is ADT worth it?

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-12-03, 03:36 PM
jkkw
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
is ADT worth it?

This is a silly question, is ADT worth it? I'm recently in the market for a home security system, and a installer offered me a deal for a console + 3 sensors and 1 motion sensor installed for free. The catch is that i have to sign a 3 year contract with ADT for monitoring, which is 30$ a month. Looking at the options available for the self installer, i'm wondering if this deal is worth it... good self install kits seem to be in the 500$ range (X10 is much cheaper), and 3 years @ 30$ is around 1000$. Question here is - is ADT worth that extra money? Also, should i look out for specific brands for the equipment that is used in my home? How can i shop around for installers? Thanks in advance for the help!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-12-03, 04:25 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Simply put, No. I just got back from the auto shop having my car serviced. I was talking to the owner about his ADT security system and they had stuck him for $35 for 60 months. Now he's trying to see how he can get out of it (won't happen) so he can monitor with us for $14.95/month and no contract. We have a good price, but there are other companies even cheaper out there, I've seen it as low as $9.99/month and even $6.95/month. However, be very careful who you monitor with. The equipment is not nearly as important as the monitoring company. Anyone monitor an alarm system should check to make sure the company is UL listed. This basically means that they have annual inspections to make sure they are complying with UL standards. For more on that, take a look at <a href="http://www.ul.com">UL's site</a> (it can be tough to find the security system listings, it's there somewhere.) A non-UL listed company has no one to answer to.

As for the actual system, I really like the GE/ITI Concord Express. I install them, use them and sell them. They are definitely the best value and the best system. Easy to install, easy to program and easy to use. There are other comparable systems, the DSC 632/832 systems are very popular, as well as the Ademco Vista line. But, I've installed and programmed all of the above and DSC and Ademco systems are much more difficult to program than the ITI systems. Not to mention the Concord Express comes with a 16-zone wireless receiver built in. That alone saves you about $100 right off the top. And a basic system is only around $20-30 more than the comparable DSC and Ademco's, depending on who you buy from.

I've sold many DIY Concord Express systems, and never once have I had a customer who just couldn't do it.

The main thing I can tell you about DIY and installing a security system is to make sure you do your research. There are a lot of companies out there, and a lot them know absolutely zero about security systems. Do yourself a favor and make sure you don't buy from someone like that. They just can't offer the same support as someone who is in the field every day dealing with the same exact systems as you are installing.

Other than that, just look for the best price and the best sales support. Good luck!
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 06-28-03 at 03:16 PM.
  #3  
Old 06-12-03, 11:06 PM
jkkw
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
thanks for the tips brandon..

so you convinced me not to go with ADT - i smelled a rat in the first place, didn't know the equipment is affordable.

anyway, some additional questions (hope you don't mind).
I'm pretty bad with power tools and making holes in walls (which is why i hang out here). If this is the case, do you suggest i get a wired system (like the Concord Express) or should i get a wireless system (like the Simon 3)? Also, if i get the wireless, does it mean that i cannot signup for monitoring?

Also, can you suggest what i should buy, my house is a 2 story house with a front door, a sliding glass door to the backyard, and a door to the garage. I think these doors need to be secured, as well as the 3 windows which are low enough to access without a big ladder... does this mean i need 3 door monitors and 3 window ones? Do i need to secure every single window?

Thanks for the help!
 
  #4  
Old 06-13-03, 05:43 AM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You might want to go with the wireless. Even though running the wires for the wired system isn't difficult, it can be very frustrating and, at times, seem impossible. With a little practice, it's not hard to do, but that's the problem, you have no practice yet. So, I think maybe you should go wireless. It <i>is</i> more expensive, but trust me, it's worth it.

As for doing every window, typically no. That's usually only done on pre-wired houses - since it's easy to run wires when the walls are completely open. On a finished house you do all the doors and maybe a window or 2, but your main protection is a motion detector (which, btw, 1 comes with most basic systems.) If you put a motion detector in the hallway, foyer, or a main area of some sort, then you setup a "trap zone" for anyone entering the house. Now, if you have a basement or something like that, you may want to do a couple of windows, or sometimes in the kids rooms, etc.

Just because a system is wireless doesn't mean it can't be monitored - take the Simon 3 for example: it <i>is</i> considered a wireless system, but you still have to wire for the power, and if you want it monitored, for a phone line too. So, even though it's wireless, it still has to have at least 2 wires. Wireless just refers to the technology used to communicate with the security devices installed in the house - do they have to be hardwired or wireless. Now, another thing to remember is that the Concord Express also has 16 wireless zones built-in. Which means you can use wireless devices with it, but you have to run a few more wired devices on it(Keypad & Siren), but if you have a couple of motions or windows you want to add hardwired, that's a good way to do it.
 
  #5  
Old 06-15-03, 02:26 PM
jkkw
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks brandon, couple more questions..
Do i need a siren? Does the Simon 3 system itself make a lot of noise already? I see they have a wireless siren, but it's an X10 Powerhorn Remote Siren, any opinions on this? Also on your website, what is the difference between the Simon III 2 way Voice Panel, and the regular one? I leaning towards buying the Simon III SAW pack with keychain, but think i also need a wireless smoke detector (but can't find it on your site). Oh, does anyone ever secure their garage doors as well? what would you use?

Thanks.
 
  #6  
Old 06-17-03, 10:22 PM
jkkw
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
about to buy...

anymore advice? i've decided on the simon 3 and will look for a wireless smoke detector for it as well... still trying to figure out if the X10 wireless siren is something i should also get... any more advice before i take the plunge?
 
  #7  
Old 06-21-03, 09:41 AM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry, JKKW - I've been out of town and haven't been able to check the forums.

Both the Simon II and III systems come with a built-in siren. Now, this siren is only about 95db, so if you want a louder one, go with the X-10 remote siren or the Maxi-Blast 110db siren (this one has to be wired in.)

2-Way voice basically means that the monitoring company can "listen-in" at the premises during an alarm or emergency. If you don't want to monitor the system, there's no reason to get 2-way. If you do want it monitored, 2-way typically runs $5-10 more per month - depending on the monitoring company. It's actually a very good option - let's say someone has a medical emergency, with 2-way voice, you don't have to answer the phone or anything, just press the emergency button on the system (or a remote panic button, if you have one) and then when the monitoring company comes over the system, tell them your emergency. It's also very good in a hostage situation - someone follows you in the door, you put in your hostage code and the monitoring company can "listen-in" to see what's going on in the house.

There are some wireless smokes on there, buried in the Wireless Accesories section - there is also a Long-Life version of this smoke detector (comes with a lithium battery.)

There are Garage door sensors available (I just haven't gotten them on our site yet) - take a look at some examples from <a href="http://www.sentrol.com/products/PRD_List.asp?ListID=25">Sentrol</a>. These typically run $20+ each.

The best thing to do with these (if you can't hardwire them) is to use an <a href="https://ssl105.securednshost.com/~safewatc/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/61_33_39/products_id/85">ITI Crystal Door/Window Sensor</a> (that comes with a built-in hardwire input) and just wire the overhead door sensor into the wireless transmitter - effectively making your overhead door wireless. Check back on my site, I'll have some examples of how to use this hardwire input to make hardwired sensors wireless soon.

Let me know if there's anything else I can do.
 

Last edited by SafeWatch; 06-28-03 at 03:11 PM.
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: