Air moisture filter for Mastercraft air compressor

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Old 10-16-19, 10:39 AM
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Air moisture filter for Mastercraft air compressor

I bought Mastercraft Air compressor (8 Gallon) like this one and I also bought Air Tools kit something like this to change my vehicle's winter tires.

While reading different articles I understand its good to have air moisture filter installed because otherwise moisture can get in to the tool and reduce its life. I visited Canadian Tires to find appropriate filter but got confused because they have different kind of variety.

I need help which air moisture filter is best suitable for my setup.
 
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Old 10-16-19, 10:43 AM
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Moisture traps/filters work best when they are mounted away from the compressor [so the air has time to cool down and condense] but I did use a small one mounted next to the regulator when I lived in fla [where it's extra humid]

Unless you live in a real humid climate you shouldn't have any issues with moisture harming your tools. Draining the tank every day and oiling the tools is probably enough.
 
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Old 10-16-19, 11:15 AM
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Unless you live in a real humid climate
Climate and usage!

Since it's portable that probably means it wont get a ton of use and most of the water separators are intended to be hard plumbed,.

Here are some small inline units that are better than nothing but I wouldn't worry too much and just do as Marksr recommended.

https://www.amazon.com/Air-Water-Sep.../dp/B01AD3HBK0
 
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Old 10-16-19, 11:30 AM
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I used my air compressor in near past for dust cleaning, and i saw some water small drops in air, i believe that means we need some filter?
 
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Old 10-16-19, 12:02 PM
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How long had it been since you drained the water off of the tank? what type of climate are you in?
 
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Old 10-16-19, 12:15 PM
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I drain water every time after finish use, I'm in Saskatchewan I don't think its too humid here.

I just want to clear my past statement while dusting there were just few drops in water.
 
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Old 10-16-19, 02:10 PM
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Not trying to say a water separator isn't useful but in drier climates it isn't as necessary. As mentioned above they work best when mounted on the wall away from the air compressor. Most are in the way or prone to get broken when mounted on a portable tank.
 
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Old 10-16-19, 03:49 PM
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A number of factors involved, the fact it takes about 8 cubic feet of atmosphere to produce 1 cubic foot of compressed air, essentially wringing it out like a sponge, the heat of compression, the air temperature drop through an orifice, etc., etc., but the bottom line is that, even in less humid areas, there is moisture in the air. And that moisture is a harmless vapor going in and at some point, when it cools to a certain point, becomes a less harmless liquid. But filters only capture the liquid, so the trick is to have your filter in the most opportune point in the system, which is the reason Mark suggested getting it downstream as far as possible. Even then though, the temperature is going to drop further as it goes through the orifice of your blow gun, so more moisture drops out. And unless you were to run maybe a hundred feet of hose, maybe more, the air is not going to cool enough for the filer to be effective. Under different circumstances, a dryer is used, either a refrigerated one that drops the temperature to a predetermined dew point, causing the air to cool to the point that the moisture is free to fall and be captured, or a desiccant type. And there are a few other less common approaches, but all of them fall into the impractical category for home use. So a filter might help, but my guess is that it's not going to do much and that you just have to accept a few drips here and there. But definitely keep draining your tank as you are because you will continue to collect some of the moisture there.
 
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Old 10-17-19, 04:38 AM
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An occasional drop of water is a normal occurance and not a problem that warrants anyhing more than regularly draining the air tank.
The only time this would be a concern is when spray painting and I handle that by using a water separator only while painting.

A good flushing with WD-40 and re-oiling once or twice a year will keep your air tools happy.
 
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Old 10-17-19, 05:35 AM
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A good flushing with WD-40 and re-oiling once or twice a year will keep your air tools happy.
A good habit to get into is to put a couple drops of oil in the tool EVERY time it's used, even every day.

That way you are guaranteed to have your tools oiled other wise the chance of forgetting is great and a ruined tool is in the making!
 
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Old 10-17-19, 07:21 AM
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Agree. My air tools, except for a couple of trim nailers that don't use oil, get a couple of drops every time I use them, and for continuous use, say roofing nailers, they get a couple of drops at coffee and lunch breaks.
 
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Old 10-18-19, 08:42 AM
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A good flushing with WD-40
GregH What is flushing process and what is WD-40
 
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Old 10-18-19, 09:40 AM
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WD-40 is a light weight oil that is usually sold in an aerosol form.
It's origin is believed to come from the military use of cleaning and removing moisture from firearms.
It is a lubricant but is very thin and tends to evaporate.

Many people, myself included use it as a cleaner rather than a lubricant.
If you were to use it to clean an air tool you would disconnect the airline, use the straw nozzle normally included, hold the gun's trigger and spray generously into the gun.
You then need to hold a rag over the air discharge, hook up the air to the gun and operate It at full speed until all the WD is exhausted.
Then apply air tool oil right away and as needed.

You would be surprised at what comes out of a well used air tool.
 
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Old 11-12-19, 09:56 AM
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A good flushing with WD-40 and re-oiling once or twice a year will keep your air tools happy.
Which oil should i use for re-oiling the tool, i will be buying from Canadian Tires.
 
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Old 11-12-19, 10:02 AM
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Use regular air tool oil, if you can't find it 3n1 oil will also work.
 
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