So this threw me today...pretty sure this is dumb...but here goes.

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Old 01-08-18, 08:03 PM
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So this threw me today...pretty sure this is dumb...but here goes.

So, I have had a 3/8" corded drill, for years, that has served me well. It's a Bosch, B6100 VSR, a big heavy thing, but it's always worked great. I also had a Panasonic cordless that the batteries had died on and I just had not replaced it (batteries were ridiculously priced so I had no plans to replace them).

A few years ago, my BF gave me a Makita DT01W cordless impact driver, very small and handy, and I love it. Use it for everything, and rarely have I even bothered to pull out my old drill. (And I tossed the old Panasonic of course.)

Well twice now, this past weekend (snowed in so projects are getting done LOL), I pulled out my set of drill bits (similar to these - https://www.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-14-P...t-Set/50413714 ) and couldn't figure out how to use them in my cordless Makita. Clearly I was missing something, I thought. Looked though all my tool boxes, and couldn't come up with anything, so I wound up using a bit set that I have for the Makita. (I wanted a specific size and that was why I dug out the Dewalt set). I didn't feel like using the Bosch - it's bulky and heavier and the Makita is just so much easier to use.

So I went online, and found that I would need a "chuck adapter" to use those old drill bits with the cordless. And I have plenty of other bits as well, that will only fit my Bosch. So...if I wanted to get a new cordless drill that would use my older bits, what sort of drill do I look for? A "chuck" drill? And why the difference, exactly? I mean, other than the quick-release aspect, is there a reason for the straight smooth drill bits to be even used any more? Or are they really the better thing to use if drilling a hole?

Is there any reason to use the older style, instead of say, these, which can be used in my Makita?
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DD5160.../dp/B017KUENH8

Laugh if you wish...I swear I had never even realized that these things were not interchangeable. Duh.
 
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Old 01-08-18, 08:11 PM
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Technically an impact driver is not a drill. One big reason is the speed it spins at.
Many people use them as a drill. I always use separate tools.
 
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Old 01-08-18, 08:16 PM
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Well you don't usually do a lot of hole drilling with an impact. Impacts have quick change connectors. Drills have chucks. You generally drill holes with a drill, not an impact.

Drills and impacts are not the same.

But you can buy drill bit sets with the quick connect hex heads... but they are usually only useful in the small sizes.
 
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Old 01-09-18, 03:31 AM
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I have several small sets of the drill bits with the quick hex head connects. I'm not overly fond of them and whether it's the drill bits fault or mine - I always seem to break the small ones
 
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Old 01-09-18, 06:18 PM
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Ok...I guess "impact" just was not a meaningful term for me. To me, they all look like drills!

So I guess I want to look for a small cordless DRILL then, to use those old bits. I did find this article. That helps!

When to use…

Drills

Driving screws into wood, drywall, and other soft material
Tightening/loosening bolts that don’t require an extreme amount of torque
Drilling holes in wood, drywall, and other soft materials

Impact Drivers
Driving screws into wood or metal (you can use it for drywall if you’ve got a lower speed/torque option)
Driving large diameter screws or lag bolts
Tightening/loosening bolts, including those that should be very tight or have been stuck
Drilling holes in wood, drywall or metal using new impact driver designed drill bits

Hammer Drills
Driving screws into wood, drywall, and other soft material (in drill only mode)
Tightening/loosening bolts (in drill only mode)
Drilling holes in wood, drywall, and other soft materials (in drill only mode)
Drilling holes in concrete, masonry, or stone (in hammer drill mode)

Drill vs Impact Driver vs Hammer Drill… What Should I Buy?
This is a tough question to answer since there are so many different needs out there. If you are only going to buy one product, I’d go with the impact driver. New bits allow you to do everything with it that you can do with a traditional drill, so you’re only missing out on the hammering action needed for concrete type materials.

If you can afford to buy a two tool kit and know or think you’ll be drilling into concrete/stone, go with an impact driver/hammer drill kit. Even without the special bits, the hammer drill should have a drill only mode that allows it to operate exactly like a drill, and then you’ll also have the impact driver for when you need more torque with nuts/bolts and lag bolts. If you’re not going be around those masonry applications, stick with a drill/impact driver kit.
 
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Old 01-10-18, 06:15 AM
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I would get a cordless drill in addition to the impact driver you currently own. You could get a Makita that uses the same batteries so you can interchange them as needed. Or, you could look for a whole set. I have a 18v Ryobi set that I keep at home that was relatively inexpensive and it has done very well.
 
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Old 01-10-18, 06:33 AM
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That's exactly what I think I am going to do. I think this one takes the same batteries. Looks very similar to mine.

https://www.amazon.com/Makita-FD02ZW.../dp/B00NW4K9SE
 
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Old 01-11-18, 04:22 AM
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"Well you don't usually do a lot of hole drilling with an impact. Impacts have quick change connectors. Drills have chucks. You generally drill holes with a drill, not an impact."

Well I've ONLY used my impact driver, for either task, ever since I got it.

Before I got my Makita impact driver, I used my old drills (corded and cordless) for both tasks. Never even thought about needing anything else. When I got the Makita, I never considered that this was a "different" tool, and frankly the BF didn't say anything about it - just that I would find that it would be more efficient for me.

And since the Makita had the drilling bits along with the fastener bits, I did not think any differently about it. Honestly that is the first time I have ever even thought about the two tasks (drilling a hole vs. driving a fastener) as being different, as far as the tool itself. Anytime I have needed to either put in a screw, or drill a hole, in my mind I am going to get my "drill".

I did find some great videos that explain the difference very well, and now I get it. I feel a tiny bit bit smarter now. Thanks for the help.
 
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