ADT ACCORD XPC, intellisense IS-215 sensors


  #1  
Old 06-22-05, 05:15 PM
cipkalo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
ADT ACCORD XPC, intellisense IS-215 sensors

I have installed, or rather wired the entire house with 6 zones and 2 entry doors. However, since this is not my cup of tea, (I do the satellites, networking and all electricity installations) I have a little trouble understanding the connection to PIR to the main unit.

I would also like to once installed to change the settings for the phone calls to be made to a specific number not to ADT.

I simply cant see the logic of resistors that I have been supplied as well as wiring it all up.

The keypad is very simple, it has been explained in the manual as well as the bell wiring. However, on the PIR I am stuck.

somebody please help me>!!!!


thank you
 

Last edited by MrRonFL; 06-22-05 at 08:42 PM. Reason: Removal of potentially confusing link
  #2  
Old 06-22-05, 08:51 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 17,020
Received 139 Votes on 128 Posts
Motion detectors, like all 4-wire devices need 2 conductors to provide 12dc power, and 2 for the alarm zone contact. The 12v comes off of the aux power terminals. Things like glass breaks will wire the same way.

The resistors wire in series with one leg of each zone loop. The best place for them is on the last device in the loop, but they can be wired at the panel terminals, effectively treating the loops as unsupervised NC loops. When properly installed, they give the system a way to know if the zone loop is intact. They also give the ability to mix NC and NO devices on the same loop (rarely done, but there are circumstances).
 
  #3  
Old 06-24-05, 06:05 PM
cipkalo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
thank you Ron

really thank you, however, what I had in mind was that on the previous house that I've done, the alarm technician has used the resistors on each sensor. I kept a little drawing from him, but it just does not make sense.

It goes like this. Power from the aux + (off the panel) comes into the common + on the pir, then travels with a resistor to NC from there another resistor to one of the tamper connectors and then out from tamper to panel into the aux-. IT DOES NOT MAKE SENSE, and it is confusing me completely.

You are mentioning 4 wires, he only used the 2!?!?! Confusing!

Then the magnets for the entry doors were connected with only zone on the panel to magnets ie. black to silver, goes on with a resistor, into another silver and then from there with another res... to gold, then out back to the panel on the zones.


In my instruction for the Accord XPC it shows that zones should be wired to individual pir's and its not even mentioning that the pir' need any power supply.

Unfortunatelly, I am not capable of checking out the past installation to copy the works, and therefore I am really badly stuck on something that might be so simple.

I am sorry to bother you but could you run this system bit by bit for me.
I have been to local library and all the books on the subject have been rented out. Just my luck. I need to finish this loft installation or boil in the loft learning how to with by wrong (or maybe not) little drawing.?@

help please


 
  #4  
Old 06-25-05, 12:53 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Gainesville, FL, USA
Posts: 17,020
Received 139 Votes on 128 Posts
[QUOTE=cipkalo]"really thank you, however, what I had in mind was that on the previous house that I've done, the alarm technician has used the resistors on each sensor. I kept a little drawing from him, but it just does not make sense.


It goes like this. Power from the aux + (off the panel) comes into the common + on the pir, then travels with a resistor to NC from there another resistor to one of the tamper connectors and then out from tamper to panel into the aux-. IT DOES NOT MAKE SENSE, and it is confusing me completely."

I think you are confusing what he did with his notation. The motion you are describing has 6 terminals: 2 for + & - 12v power--these do not get resistors; 2 for C (common) and NC (normally closed) -- these are the actual alarm initiating contacts; and the last two are the tamper contacts that open if the cover is removed (not all motion detectors have these tamper contacts).

There are three ways to handle the alarm and tamper connctions. Since you want to properly supervise the device, we will assume any resistors go on the motion itself (which is the best and most correct way). Two conductors will always go from aux power +/- to the +/- on the device.

Method 1: Ignore the cover tamper contact and use only the NC and C terminals. Your resistor will be in series with either of the two conductors (it really doesn't matter).

Method 2: One of the conductors on the alarm loop goes on C. The other goes on one of the Tamper terminals (again with the resistor in series with either). Put a plain wire jumper from the remaining tamper terminal to NC. This will make the loop open (alarm) if either the motion alarms, or if the cover is removed while the system is armed:

Method 3: This actually takes a total of 6 conductors: Again 2 for power, Two for alarm as in method one, and two more for the tampers (wired like method one) which goes to a specific zone programmed as a tamper (some panels have a special tamper zone seperate from the regular ones)

'You are mentioning 4 wires, he only used the 2!?!?! Confusing!"

Yes, 4, as is 4 conductor wire. You can do this with multiple lengths of 2 conductor, however, it a big hassle in the long run. It takes a pair of wires for 12v power and another pair for the alarm contact, minimum.

"Then the magnets for the entry doors were connected with only zone on the panel to magnets ie. black to silver, goes on with a resistor, into another silver and then from there with another res... to gold, then out back to the panel on the zones."

There should be only 1 resistor on a given zone loop, no matter how many contacts are involved.

"In my instruction for the Accord XPC it shows that zones should be wired to individual pir's and its not even mentioning that the pir' need any power supply."

Yes, whenever possible, motion detectors should be on their own zone. The instructions for the motion tell you what the power requirement is.

If this is the system I'm thinking of, this is not a US market system, and it's a wireless/wired hybrid system; which is why the instructions are probably assuming that PIR's are wireless.

"Unfortunatelly, I am not capable of checking out the past installation to copy the works, and therefore I am really badly stuck on something that might be so simple.

I am sorry to bother you but could you run this system bit by bit for me.
I have been to local library and all the books on the subject have been rented out. Just my luck. I need to finish this loft installation or boil in the loft learning how to with by wrong (or maybe not) little drawing.?@"

Now, all of the fooling around with the tamper contacts is really only needed if you have a fairly high security requirement. Remember, if someone is inside the perimeter to access the motion, then you are already in trouble. Motions are the _second_ line of defense.
 
  #5  
Old 06-26-05, 12:46 PM
cipkalo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Once again thank you

I have done what you suggested.

I've used the 3rd method wereas I have connected all the tamper zones in serial with one end resistor. All power was supplied to from the aux to the PIR's and N and NC with one resistor at NC on all the PIR's. Haven't had enough time over the weekend to do the entry door magnets but they will be done tommorow.

And then I'll let you know. Hope that this is right?

Thank you
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: