Right tool for the job - baseboard install

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  #1  
Old 12-11-01, 07:43 AM
JodyCanuck
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Right tool for the job - baseboard install

Installing baseboard (finally) in my basement after 5 years of construction. On inside corners all the books and leaflets say to make a coped joint where the two baseboards meet. Either I am an idiot or my lack of paitience is shining through but I cannot get a decent coped joint. Is there a trick? Is there a better or even a power tool that would assist?

The guy who did the upstairs did a marvelous job. I am working with an oak baseboard with a pretty generic detail on it. I always cut a 45 on the end I need to cope and then use the 45 as a guide for my little coping saw.

Please help!!
 
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Old 12-11-01, 03:03 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: massachusetts
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Work slow and steady.,

Cut the molding with a compound to 45.
Heres a few tips that work for me
1. place a square on the molding and score it with a sharp utility knife before taking the coping saw to it.
2. Angle the coping saw so it back cuts into the meat of the molding. (As the front edge will be thinner, you will be able to press it against the molding.
3. Do not nail the piece of molding the cope will but to until you test fit the coped piece so you can shim or adjust if necessary.
4. Score light of the final mark on the top formed part of the molding so you can lightly widdle finish with the utility knife as a coping saw can break up the thinner wood too easily. Widdle this section back a bit so it too can be pressed into the molding it butts.
5. Use a good quality coping saw with a good blade.
6. and most important. Cope first/ cut molding to length second.........self explanantory........
 
  #3  
Old 12-12-01, 08:12 AM
JodyCanuck
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Thanks StephenS, I'll give it a try. Just a couple questions for clarification.

You state:
1. place a square on the molding and score it with a sharp utility knife before taking the coping saw to it.
Do I do this on the front or back of the molding? The baseboard I am using has a rounde profile to it with a couple of detail lines in the middle.

4. Score light of the final mark on the top formed part of the molding so you can lightly widdle finish with the utility knife as a coping saw can break up the thinner wood too easily. Widdle this section back a bit so it too can be pressed into the molding it butts.
I assume what you are getting at here is that because the molding has a rounded top on it you need to hand carve this detail to get a snugger fit. I don't understand the purpose fo the scoring statement in both of your suggestions.

Thanks again,
 
  #4  
Old 12-12-01, 10:10 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 589
Your correct on number 4.
I score the face of the molding. The purpose it two fold. one is to give the saw a line to travel and two is (if you cope slightly to the side that is being discarded then the coping saw will be less likely to splinter any detail work on the molding.

In addition a good set of files can be useul for final touches to the coped molding.
 
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