sharpening center

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  #1  
Old 05-29-02, 03:39 AM
arthropod98
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sharpening center

back again with another question.

i JUST received my delta sharpening center yesterday, and i started playing with it. but, i'm wondering if you could direct me somewhere for some basic sharpening tips?? or, is there a book you could recommend??

thanks in advance!!
 
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Old 05-30-02, 08:50 PM
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Hello: arthropod98

Basic sharpening {very basic} is simply follow {Restore} the orginal angle on the tool. That's basic as basic can get and close to the same method taught in sharpening schools.

The sharpening center you purchased should contain basic instructions to follow for the tools that machinery center is designed to sharpen. Read and study the instructions carefully.

About the only person who may or may not still have basic sharpening bookets and manuals for sale is David Hambe. The only phone number I have to contact him may or may not still be apply. Call {612} 757-5776.

Sharpening books are specialty items but should be available searching online or in a large retail chain store. Most likely they will have some type of listing but the books will have to be ordered.

Those we have in the shop are commerical bookets and apply to tools that require special machinery. The manchinery companies provide the books with the machinery.

Another possiblity would be to contact the sharpening schools advertised in magazines.

The only tips I could offer you is to work safetly, wear protective goggles, gloves and practice, practice and more practice.
 
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Old 05-31-02, 04:46 AM
arthropod98
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thanks, tom!!

i've been playing with it, and i think you're right . . . just need practice!

one other question though -- about how wet should the wet stone be while sharpening??
 
  #4  
Old 05-31-02, 09:24 PM
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Hello: arthropod98

The wet wheel I use has it's own water tank. The wheels lower 1/3 is submerged in water at all times as it revolves. The water is used to cool the wheel and the tool, also used as a lubricant and means of removing the shavings and burrs.

Based upon that method, there isn't any control of the water volume. I have several machines which do not use any water for cooling. Two that have mist spraying nozzles on the circulating and recovery systems.

On the commerical machinery which does not have cooling systems, common white chalkboard chalk can be used on metal cutting and abrasive wheels. A special type of pencil stick, all in one lube & coolant, which is available at welding supply stores.

An additional tip is to keep a pot or pan of cool water handy. Dipping a tool to keep it cool will help prevent "Bluing." If the bluing is light and only on the surface, it can be removed with a light touch of a fine wire wheel.
 
  #5  
Old 06-04-02, 10:18 AM
arthropod98
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thanks for all the info, tom!

my delta has a little pan that basically drips water on the stone. had to do a bit of rigging to get things set up exactly how i wanted them, but it's working great for me now! wasn't horribly expensive for the setup either, so i'm pretty pleased.

those little cheap chisels i have are nice and SHARP now!
 
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