Replacement Smoke Detector Advice


  #1  
Old 07-16-11, 07:53 PM
J
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Replacement Smoke Detector Advice

My current smoke detectors are about 10 years old which is the end of life for smoke detectors so it's time to replace them.

These are interconnected 120V detectors. There is one on each floor plus one in each bedroom.

I have my eye on the Kiddie model Pi2010 which has a photoelectric and ionization sensors.

Does anyone have experience with these dual sensor smoke detectors? Are they good/bad/indifferent?

Ideally, I think I'd like a photoelectric/ionization and CO detector all in one but I can't seem to find one. Does anyone make one?

Thanks for your input!
 
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Old 07-17-11, 11:03 AM
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Remember, heat/smoke rises. Carbon monoxide is heavier than air and sinks. That's why you need separate units for separate needs.

Before buying new, check your old units for wiring setup. They should be chained so that one sets off all. Then check the new units to see that they are interchangeable without major re wiring.
 
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Old 07-17-11, 11:05 AM
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Actually, Kidde (among others) does make a smoke/CO combo unit (http://www.kidde.com/utcfs/ws-384/As...o-CO-combo.pdf).

I still recommend that you go with seperate smoke and CO detectors. The sensing element in a CO detector has about half the useful average lifespan of a Ion smoke detector, so you would end up having to replace the detector despite the smoke sensing mechanism being still good.

Also, the best placement for a CO detector is rarely going to match up with the proper placement for a smoke.
 
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Old 07-18-11, 09:09 AM
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Thanks for the advice.

I'll go with separate smoke detectors and CO detectors. I didn't realize that the life of a CO detector is only 5 years where a smoke detector is typically 10.

Regarding ionization detectors versus photoelectric sensors - is there a general consensus about which is better? One type (and which one) in a detector or both?

Thanks!
 
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Old 07-18-11, 11:58 AM
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My preference is the photo smoke. With basic maintanence (periodic cleaning with canned air/vacuum) the photo smoke will last far longer than the ION device. They are also far less prone to false trips.

The ion detects hot, flaming fires a hair qicker; and photo smokes detect smoldering fires faster (in my opinion, the more likely real-world scenario).
 
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Old 07-18-11, 12:26 PM
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I'll agree with the real world scenario - my parents had a fire a few years ago and it started in the kitchen. The nearest smoke detector was 30 feet away, the heat and fire detection methods would have taken much more time.
 
  #7  
Old 07-24-11, 05:59 PM
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Carbon monoxide is heavier than air and sinks.
Not true, best to follow the recommendation of the manufacturer on placement [it varies but, usually about head-high].
 
 

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