Add house smoke detectors to home alarm


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Old 12-19-10, 04:03 AM
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Add house smoke detectors to home alarm

I have A honeywell alarm sys. I want to add my home smoke detecters the home alarm. My understanding is I have to use A relay to tie in the smoke detectors to the alarm sys. What relay do I use. I can only have 12V DC going to my alarm box.
 
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Old 12-19-10, 08:08 AM
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In general, it's not really a good idea to connect standard single station interconnect smoke alarms to an alarm system; largely because they are far more prone to false trips, and can't be properly supervised.

That said; if you really want to do this, most of the major brands of smoke alarms make a relay module that is powered by the interconnect mechanism. The trick is, in general, all of the smoke alarms have to be the same brand (and sometimes model line). So you need to start with what brand and model your smoke alarms are.
 
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Old 12-22-10, 04:00 AM
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These threads should not be offered any support, and should be treated the same as asking how to make a dryer cord for a generator. The correct answer is "any way you do it is wrong".

Those relays have several issues. First of all, every manufacturer SPECIFICALLY states in the manual that the relay is NOT to be used to tie their smokes to a panel. To do so voids the listings of the smokes, the relay, and the panel itself. They are designed to activate things like egress lighting, door closers, elevator recall, and HVAC shutdown. Not panels. Second, if used in this manner they put high voltage and class 2 wiring in the same box, which is a code violation. Then there is the fact that since the relay itself runs on 120V, if the power fails, the relay will not work, therefore rendering the link useless. And then the mildest of their issues is the falsing.

The only way to add fire monitoring to your alarm system is to add SYSTEM smoke detectors. You don't have to (and in some jurisdictions you can't) replace all your AC smokes. Since it is supplementary protection, you can use one or two system smokes per floor. These can be either wired, or (if your panel is capable) wireless.

Remember, smoke alarms are LIFE SAFETY DEVICES. They are not to be altered or tampered with in any way. If you're going to do it, do it right and know you're safe.
 
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Old 12-22-10, 09:56 PM
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I've already been down this road, and I totally agree with MrRon and JerseyMatt. Smoke alarms are WAY too important to be the subject of a home brew jerry-rig project. A single system smoke detector, when strategically placed, is more effective then all of your AC smokes combined. System smoke detectors are far more reliable, are built better, and have a false alarm rate that is next to nothing. Imagine how many times (you've done it at least once), when you've accidentally set the smoke alarm off because you've burnt something in the kitchen or left the shower on for too long. It's happened to me two times in just the past month. Consider that most monitoring companies will NOT call and verify a fire alarm before dispatching the authorities. Now, imagine the fire department showing up at your house each time that happened. Imagine the embarrassment that you would suffer with your neighbors, and the hefty fine that you would face for wasting the FD's time with a false alarm. Is that risk worth not buying a proper smoke detector for your system? If you really want to add fire protection into your system, just do it the right way.
 
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Old 12-23-10, 03:12 AM
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Don't get me wrong, photoelectric system sensors can and will false. Nowhere near what ionization smokes do, but if you REALLY burn something (like to the point where you have to open all the windows and run the attic fan in the middle of winter - we've all done it ), they'll go off. As such, smokes are supposed to be connected to a DELAYED fire zone. This type of zone has a 30 second communicator delay to give you a chance to cancel the alarm and reset the detectors. If you do not cancel the alarm within 30 seconds, THEN the panel transmits the alarm, and the CO will dispatch fire. And it is absolutely true that most (I believe ALL) monitoring companies dispatch without verification on fire signals (some may be able to note the account to verify on a specific zone, but I wouldn't count on that). Because with fires, every second counts. A fire doubles in size every 30 seconds, so they aren't going to waste an extra 60 seconds trying to call you before dispatching.
 
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Old 03-10-12, 01:54 PM
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Don't do it,it will work but how good it will work is the question.In some cities it is illegal to so such an installation and you can even be fined for it.And if a false alarm is tripped and something happens to the fire department like an accident on the way to your house because of the illegal installation you can be held accountable.
 
 

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