New System [Security Alarm System]


  #1  
Old 05-14-05, 04:15 AM
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New System [Security Alarm System]

Hi all,

Why is the GE Concord hybrid system so DIY friendly? I read that it is easier to program but can anyone give an example.

How would the GE compare to the Ademco Security - Vista-10P?

I am just looking for a basic system that will protect a few windows and doors so I am sure both of these would fit the bill. One feature I would like is for the system to call my Cell phone. do we still have to treat Cell phones as pagers?

Can anyone recommend a good online source for alarm systems?

thanks Bob
 
  #2  
Old 05-14-05, 09:01 AM
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Basically, for most people, the instructions are a little clearer with a bit less specialized jargon. The programming uses a tiered menu system, and gives plain english feedback on the keypad as you work. Your mileage, of course, may vary.

The Ademco/Honeywell panels are _much_ more flexible, but that flexibility comes at the cost of complexity, and a programming syntex that assumes a degree of technical knowlege.

The calling a cell phone trick is something that only a few (lower end, oddly) systems have been designed for. Central station communication is still the priority.
 
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Old 05-14-05, 06:12 PM
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Thanks for the reply.

Should the wire be 22awg stranded or solid?

Even if I don't do the system now, I would like to at least run the required wires for future use why my walls are open. Would if be safe for me to assume a control panel in the master bedroom and one in the garage?

Can someone detail and very simple alarm circuit zone so I can see what is going on? Letís say the circuit has two windows in the zone. I assume, you wire the contacts in series, which are normally closed. The alarm system watches for continuity in the circuit. If some one opens a window the circuit is open and the alarm goes off. For some reason I donít think that is just right since I know a resister is put at the end of the loop.

Thanks again

Bob
 

Last edited by bob_m; 05-14-05 at 06:32 PM.
  #4  
Old 05-14-05, 08:12 PM
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Actually, you have the basic concept of multiple windows on the loops correct. What I would recommend is homerunning each opening to the panel location, this is much more flexible and easier to troubleshoot (you can wire ganged windows point-to-point, but it's better if you can home run each movable opening). When you are putting an eolr on a loop with multiple openings, you simply pick one and call it the end of line. All the system cares is that it sees the correct resistance on the loop.

For some people, solid wire is a little easier to work with. Stranded is less likely to break at connections, but is harder to work with. It's something of a trade off either way.

The most common keypad locations for prewire are 1 near each primary entrance, and one in the master bedroom.

Remember that you need 4 conductor for keypads, motion detectors, glassbreaks and smoke detectors.

Also, don't forget your siren locations, and to homerun at least a 4 conductor (preferably a cat-5) from the telephone NID to the panel location.

Invest in a pack of wire marker labels from the home center, and lable everything with some kind of logical order.

You end up with a big wad of wire at the homerun end, but it's a lot easier to configure and troubleshoot in the long run.
 
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Old 05-15-05, 05:23 AM
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Ok I got it!

>All the system cares is that it sees the correct resistance on the loop.<
Why is this done, what does the loop or the alarm gain from using a resister?
Bob
 
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Old 07-10-05, 02:38 PM
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The resistor, if placed at the device (or one of them if series'd), supervises the wire. We know that if the panel sees and open, it's an alarm (on normally closed devices). Without the resistor, a short would be normal. What if the wire gets pinched? Or the common wire gets grounded? Or the bugler shorts the wires together. With a resistor, the panel can see these thing and show a trouble condidtion. Some panels allow you to turn off "eolr" (the requirement for a resistor) in programming on non UL systems. As you can see, it's not a good idea to shut it off.

Remember to us 18 guage wire for your power and sirens. 22 guage isn't big enough, even if you twist 2 conductors together.

I prefer stranded, as it is less likely to break if knicked or twisted to much, especially the 22 guage.
 
 

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