securing basement windows

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Old 06-20-03, 08:30 AM
H
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securing basement windows

Our house was broken into through a basement window, which is 12 high, by 24" wide (skinny robber). We have 4 of these windows and I would like to know the best way to secure them: bars, glass break detectors, open detectors (they are sliders but the guy got in buy smashing the window).

I don't currently have an Alarm but I am currently looking for an installer.

Thanks
 
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Old 06-20-03, 07:29 PM
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If they all open into a common space, I'd say a motion sensor would fill your bill, especially since you have burglers that are willing to simpy break the glass. There are even units that combine a glass break sensor into the same package.
 
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Old 06-20-03, 08:23 PM
Grant1120
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Hanton:

I can only share my own experience. If you reported the break in it will show up in the local paper. As such every Alarm company within 100 miles will call you to try and sell you "their unique" system. They will tell you horror stories and play into the fear and shock of having your space invaded.

Clearly they are just doing their job, but after having your home violated, you will be vulnerable.

Do NOT give into the hype. Take your time and figure out the best solution for you.

With the help of some great people on a forum much like this one, I purchased a system and installed it myself. I have service for $12.95 per month and no long-term contract. The Alarm Company programs the system over the phone line with no hassles. Review the various posts on the site and talk with the guys who are very experienced at this and you will get all the help you need.
 
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Old 06-21-03, 06:34 AM
Tech391
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Barrier bars

Barrier bars are what you need in my opinion. They are designed to fit the type of window in question.

Check out this link http://www.selfsecure.com/barrierbar.html


Most alarm companies offer an item just like this. Sentrol, an alarm device manufacturer makes a very good one. These work just like a door contact...meaning, they work off of resistance with a 2 wire plug. There is constant pressure on a switch, when the bar is removed, it trips an alarm showing a perimeter violation.

Easy, simple, dependable.
 
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Old 06-23-03, 10:01 AM
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Re: securing basement windows

Originally posted by hanton
Our house was broken into through a basement window, which is 12 high, by 24" wide (skinny robber). We have 4 of these windows and I would like to know the best way to secure them: bars, glass break detectors, open detectors (they are sliders but the guy got in buy smashing the window).

I don't currently have an Alarm but I am currently looking for an installer.

Thanks
Can the motion sensor be set so that the alarm will go off before the intruders enter the basement.... after they break the glass? I don't want them in the house and then have the alarm go off.

I tried installing a security bar but it was extremely difficult to drill through the steel window frame.

I have an estimate from a installer/monitoring company of $199 and 25/mnth for 3yrs monitoring


Includes

Hardwired install on all open windows on main floor and basement (not including glass break detectors).

3 doors, 1 motion and 2 keypads
ULC listed
I own the system after 3 yrs.

The installer is coming to my place to have a look at the basement to see how it can be secured.

I realize that you can get monitoring for $10/mnth and do a self install but I want to look at all options before deciding.

thanks
 
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Old 06-23-03, 11:57 AM
Tech391
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security bars and other concerns

For most security window bars there should be no drilling needed to be done. One end of the bar sits on the frame work of the window, the other end of the bar presses on the pressure switch that is held on the frame work by force given by the bar and by the adhesive tape that's attached to the pressure sensor its-self.

Motion are a great security answer, however yes the "robber" would in essence have to get in and trip the Motion by walking/crawling in front of it. Glassbreak sensors are an option, however, I personally frown on them all together. They work by frequency and sound. Say if the "robber" were to cut or pry the glass out of the window frame, then crawl through.....no luck catching him that way if only a GB is in place.

I personally would recommend going with the bar across the window setup.... double up the security by mounting a motion in the immediate area by the window if you have any doubts.

The thing is; if the so-called-thief kicks the window in-odds are he will certainly kick the bar out of the way, thus tripping an alarm.

One thing too is; being it this a basement and I am "assuming" (dangerous word) that the security control box is in the BSMT also, be sure to Tamper proof your Panel. By this I mean mount a pressure switch inside your security control box.

If some-one were to get in, not trip a motion/security device,..... if he should open the security panel an alarm would trip sending a signal to the Central Station saying there was a Tamper in the security system. Also, be sure to stick a security sticker on your Telephone interface box on the outside of the house. If you have your telephone wires cut it will trip a silent alarm telling the CC that there are line problems, thus they will call you. Most times the telephone signal option is disabled in security panels, find the section and turn that option on.


Now as far as going with a reputable group for security service. ADT, Brinks, and Protection One have the biggest companies and best known popularity. However, with bigger the company you run the risk of being just a number rather than a client. I would suggest either doing it yourself and learning a lot from it, or going with a bit smaller agency. See, when you lease a system from a company you get to have the system for say 3-4 years and are obligated to a service/monitoring contract for that period. You must abide by their rules. The system legaly is not yours. You are not even supposed to be going into the panel and making adjustments. You could be voiding the contract and if something were to happen, the security co. would hold you liable. That's why a lot of companies after doing an install (in your home) will lock the security box and take the keys with them.

If your up to the challenge, by a good system i.e; Concord, DSC, Ademco, and do the wiring yourself. Hell, even have a rep. from a security co. come to your house to assess your needs. Most security companies will have a sales person come out free of charge to do a walk around inspection and give you some ideas. They do it free because they think you will be buying a system....DOES not mean you have to. Get as many qualified views on this as possible.


It may take you alot longer to do things yourself. When you by a system and decide to do things on your own, first of all first things, put security stickers and a yard sign up. That, believe it or not is 90% of the battle when it comes to warding off intruders. Once the obvious is apparent "this house is protected by so and so security"....the theif will most likely look for a house that is not guarded. All of this would allow you some extra time to figure things out.

I apologize for the book here, but if you have any other questions shoot me an e-mail xxxxxxxxxxx.

Good luck!
 

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