DSC 832 Compatible with ESCORT 4580?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-26-04, 11:11 AM
SecurityNewbe
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
DSC 832 Compatible with ESCORT 4580?

I am new to this and have a DSC Power 832 and an older MAXSYS 'ESCORT' 4580. Does anyone know if I can install the 4580 on the 832 system and have it work? I was going to try but rather then mess something up thought I would ask first.

Thank You
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-27-04, 05:25 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't think I would try it - to my knowledge, only the Escort 5580 module is compatible with the 832, but I could be wrong about that.

MrRon any input?
 
  #3  
Old 07-29-04, 05:00 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,700
Received 92 Votes on 85 Posts
The maxsys escort is specific to the Maxsys systems.

DSC makes good hardware, but I run out of patience for their habit of making most of their parts specific to specific models. That's why we went to the Caddx/Interlogix hardware: one programming model, and 90% of the hardware works on any given panel.
 
  #4  
Old 07-29-04, 06:26 PM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
DSC makes good hardware, but I run out of patience for their habit of making most of their parts specific to specific models. That's why we went to the Caddx/Interlogix hardware: one programming model, and 90% of the hardware works on any given panel.
Absolutely! I gave up on DSC the last time I installed their wireless (about 2 1/2 years ago or more) and went with GE/ITI (Ron knows.) All of their products are top notch and the support is excellent too.

I don't know how much integration and automation you guys do, Ron, but you may be interested in the <a href="http://www.homelogic.com">HomeLogic</a> products also. Very cool stuff that integrates with most panels and systems out there (not just security systems.)
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-04, 07:23 AM
SecurityNewbe
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank You. Follow up question

Thank you, for the information. I will save the time & effort on that then. I guess I will get started on the contacts now. Don't know if I should open another thread but do I need to install the resistor's on this system? I have read through the posts & see that for EOL monitoring you need to but for NC you don't? is this correct? I don't mind installing them as I have them & not connected the contacts yet, but I am not clear on how to do so. I read one post that says take both wires into a B-connectors and crimp & another that says just connect the resistor to one wire. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thank Again,
 
  #6  
Old 08-02-04, 10:47 AM
S
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,691
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
They are not absolutely necessary, but they are <i>highly recommended</i> for supervision purposes.

EOL's get connected in series to Normally Closed devices (like door/window contacts, motions, glassbreaks, etc.) and in parallel to Normall Open devices (which is usually just the smokes and heats.)
 
  #7  
Old 08-03-04, 09:11 AM
SecurityNewbe
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Follow up question In an older post you had said

"Yes, if you keep EOL's enabled in programming, you have to install an EOL resistor. Technically, it doesn't matter where in the loop it's installed. This is one problem with home running all devices - there's no EOL. To supervise the line properly, you would have to use Double EOL resistors. But, personally, I don't think it's necessary - after all, by the time someone gets to your glassbreaks, they're already in the house - so it's too late.

Just install the EOL at the panel for that loop."

Do I need to use Double EOL resistors or is the contact the EOL? Also when installing the resistor's is this done on one wire or both? I was assuming one but in some posts like the one below where Mr. Ron said put both wire's in, Unless he is referring to both meaning the one cut wire

MrRonFL
In a pinch, the smallest butt connectors (the red ones) will do as a decent pinch hit for a B connector. Just put both wires into one end and crimp that end.


Thanks Again & my apologies if these are dumb questions or I am just mot understanding what I am reading.
 
  #8  
Old 08-03-04, 06:45 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 16,700
Received 92 Votes on 85 Posts
It's a visualization thing, especially for someone who works with wiring as long as I have.

Basically, think in terms of a wire nut. You have two wires coming back from the contact in your panel box. you need to put the resister in series with one of the two wires (it doesn't matter which). Take one wire and one of the wire legs of the resistor, twist them together, and apply a crimp to lock them in place. Wire the resistor to either the zone or common terminal, it really doesn't matter which. Put the remaining lead on the zone/common terminal you didn't use.

I usually put the resistors on the common terminals, but that's just the habit of how my mind works, I've seen equally as many with the resistor on the zone terminal.

This gets more elaborate when you are combining multiple openings into a single zone, but it makes sense after awhile.
 
  #9  
Old 08-05-04, 07:27 AM
SecurityNewbe
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks guys I think I have it now
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: