Best Tool for Cutting 1/2" From 8' Plywood Cabinet Panels (1/2" Crosscut)

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Old 09-09-19, 11:54 AM
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Best Tool for Cutting 1/2" From 8' Plywood Cabinet Panels (1/2" Crosscut)

I have RTA cabinets that I am installing in my kitchen. One of them is a floor to ceiling pantry cabinet constructed with 8' tall panels (96" H, 24" D). Due to my ceiling being 95.75", I need to take off approximately 1/2" from each panel (1/2" crosscut). I'm trying to figure out the best way to accomplish this.

The options that come to mind are a table saw or a circular saw, but I'm not sure if I'm missing a better option. My understanding is that table saws are better for rip cuts, but I assume that it could work. I would have to rent one. My concern with the circular saw is getting a straight cut, but I could buy one of those aluminum tracks. I have a sliding miter saw, but I don't think it can accommodate something this wide.

I appreciate any advice or suggestions. I am very new at this type of work, so I am trying to learn as much as possible.
 
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Old 09-09-19, 12:08 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd probably clamp a straight edge to the panel and use a skil saw with a fine tooth blade.
 
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Old 09-09-19, 12:11 PM
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I'd probably clamp a straight edge to the panel and use a skil saw with a fine tooth blade.
That's a good idea. Thank you.
 
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Old 09-09-19, 03:19 PM
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I would suggest you make a jig, similar to the one I described in this thread.

​​​​​​https://www.doityourself.com/forum/d...ing-apart.html

Only difference being that you would probably want to put the good side of your plywood facing down, so that your finish blade is coming up into it. If both sides need to look good (no splinters) you will need to score your cut line with a knife and stay to one side of that cut.
 
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Old 09-09-19, 03:52 PM
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Be sure to double check the final height you need as when you try to stand it up the high corner swings a bit higher. many carpenters have discovered geometry when that happens.

Bud
 
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Old 09-09-19, 04:04 PM
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Be sure to double check the final height you need as when you try to stand it up the high corner swings a bit higher. many carpenters have discovered geometry when that happens.
Yup, the math is easy enough, but stuff still happens. Sometimes, depending on the depth, height of baseboard, etc., you might be able to cut and conceal a radius at the bottom back corner. Hint: A squared plus B squared equals C squared.
 
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Old 09-10-19, 05:42 AM
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There should be a separate toe kick platform to support the pantry. Install this toe kick platform first. Then add the main part of the pantry. This will allow you to stand the pantry before installing on the platform.
 
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