Keeping Rust from returning

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Old 11-10-18, 06:13 AM
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Keeping Rust from returning

What works well at keeping rust from returning on tools?

I had some clamps and other tools that were rusted. I soaked them in WD-40 Specialist Rust Remover Soak which actually worked very well at removing the rust but I noticed that in certain spots the rust soon starts to reappear. It's not bad (seems to occur on the clamps in the areas where you can't get to - i.e. where the threads become unexposed) and there's no comparison to when I tried using vinegar. The vinegar worked "ok" at removing the rust but in minutes/hours rust started reappearing.

Since these are tools I would prefer not to use something greasy to coat them or paint them. Any recommendations?

In addition the WD-40 Specialist Rust Remover Soak worked great but does anyone have any experience compared to another product that I've read about which seems to get very good reviews -"Metal Rescue - Rust Remover Bath"

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Old 11-10-18, 06:39 AM
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So the saying goes, rust never sleeps.

Wiping down with oil, a coat of primer, not paint, or a light coating of rust converter will help slow down the return.

Keeping items in the house, climate controlled, vs shed or garage also helps.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 07:57 AM
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T-9 Boeshield is probably the best product to coat and protect.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 08:51 AM
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Do not confuse rust removers with rust preventers. Many rust removers are acids that dissolve away the rust but they don't contain the oils or other chemicals to prevent rust.

If you don't want anything on your tools (paint, oily film...) then there isn't much you can do. Something has to be there to protect the metal. There is no magical, invisible, undetectable rust preventer. Something has to be there to prevent rust.

I give a second vote for T-9. I've been using it for years. It does leave a waxy residue for protection but it doesn't come off as easily as oil. WD-40 also works pretty well. Spray your tools with it and wipe it down so there is a thin film. After a day or two the lighter penetrating solvents evaporate away leaving behind a very thin coating of rust preventing oil.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 12:45 PM
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Thanks for the info - Yes I knew there was a difference between removers or preventers. The removal stuff I used work really well. It's more about preventing its return.

Do you have experience with wax? I heard butcher's wax works well.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 03:05 PM
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I've also used beeswax and linseed oil with pretty good results.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 03:32 PM
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I put Johnson's paste wax on my portable planer, but that's more to keep the surfaces slick. It does seem to be rust free as well so that's a bonus.
 
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Old 11-10-18, 04:17 PM
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I use Johnson's paste wax too on the drill press post and table and the table saw, and it is effective, but not sure how convenient it would be on hand tools, etc. I've meant for a long time to try T9 because I've heard that it's good, but WD40 or a lightly oiled rag has worked well for me. You'll frequently hear of people using WD40 as a lubricant or to free rusty bolts or whatever, and it doesn't work well in those applications because that's not what it's made for, but I think it does a decent job for minimizing rust. In my machinists box, I lay very lightly oiled rags over my micrometers, calipers, etc. after I've wiped them off and laid them in place. I have liners, some of them nothing more than heavy cardboard, but still liners in the drawers in my roll arounds and mechanics boxes, because I think that something like that tempers the temperature changes better than metal to metal, so not stopping condensation but minimizing it at least a little bit. And I need to pick up some more, but have also started putting silica packs in the drawers.
 
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