Radial Arm Saw Alignment Problem


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Old 11-25-22, 11:18 PM
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Radial Arm Saw Alignment Problem

I realize the radial arm saw is considered "old fashioned," but it has always
been my favorite stationary power tool. I have two. An 8-1/4 inch and a 10 inch.

The 8-1/4" Craftsman saw has a serious alignment problem. I don't want to
junk this saw, but I'll have no choice if it can't be fixed. When I raise and
lower the radial arm, the blade does not return to the crosscut in the table.
In fact, it's way off the 90 degree mark. All the alignment screws are properly
torqued. There are no loose or stripped screws. I always make sure everything
is locked down tight before starting the motor.

I have a set of precision knife edge squares that are used for aligning both
radial arm saws. I do not notice any problems when I follow the alignment
procedure for the 8-1/4" saw. The 90 degree crosscut is gone, the first time
I raise and lower the radial arm after completing the alignment procedure.
 
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Old 12-02-22, 12:38 AM
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Thanks to all you guys for replying to my post.

I found the cause and solution to the alignment problem. Yippee!!

Any machine with components that are under constant stress for years can develop
metal fatigue. I removed all miter and radial arm support components. These two
groups control the up and down or side-to-side movement of the radial arm.

All components were carefully examined under a swing arm magnifying lamp, similar
to the linked image. The only component that looked problematic was the 1/2 x 13 arm
support bolt. In the owner's manual it's key number 23 and part number STD525025.

https://i.postimg.cc/2jMHmSF3/swing-...fying-lamp.jpg

I sprayed the bolt with a fluorescing dye. Under a black light several minuscule fissures
are visible. I replaced the bolt and all the misalignment problems are resolved. The
carriage (and blade) do not vary from the 90 degree mark when I raise and lower the
radial arm.

In a local auto or plumbing supply store you might find a fluorescent dye kit with a black
light. They are available online. The dye illuminated by a black light make visible miniscule
cracks in pipes, engine blocks, or almost anything made of metal.
 
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Old 11-26-22, 06:02 AM
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For specific help, you need to post a model number.
 
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Old 11-26-22, 06:58 AM
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When you say: "In fact, it's way off the 90 degree mark."

What is "way off"? 1/32" or 1"

Off the top of my head it could be something like a small piece of wood stuck back near the hinge of the neck causing it to become out of alignment when you raise it up & start back down. The little piece of debris in there is pushing the head to one side causing it to miss its mark. But that's just a wild guess without any further info.
 
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Old 11-26-22, 12:54 PM
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something has to be off on it allowing it to go out of alignment would check for play at the hinge may have some worn parts.
 
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Old 11-26-22, 02:42 PM
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The rear column has probably got broken gear teeth or some other such problem if the column arm isn't staying locked square as it goes up and down. But all we can do is guess with no model. They made dozens of versions, all slightly different.
 
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Old 11-27-22, 11:46 PM
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Craftsman Model Number: 113.234701

The radial arm cranks up and down smoothly. The trouble is, I can't find anything
wrong with this saw! If you slightly raise the blade above the crosscut and pull
the carriage, it gradually moves away from the 90 degree mark. When the carriage
reaches the rubber stop bumper it's definitely misaligned. If I was foolish enough
to start the motor, the blade would ruin the fence.

I cleaned and lubricated all saw components. It didn't help. Maybe if I completely
dismantle the saw and examine everything I'll find the cause of this misalignment
problem.
 
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Old 11-28-22, 05:48 AM
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Troubleshooting begins on page 73. https://www.manualslib.com/manual/48...age=73#manual9

I would assume it's the miter lock that needs adjustment.
 
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Old 11-29-22, 10:58 PM
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I've got the original user manual and it's very good. These days, most user manuals
are incomplete or poorly translated from other languages.

The troubleshooting section refers back to the assembly and alignment procedures.
It's possible I made an error or overlooked something obvious. The user manual
is needed when you purchase any complex stationary power tool. After awhile
alignment procedures are memorized and the manual is no longer required.

I'll perform the alignment procedure again and I'll definitely focus my attention on
the miter lock.
 
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Old 11-30-22, 06:12 AM
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My former employer back in the 90s had one, and had to completely disassemble it to find out what was wrong and if I remember correctly, the gear teeth that were vertically mounted on the column had broken into sections... He had to pitch it.
 
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Old 12-01-22, 07:11 AM
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Page 33 of the manual (Squaring Blade Cross-cut Travel). Loosen the four bolts near the elevation crank to adjust the cross-cut angle.
 
 

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