Want to get small chain saw- info on pole saws

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Old 08-22-19, 05:09 AM
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Want to get small chain saw- info on pole saws

What can you share with me on these items?Don
t wish to spend a ton of money -proffesional cutters job do that
any help is apreicated bob s
 
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Old 08-22-19, 06:19 AM
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Bob, you mentioned your shoulder in your post on regular non-powered pole saws, so I think you would likely find a powered one too difficult given that circumstance. You hold the end with the motor at your side and that part isn't bad, but it's supporting the cutting end that wears on you, and it of course gets heavier the farther it's extended. But you're the only one who knows for sure, so my best suggestion would be to go by a local yard and garden center, hardware store, big box, or wherever, and literally put your hands on a manual one and a powered one. Or now's the time of year for them, so you might find some on display at one of the county fairs. Either way, you wouldn't need to actually cut anything because I can assure you that they do work, but at least hold one up like you would use it and see how it feels.
 
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Old 08-22-19, 07:08 AM
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Thank you Pedro I will do that "good idea." ideas for me thinking them up-are getting tougher with age bob s
 
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Old 08-22-19, 07:30 AM
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So two options, manual or gas powered .

I have both.

They both have about the same height capabilities, the hand saw is maybe good for max 4" branch, I've cut much larger with the gas, it's got a 12" bar.

Gas is less work but the saw gets heavy once that branch is cut and your supporting the entire weight as well as getting the hell out of the way of that branch falling down!
 
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Old 08-23-19, 04:20 AM
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Thank you for dropping by with this information.It will help. in my decision~ on what to buy Marq1. Bob s
 
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Old 08-23-19, 04:46 AM
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I understand that some people here may not agree with my suggestion but I am speaking from "hard learned" experience.

Try a battery operated pole saw.
My wife stayed after me to get her one of these because a gas powered saw was too heavy for her. I kept telling her that she didnt want to waste her money on a battery powered pole saw but she continually insisted. So, after several months of trying to convince her, I finally just went & spent the $120 & brought it home.

We have five acres with about 15 or so huge hickory & oak trees in the yard area along with other trees. We have used this thing unbelievably & it really surprised me. I have no regrets buying this thing.

Now why "hard learned" experience? Cause my wife keeps saying... I told you so. Oh well.
We got the 18v Ryobi.
 
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Old 08-23-19, 07:32 AM
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Good suggestion Dixie, and you won’t hear any disagreement from me. I do not have a battery powered one, but have both gas and manual, and a battery one might be a really good match in this case.
 
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Old 08-24-19, 10:21 AM
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I borrowed an electric pole saw.Not used yet but/This electric type are hard to hold up too.Thinking on getting my handy man to cut this limb----------------------------If he will bob s

ps;I am 75 I can't even hold -her [wifes]hand-like i used to!.thanks to all the "swell fellows"~~ that posted help for me and this Damn limb. bob s
 
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Old 08-24-19, 12:17 PM
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I've use the gas powered ones (well balanced with blade at front and engine at back) as well as the corded-electrical ones (top heavy because the motor is at the front).

Best advice I can give to stop by your local big-box tool store and pickup the display model. Hold each style for about 5 minutes to get a feel for the weight and balance.
When I was doing treework, if I was going to be stuck with a pole clipper all day, I'd grab a tree-climbers belt so that I could place a carabiner hook into the hollow pole to support most of the weight of the pole- you might be able to do something similar to transfer the weight from your shoulders to your hips.

I actually got one of the HF corded ones for pruning, then swapped out the tiny 6" blade for a 14" gas saw blade- This makes it easier for small branches, but leaves the saw underpowered for actual large cutting. Nevertheless, I dropped and bucked two 35' tall multi-stem maple trees with this tiny saw, just kept the blade sharp and took my time.
- A few weeks later, my neighbor across the street got a corded electric pole saw to trim a 300' long driveway. He found that he didn't have enough extension cord, BUT THEN remembered he had a generator, started it, plugged the saw into the generator, and wheeled the generator down the driveway as he cut.
 

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Old 08-25-19, 12:06 PM
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Powered pole saws are a major advantage when standing on ladder. I have 20 foot aluminum telescoping pole tree trimmer that can be awkward to use when standing on ground. When standing on extension ladder it can be difficult and dangerous to use.

On ladder powered pole saws are especially good for things that out of reach or take a lot sawing. Am getting older so balance and strength issues are a deciding influence.
 
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Old 08-25-19, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by doughess
Powered pole saws are a major advantage
I should add, they also make it MUCH easier to take a branch down in small bites - something which gets VERY tiring when you're using a hand-powered saw on a pole.
 
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Old 08-25-19, 04:18 PM
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Yeah, when possible, as in easy enough to reach and on a day when I feel like I've had my Wheaties and can hold it up there for the additional cuts, I generally will cut larger limbs into fireplace length as I go. Sometimes that doesn't work though, and particularly on something like say a maple where you need to make that undercut first holding the saw up there and cutting from the bottom can be a bit of a chore. So what I do in that case sometimes is cut it from the top but out from the trunk an extra foot or so, let her come down, cut the bark if it didn't break off, then make one clean cut to get the foot or so that I have left.
 
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Old 08-25-19, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by aka pedro
holding the saw up there and cutting from the bottom can be a bit of a chore.
GRIN- you would be amazed at the ART of cutting, dropping, and flipping tree limbs.

You have an amazing amount of control if you're up IN the tree, roped in with a chain saw.

If you want a limb to drop flat, you cut UP from the bottom, then down fast at full throttle. The tip of the limb and the base will drop straight down and hit the ground at the same time.

If you want a limb to fold down for the ground-crew to grab, you score a rip-stop on the bottom to keep the bark from peeling back, then slowly cut down- if you're really good ( I was, back in the day) you can do it with one slow cut. When you're starting, you make a series of 3 smaller cuts to carefully fold the limb down.

You can ALSO convert that downward motion to significant sideways motion to swing a branch away from you/house/garden, using a slow diagonal cut.

If you're good, you can cut through a branch pushing down, then pull up and catch the end of the branch and use the top of the chain to shoot it in the direction you want.

Finally, if you're really good, and have a springy pin oak with summertime sap, you can flop a branch so that it swings towards the base of the tree, the tips of the branch catch the ground, and the branch springs back the other way- I think I got about 11 out of 15 to actually drop and spring over so that they were facing the chippper.

pruning

If you want a limb to drop straigh

I even remember the BEST work I've done about 12 branches in a limbs that
 
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