Which Type of Nail Gun?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-23-20, 02:12 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 12
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Which Type of Nail Gun?

I want to nail plywood flooring onto rafters but I've never used a nail gun before. Do I need a finishing or framing nailer? Electric or pneumatic? Rent one or buy one and sell it when I'm done?
 
  #2  
Old 11-23-20, 02:41 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 615
Received 40 Votes on 32 Posts
You didn't say, but if the flooring is only going to be used for storage you only need a hammer since you will be using very few nails, just enough to keep the wood in place with no movement.
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-20, 04:15 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,910
Received 123 Votes on 98 Posts
I would not buy a nailer if you don't think you will have a further use for it. I would go old school and use a hammer and ring nails.
Besides, pounding nails with a hammer can be very therapeutic.
 
Norm201 voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 11-23-20, 04:18 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 24,472
Received 755 Votes on 694 Posts
For nailing subflooring down you would use a framing nail gun. Pneumatic is really only an option if you have an air compressor.
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-20, 05:19 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,940
Received 427 Votes on 398 Posts
Unless you think it will get more use, just get some general purpose screws!
 
  #6  
Old 11-24-20, 06:26 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,943
Received 137 Votes on 119 Posts
Originally Posted by Marq1
[img]https://www.doityourself.com/forum/avatars/carlift.gif[/img]just get some general purpose screws!
Agreed

I'd ALSO suggest investing in a good battery operated drill/screwdriver, with a quick disconnect screw chuck.
 
  #7  
Old 11-24-20, 07:25 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,493
Received 292 Votes on 262 Posts
I agree with the all of the above. I like Hal's suggestion, You'll get a lot more use of it.
Besides electric/battery nailers are very expensive.
 
  #8  
Old 11-30-20, 09:36 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 12
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks to all who responded. I intend to use the space for storage so I'll try to do the job with an old-fashioned hammer and nails. If my aging arm gets too tired I'll use a drill and wood screws.
 
  #9  
Old 11-30-20, 11:00 AM
2
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA near Boston, MA
Posts: 1,024
Received 71 Votes on 61 Posts
If there is a finished ceiling below, I would go with driving screws instead of hammering nails to avoid any cracking, etc. especially if it is a plaster ceiling.
 
Balrog49 voted this post useful.
  #10  
Old 11-30-20, 12:41 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,943
Received 137 Votes on 119 Posts
Originally Posted by 2john02458
If there is a finished ceiling below, I would go with driving screws instead of hammering nails to avoid any cracking, etc. especially if it is a plaster ceiling.
Excellent point. Especially if you're hammering by hand.

I'm in an old farmhouse where the interior walls are lapped boards, lathe, clay & horsehair mortar, then plaster & paint. I've got a big compressor, so I DO use a nail gun, or a pin nailer/stapler. They are REALLY useful because they drive the fastener into the wall in one shot; repeated hammering just makes the wall fall apart (don't ask me how I know)

Quick tip - If you use any type of pneumatic nailer, add ball valves to the male connectors of your air hoses.
When you have 1or 2 nails/pins/staples that are JUST just outside the reach of the air hose, you close the valve, undo the quick-connect, and there will be enough high pressure air in the hose to drive those last few fasteners. Even the tiny yellow plastic coil hoses store enough air for 2 shots from a small pin nailer.


 
2john02458 voted this post useful.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: