Cold Weather smoke alarm

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Old 05-25-09, 03:26 PM
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Cold Weather smoke alarm

Hi, I need some help. I am trying to find a smoke alarm, hard wire if possible, that works in temps that can go to 0F. It is for a horse barn, which is unheated. All the common houseold/ commerical ones I found are not rated for use below about 40 F. The only one I did find was for use in oil refineries and was like $8000!! A rapid tempature rise sensor is a waste cos when it goes off the place is already in flames!
Any ideas????
Thanks
 
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Old 05-25-09, 08:03 PM
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Anything rated/listed for below 40F is going to be expensive. Basically, that's the operational limit that UL and NFPA find electronically reliable.

For something like a barn, you might want to consider a beam smoke detector system. It requires at least a smoke detector capable alarm system to work, but it might be the ticket for your circumstance.

I will warn you, these aren't cheap either, but generally the hardware retail for far below 8k.

http://www.systemsensor.com/pdf/A05-0365.pdf
 
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Old 05-25-09, 11:42 PM
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iam doing stables right now-


using ALL RATE of RISE high heat detectors-


there is too much dust to contend with using any smoke detectors


are you an installing business? or end user??


the beams wholesale are about - $455.oo

use the high heat, with a spread of about 35'
 
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Old 05-26-09, 06:33 AM
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I am the end user. I was looking at the heat rise units but when they triger you already have flames to provide the heat for the alarm to activate, correct? Were you talking about the premade commerical units or something like Fenwal makes?
I may do the beam dector (thanks Mr Ron FL) and have heat rise as a back up. What are you doing in the barn you are woking on?? I am in a rural area with a metal side,wood truss barn,peak height is about 14 feet, concrete floor, EMT,compression fittings, vapor tight lights, boxes, etc. I ideally want the to have a local activated alarm on the building with light and noise and also have it triger an alarm in the house which is about 200' away.
Thanks for everybody's help!
 
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Old 05-26-09, 02:44 PM
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Essentially, you would need to have a real fire alarm system. That unit does require 24volt DC power, and it really sounds like you do want a fire alarm as opposed to security system with add-ons. You can provide this unit with as little as a power supply and a horn or siren for notification if that's your minimal goal.


Your local area may be one where real fire alarm hardware requires professonal installation to code, so you need to start by checking that detail.

It sounds like you are trying to protect a pricy asset. While there are ways to cover that 200 foot distance with wireless, long range wireless can be expensive, and that's a really long ditch to run cables back to the house.

Really, a lot depends on the level of protection and notification that you are really after.
 
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Old 05-27-09, 08:30 AM
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Yeah I am going to hard wire everything to the house rather than relay on wireless. Since this is classified as a agricultural building there are no codes but I try and follow the IRC none the less where practical. Where fire and electricity are involved I do more than what is required as a precaution. The ditch will also have services in it so running another conduit won't matter that much. Since you are in the know, do you think I will have any trouble sending a siginal that far from security cameras mounted in the barn to the house???
Thanks for your continued help!!
 
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Old 05-27-09, 09:47 AM
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200 feet isn't too excessive for most modern CCTV cameras. I'd use CAT 5 wire and video baluns for this. It will be a lot easier to work with than coax.

I'm sure you know enough to keep the low voltage stuff in it's own conduit(s) and isolated from the high voltage circuits.

Since you already have the ditch planned, I'd put as much as I can into it, and if budget allows, at least 1 empty 3/4 or 1" conduit for future use.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 04:34 PM
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You read my mind cos I am putting a empty 3/4 conduit in the trench. The electric conduit will be buried about a foot away from the phone line cable but can the phone line cable be near the cctv conduit line? Think I would be ok to put low voltage fire alarm wires in same line with cctv?
 
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Old 05-28-09, 05:26 PM
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Oh yes, in conduit, those spacings are just fine. The Alarm and CCTV and telecom can share a raceway just fine.

You just need to keep high voltage (70v+) in a seperate pipe from the low voltage stuff.
 
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Old 06-01-09, 04:45 PM
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Thanks for all your help Mr Ron!
 
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