oil type for air compressor

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Old 07-15-20, 11:43 AM
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oil type for air compressor

I have a Makita model MAC700 air compressor of which I'm planning on changing the oil. The manual states SAE 30W is one of the recommended viscosities but I'm wondering whether detergent oil is acceptable, as the manual doesn't say. I called Makita and asked them and the guy said to be sure to use non-detergent but I'm just wanting an opinion or comment or two here as I'm not sure that guy really know (he didn't sound like it).
 
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Old 07-15-20, 11:47 AM
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You want non detergent oil for a compressor.
There are several reasons for non d but one is no foaming.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 11:50 AM
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non-detergent it shall be then. thank you
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:06 PM
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Or you could just go to Lowes or Home Depot and get a bottle of oil marked, Air Compressor Oil, so there won't be any question that you have the correct oil.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:11 PM
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That's what I always do.
I always figured 20w non detergent was for when you couldn't find compressor oil.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:13 PM
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Or you could just go to Lowes or Home Depot and get a bottle of oil marked, Air Compressor Oil, so there won't be any question that you have the correct oil.
There is no Lowes or Home Depot where I live, so can't do that. Thanks anyway though.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:18 PM
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I think the last time I bought compressor oil it was at Harbor Freight. Point being there are other places that sell it ..... not that there is anything wrong with using 20w non detergent.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:23 PM
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I always figured 20w non detergent was for when you couldn't find compressor oil.
The manual for my compressor states I can use SAE 10W, SAE 20W, or SAE 30W, depending on "ambient temperatures at point of operation." So I chose 30W as it suits my situation better than 20W would.

The uses mentioned for the non-detergent SAE 30W I just bought at the hardware store here states that "among other non-critical applications where a general purpose oil is desired" air compressors is included.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:29 PM
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not that there is anything wrong with using 20w non detergent.
I used 30w non-detergent. So is there some implication here that there is something wrong with me using that viscosity as opposed to the 20w then? As it's been mentioned twice now here that 20w (not 30w) non-detergent is the supposed "go-to" if there is not a bottle marked Air Compressor oil at the store?
 
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Old 07-15-20, 01:49 PM
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I don't know for certain, just that I've always heard 20w non detergent could be used in air compressors.
Since you are further north, will 30w work ok during the winter?
 
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Old 07-15-20, 02:35 PM
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Royal Purple® Synfilm® Recip. 100 is recommended for lubrication of reciprocating air compressors (piston type) that specify a SAE 30 or a “non-detergent” 30 weight oil.

Simply the best, you dont change the oil that often and having one that froze up during the polar vortex of 2012-13, this is all I use now!


https://www.royalpurple.com/product/...ompressor-oil/
 
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Old 07-15-20, 02:51 PM
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Since you are further north, will 30w work ok during the winter?
Well now that you're asking I'm double checking the recommended viscosity chart from the manual, which lists as follows:

AMBIENT TEMPERATURES AT POINT OF OPERATION

16°C TO 0°C (3.2°F - 32°F) SAE 10W
1°C TO 26°C (33.8°F - 78.8°F) SAE 20W
ABOVE 27°C (80.6°F) SAE 30W

So apparently 30W would definitely be the wrong viscosity to use, because if I am interpreting it correctly it was always need to be an ambient temperature of 80.6 or above for 30W to be proper. Correct?
 
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Old 07-15-20, 03:20 PM
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Correct. You use the oil weight that is rated for the temperature it will be used in. For example, if it is only being used indoors (and room temperature is 68-72F) you would use 20W. If you're outside in Nebraska in the summertime you would use 30W. If you are using it outside in Nebraska in the winter months, you would use 10W.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 04:50 PM
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Wow thanks, good thing I double checked on this. I had been quick to just assume 30W would be fine for my climate and typical ambient temperature range(s) in which I would be likely to use the machine. But nope. Now I'll have to drain that new 30W I just put in, and go with 20W.

I think I got the 30W confused with the multi-viscosity 10w-30w I'm used to using for my vehicles and such around here. Quite a difference though between the two!

Dang now what am gonna do with that 30W oil I drain from my compressor plus the extra in the quart container I just bought for $4.99?
 
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Old 07-15-20, 04:53 PM
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Pretty sure it will be fine until it starts to get colder this fall. The biggest issue is the viscosity at cold startup... since as the compressor runs it usually heats up the oil no matter what. I'd leave it in until fall.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 05:35 PM
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Use the 30W you pulled out for the lawn mower.

I ran 30W in my compressor year round. In the winter it got down to around 55° in that part of the shop.
Never had a problem.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 06:07 PM
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Inside where I'll be using most of the time the ambient temperature is 65 F. That's not even close to the minimum of 80.6. It never gets that warm inside or outside where I live.

So probably shouldn't think about using the 30W in the lawn mower either, as suggested. Don't get warm enough here.
Seems like I'm dealing with some contradictory info here. Not sure what to do.
Actually, though when I called Makita support the same guy that just automatically told me to use non-detergent automatically also said to use 30W, without knowing where I live or the temperature circumstances. Just said use non-detergent, then said 30w.
 
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Old 07-15-20, 07:57 PM
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Thats because 30W is the standard.

If anything seems contradictory it's because we know you are in Alaska (we all assume cold) and you didnt tell us how/where you plan on using it until just now. Now we know its going to be used inside at 65F.

Like I said... the weight of oil is really only a factor at startup. If its 0F out, and you have 30w in, it, it's not going to want to turn over quickly, which draws more amps and can blow a fuse or breaker.

In your case, the difference between 65F and 80F is minimal as far as startup is concerned. 30W performs fine down to probably 32F. You can consult small engines charts that tell you so. Another reference chart. And once it starts, the compressor generates it's own heat, and the more it runs, it heats up the oil above 80F. So either 20 or 30W would be fine IMO if you always plan to use it indoors.

Your instructions make it sound like it is clear cut when to stop using one and start using the other. In reality it's really not that clear cut. Even straight weight engine oils have a wide range of temperatures they perform at. But once you hit the high temperature on the chart, (the temperature when the compressor is first started) you definitely want to think about going to the next higher weight because otherwise the lower weight oil would be too thin at the higher temperature.
 
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Last edited by XSleeper; 07-15-20 at 08:14 PM.
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