would send you the parts to make it "safe", rather than offer cash to destroy it.
Bought a 10" in 89 to build my garage and received the same a while back, still sitting in the box. My table is fine but I may use the new wood they sent some day. Great saw, I'd never part with it but you do need to be careful at all times, no red stains on mine yet.


marksr
IMO the only reasons not to keep the saw is if you absolutely have no need for it and no room .... add in the sentimental value and I'd work at finding the room for it.
^^^^
 
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Old 02-14-17, 06:09 PM
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Thanks to all!
I'm going to keep it, clean it up and learn to use it safely. FWIW, upon reviewing the owner's manual, other than bevel & miter cuts, I was surprised to find out, it does the following:

USE OF A DADO HEAD
The dado_ saw (or head) is a special set of blades for cutting
grooves and dados....

MOLDING OR SHAPING
This work is performed with Craftsman Molding Cutter
Heads, and a set of cutters depending on the type of molding
cut desired. The saw is positioned in the same manner
as that described for rabbeting. Since the
position of the cutters can be adjusted with respect to the
fence and table top, any or all of the cutter shapes may
be used. The Molding Cutter Guard should be used with Molding
Cutter Head.

ROUTING AND DOVETAILING
Routing and dovetailing are accomplished with the motor
indexed and locked 90 ° from horizontal, except that this
time the externally threaded stub end (opposite the normal
blade end) is between the motor and table top. The following
chucks will mate, with this external 1/2-20 thread.

O-inch to 1/4-inch Chuck
5/64-inch to 1/2-inch Key Chuck
The following routers and dovetails are recommended:
1/8-inch router
1/4-inch router 3/8-inch dovetail
3/8-inch router 1/2-inch dovetail
t/2oinch router
5/8-inch router

Routing may be performed by either moving the work with
a stationary router, or by clamping the work to the table
and moving the router. Always approach the router bit
from the left-hand side of the saw.

BORING
The saw may be converted to a horizontal drill for boring
by using one of the recommended chucks and proper drill.
For drilling holes on an angle, the radial arm should be
positioned to the desired angle
 
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Old 02-14-17, 06:18 PM
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OK guys, job well done!
We may have infected another one.
 
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