hard wired sensor installation help!

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  #1  
Old 03-25-04, 09:02 AM
matekin
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Question hard wired sensor installation help!

Hi. I am a homeowner planning on putting in a hard wired security system. I have found a wealth of knowledge on how to program and install a security panel but nothing on the window contacts or motion detectors. For instance, I went to Sentrol's website and all the installation instructions for their motion detectors and magnetic contacts are locked out and only available to professional installers.

Are there any books/pictures or web pages showing how to effectively install for instance roller ball contacts on the doors, recessed contacts on windows, where to put motion (PIR) detectors for the best effective coverage while not causing false alarms. Even, where do I mount the contacts on windows/sliding patio doors? I want to make the job look neat. I found Sentrol's application book, but some parts are very vague. Any help would be appreciated.


thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 03-27-04, 05:05 PM
M
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I can tell you that there is not a lot of formal detail information on most of this stuff.

A lot of variables are involved, as different designs of doors and windows are better suited for different designs of contacts.

In my experience, most people have had problems with the roller ball switches on modern doors and windows. The shapes of the frames tend to be a problem, and because the seals on the doors are frequently magnetic these days, the gaps around the doors are larger (which can be a problem for even magnetic contacts, especially on metal doors).

Check out www.grisk.com. They make a wide variety of security contacts, and have all of the specs readily available. Even if you don't buy their gear, you can use it to match the right contacts and switches to the job.

Do "home run" your openings, it will give you much more flexibility, and is actually easier in the long run.
 
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Old 03-28-04, 04:28 PM
matekin
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thanks for the info, it was helpful. What do you mean by home run your openings? Also, is it better to use 22/4 wire for the all the wiring even though most contacts only require 22/2 wire? thanks for your help!
 
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Old 03-29-04, 03:07 PM
M
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Home run means 1 cable = 1 opening run back to the location of the control. Mullioned windows and double doors can be treated as a single opening, but it's better to run them separately if you can. Basically, it's much more flexible, and prevents a single damaged cable run from buggering up the whole deal.

The one exception is smoke detectors, these _need_ to "daisy chain" from panel to the end without any "t-tapping" for the devices to be properly supervised.

The 22-4 question is a matter of preference. I _like_ having the extra conductors available, they can save your sanity from an errant drywall screw or staple. It also means that you don't need to keep track of which cable box/roll you are using for what. Pretty much all security hardware uses 2, 3 or 4 wires.
 
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Old 03-30-04, 07:00 AM
matekin
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some more questions

thanks...it is all coming together! I have some more general questions. I have decided to home-run the system. For example, if I have five window sensors, would each individual sensor go back to the same terminal that relates to that zone I have chosen or do I have to use one zone for each window sensor?

I have a two story colonial with an unfinished attic and unfinished basement. I want to put smoke detectors on the second level. I found one common wall where I could fish wire from the attic to the basement. Is it o.k. to use the existing outlet openings that is used for electrical outlet openings or cable T.V. outlets to get to the fire stops/top plates in the first level wall to run the low voltage wiring? Or will running the 22/4 near the 14/2 110 volt wire or RG-6 cable wire cause interference between one another? Is this against the 2002 NEC code? I haven't been able to find any chases and the central air ducts don't go straight down to the basement to fish wire near them either. Any suggestions?

Finally, is it better to use just the magnetic surface contacts for thin wall vinyl double hung windows instead of recessed contacts? Any suggestions for sliding patio doors? I think I am going to use roller ball contacts for the doors. They are steel with wooden/hollow cores. Any suggestions?

thanks
 
  #6  
Old 03-30-04, 05:02 PM
M
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Running your cabling with the RG-6 shouldn't be a problem. You generally do not want to run parallel close proximity to the 120v cables for any more than a couple of feet in any given place. Low voltage is supposed to maintain a separation from high voltage, and (except for certain special situations) should never share the same junction box.

I would go with the surface mount contacts on the vinyl windows, they are a notorious pain to try to use recessed contacts with.

Sliding doors can use recessed contacts if there is enough void in the edge of the door to put the magnet in _and_, when closed, the gap between the door edge and the frame is reasonably close. It is generally easier to simply use the surface contacts.

As long as your door fits in the frame in such a way as to make firm contact with the ball switch, go for it.
 
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