what type of cable for cameras?

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  #1  
Old 03-22-03, 08:33 AM
piotr_redo
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what type of cable for cameras?

hi all,

i'm new to the forum and wanted to ask a question on cables for security cameras.
i'm considering getting one, and right now i'm sticking with non-wireless ones because i'm aware that pictures from wireless ones can be picked up quite a distance away, as with everything that's wireless.

anyhow, since i'm not sure yet what type of camera i will get, and the cable needs to be put through shortly, i just wanted to ask what the most frequently used type of cable is for security cameras.
i would expect it to be a coaxial cable, just like for the TV, but im not sure thats true.
maybe it would be wiser to put in a cable which would then later on give me a wider range of options, but would also be able to function as a coaxial cable (is that possible?)?
is there anything like that?

thanks in advance for any help!
piotr
 
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  #2  
Old 03-22-03, 09:58 AM
S
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This really does depend on what type of cameras you plan to install. If you want professional cameras, then you need RG59/U for the camera signal. Some cheaper cameras use RCA plugs or S-Video plugs. So, it's really best to decide which camera you want to use first. Now, you can get adapters and such, but these will reduce signal also.

One thing to keep in mind is that most cameras will require some kind of power supply. You can get RG59 with 18 gauge - 2 conductor power wire running with it. I highly recommend this if you want to install professional cameras, since they will require power. Then you could run all your cables back to your wiring closet for connection to power supplies and multiplexers. This should all be in the same place as the CATV runs, phone runs, and the alarm wiring. This will allow you to output door cameras to TVs and use the alarm outputs for recording.

Now, of course, this is all for a professional system. For a low-end system, or a "Sam's Cams" system, you would just run everything to your monitor/multiplexer/recorder and be done with it.

Good luck! Let us know how it goes.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-03, 11:15 AM
piotr_redo
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thanks for the reply!

i've taken a look at the cable on the net and found a few sources on it. i completely forgot the need for power so the
rg-59/u with the power wire running through it would be ideal.
i suppose that that would be ok for 220v (i live in europe) as each camera has its own transformer in it?

i know you've said that adapters reduce the signal, however since the rg-59/u is basically a coaxial cable, i could always adapt it to connect other types of plugs, just in case, no? say to an rca or s-video plug?
 
  #4  
Old 03-23-03, 05:05 AM
jj0072
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no you cannot adapt rg-59 to another connection. You also cannot run 220v down 18/2.
 
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Old 03-23-03, 10:45 AM
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ADI Part No. CD-CPAD501 - BNC jack to RCA plug (Cambridge Products). You can apapt RG-59 to RCA. BNC is the usual connector used on RG-59, however "F" Connectors (standard cable connectors) can also be used with RG-59, as long as they are purchased specifically for RG-59 (they are slightly bigger than RG-6 connectors.)

The problem with S-video is that it carries more than just Video, it also carries Audio and, in some cameras, power. Now, that being said, there are also adapters for S-video, but you could not use RG-59 for the run.

As for the 220V run, you will have to check with local codes to see what you need to use.
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-03, 05:46 PM
piotr_redo
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thanks for all the replies.
i've checked the available cameras and all seem to run on 12V DC,
and have a video output for (??) 75 ohm. which means that the rg59/u would be just the right thing.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-03, 06:23 PM
piotr_redo
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one last question...
if i put in a 50ohm cable instead, what would the effect be? worse image quality or no image at all?
 
  #8  
Old 03-24-03, 02:21 PM
jj0072
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good picture or over amplification depending on what you are using it for. 75 ohm cable has more resistance then 50 ohm cable.
 
  #9  
Old 03-24-03, 02:46 PM
piotr_redo
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less resistance= better?
more resistance = need for over amplification?
 
  #10  
Old 04-06-03, 12:23 AM
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50 ohms and 75 ohms is the impedance of the cables, RG58 and RG59, respectively. The camera should dictate which cable to use for optimum performance. Typically, BNC connectors are for 50 ohms cable(RG58) and F-type connectors are for 75 ohms cable(RG59). In your application, it may not make much of a difference.
 
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